49 episodes

"The Trip is one of the most fun podcast interviews I've ever done. I'm still coming down from the high." —W. Kamau Bell. Join the late Anthony Bourdain’s partners at Roads & Kingdoms for interviews and drinks from around the world. From Oaxaca to the Himalayas, from hallucinogenic potions to Russian carraway moonshine. Hosted by Roads & Kingdoms co-founder Nathan Thornburgh. Beats by Dan the Automator. Artwork by Edel Rodriguez. Kanpai, y'all.

The Trip Roads & Kingdoms

    • Places & Travel
    • 4.1, 277 Ratings

"The Trip is one of the most fun podcast interviews I've ever done. I'm still coming down from the high." —W. Kamau Bell. Join the late Anthony Bourdain’s partners at Roads & Kingdoms for interviews and drinks from around the world. From Oaxaca to the Himalayas, from hallucinogenic potions to Russian carraway moonshine. Hosted by Roads & Kingdoms co-founder Nathan Thornburgh. Beats by Dan the Automator. Artwork by Edel Rodriguez. Kanpai, y'all.

    Episode 91: A Very Simple Pleasure

    Episode 91: A Very Simple Pleasure

    Along with twitterfights, long calls to the unemployment office, and heartfelt conversations with your new sourdough starters, alcohol seems to be a defining obsession of this pandemic. I’ll leave it to the rehab centers and 12 steppers to clean up the mess afterwards; this week, I just need a drink. But not just a box of wine or something, I want something escapist, evocative, alluring. I want a cocktail dammit, something with some class, and this week I’m taking the Trip to Angola, Japan and Austria to get it. That means tequila cucumber elixirs with Ioanna Morelli, in Hokkaido, Japan. That means a Sichuan Daiquiri with Alexa van Sickle in Vienna, and, to start it all off, a beachfront gin-and-hot-pepper drink in Luanda, Angola with Claudio Silva, the founder of Luanda Cocktail Week. 

    Show notes:
    Luanda Night Life (publication)
    20 Things to Know Before You Go: Luanda by Claudio Silva
    Luanda Cocktail Week
    Gyu Bar Niseko
    Early Bird Sapporo
    The Sign Lounge Vienna

    • 31 min
    Episode 90: In Defense of Wet Markets

    Episode 90: In Defense of Wet Markets

    Conversations about wet markets with four people who know them very well: Ro Vasquez of Eat Like a Local in Mexico City, journalist Austin Bush in Bangkok, Paul Rimple of Culinary Backstreets in Tbilisi, and Auburn University food historian Xaq Frohlich.

    If you’ve had the feeling recently everything seems extra bad all at once, in a way that exceeds even your worst and darkest thoughts, well here’s a theory: maybe it’s because everything is related. It’s all one sweater, and this global tug on a single thread just unwound the whole damn thing from. So the big issues—from climate change to corruption to racist bullshit—have just been laid naked by this pandemic, and they there flashing us right outside the window, all at the same time.

    But if we know now that it’s all related, we can perhaps contemplate how to win these longstanding battles in the years to come. And one of those battles will be over markets, the subject of this week’s episode. Traditional markets like the wet markets of Asia are being labeled as the enemy, when in fact, they are our once and future salvation. This episode opens with the sound of the quotidian pre-quarantine bustle of the Deserter’s Bazaar in central Tbilisi, Georgia. It’s the sound you get when a butcher named Jumber with forearms like fire hydrants makes short and joyful work of a side of mutton inches away from the person who is going to take that meat home to cook for their family. That sound is precious, that sound is endangered, that sound needs your attention and protection, in the Republic of Georgia or wherever you are. 

    From Roads & Kingdoms, this is The Trip: The World on Lockdown. 

    Show notes:
    Breathless Australian 60 Minutes Wet Markets in Bangkok investigation
    Culinary Backstreets Tbilisi tour
    How to butcher a side of lamb at Tbilisi’s Deserter Bazaar (video)
    Eat Like a Local CMDMX
    Austin Bush website
    The Food of Northern Thailand by Austin Bush
    Xaq Frohlich’s writings on Roads & Kingdoms

    • 44 min
    Episode 89: Covid Vibe Vacuum

    Episode 89: Covid Vibe Vacuum

    This week on The Trip, a restaurant opens in Oslo, an Ontario activist wants to reform hospital food, and a New Orleans writer calls out the exploitation of hospitality workers.

