23 episodes

Join us in crucial conversations that will challenge barriers to equity and inspire action towards a more compassionate and inclusive future.

Through the gift of storytelling and our love of learning, we invite you to share on this journey of personal growth - Uncovering truths, challenging complacency, and building bridges.
Come join us.
Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theunpackedproject/support

The Unpacked Project The Unpacked Project

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 34 Ratings

Join us in crucial conversations that will challenge barriers to equity and inspire action towards a more compassionate and inclusive future.

Through the gift of storytelling and our love of learning, we invite you to share on this journey of personal growth - Uncovering truths, challenging complacency, and building bridges.
Come join us.
Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theunpackedproject/support

    Our Many Identifies: Intersectionality, LGBTQ+ Discrimination, and the Need for Inclusive Communities

    Our Many Identifies: Intersectionality, LGBTQ+ Discrimination, and the Need for Inclusive