    • 33 min
    Episode 88: Plan B, or Maybe C

    Episode 88: Plan B, or Maybe C

    This week on The Trip, writer Drew Magary talks about his new novel Point B. Journalist Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan calls from Singapore to talk about her time in a quarantine hotel. Le Monde photo editor Pauline Eiferman talks pandemic photography from Paris.

    Show notes:
    Point B by Drew Magary
    Drew Magary on Twitter 
    Sarong Party Girls by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan
    Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan on Twitter
    Within French Borders, Le Monde photo series curated by Pauline Eiferman
    Pauline Eiferman on Instagram

    • 35 min
    Episode 87: A Death in Harlem

    Episode 87: A Death in Harlem

    More than 15,000 people have died of COVID-19 so far in New York City. Marketing director Tamika Hall lost her grandmother to the disease in Rockaway just before her father died of terminal cancer in Harlem. But with hospice services in the city all but suspended, Tamika had to learn on the fly how to give her father a good death.

    Show notes:
    Gone from my Sight: the Dying Experience
    Tamika Hall (@LadyBlogga) on Instagram

    • 32 min
    Episode 86: Rest Easy, Shokunin

    Episode 86: Rest Easy, Shokunin

    Sometime over the last week, after the 7 o’clock cowbells and airhorns and clapping couples on their balconies died down each night, I started to hear a baritone echoing off the sidewall of the hardware store a block away on Broadway and 98th. It wasn’t until Saturday evening, when I walked the dog down Broadway itself, that I realized that this was no mere living room hobbyist. There were at least a dozen people, properly spaced, including a Mt Sinai ambulance crew on break, who had come to hear this man sing out from his little French balcony on the fifth floor of his building. You forget living uptown sometimes that Broadway Street is also that Broadway, and so it turns out that this man, as I read later, is Brian Stokes Mitchell, a legend, a Tony-Award-winning actor. I don’t go to musicals and I didn’t know his name, but I’m fairly certain now that he must be some kind of superhero: He was diagnosed with Coronavirus less than three weeks ago, battled high fever for over than a week, and then, the moment he was better, flung open his windows and every night onward sang The Man of La Mancha as a tribute to his city and to the people who are busy saving it.

    The choice of musicals seems right for the moment. Coronavirus has made us all so small and absurd; our little homes are our kingdoms now, many of us have lost our jobs maybe our careers, and our carefully constructed hauteur has been, at least for now, laid low by elemental fears about health and survival and family. We are the butt of this joke, we are all the hidalgo Don Quixote. And yet, like the deluded nobleman, here we are still toiling and declaiming and tilting at a future that appears to be mocking us.

    I’ve got three guests on The Trip this week. There’s journalist April Zhu, on the phone from Nairobi, talking about her feelings during this uneasy moment in Africa-China relations. There’s Brian Ashcraft, an author and editor at Kotaku, who has lived in Osaka for almost twenty years, on the surreal pain of losing his father in Texas while he is stuck in Japan. And the first guest you’ll hear from, my old friend Jason Rezaian, talked to me about little lessons for quarantine that he picked up in solitary confinement as a political prisoner in Iran. 

    This is Nathan Thornburgh, and from Roads & Kingdoms, you’re listening to The Trip: The World on Lockdown. Now, here’s Jason Rezaian:

    Show notes:
    Jason Rezaian full episode on The Trip: Episode 25
    Jason Rezaian at Washington Post
    April Zhu portfolio site
    Shimura Ken English Lesson
    Brian Ashcraft’s Saké Bible (pub date Aug 2020)
    NY Daily News on Brian Stokes Mitchell’s nightly performances

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
277 Ratings

277 Ratings

TylerSore ,

Reality mixed with hope

Thank you, Nathan, for keeping this podcast going during the pandemic. Your interview technique and narration somehow cast hope through harrowing experiences of real people. It helps during this very diffcult time.

bigwheedle ,

Thoughtful, funny, enlightening

What more could you want from eavesdropping on conversations and insights from interesting people? A delightful ramble through macro to micro, that keeps a thoroughly grounded and informed (if irreverent) perspective. Love it!

TheJohnWSchmidt ,

The highlight of my week is back

I always used to listen to this show (pre-Luminary) under a mango tree at my favorite bar in Senegal. I was disappointed when they went behind the paywall (though come on, you’ve got to respect the hustle/who amongst us wouldn’t), but am incredibly happy they’re back. Hop back on the bandwagon, give this a listen, and transport back with me to warmer, less socially distant days.

Top Podcasts In Places & Travel

Listeners Also Subscribed To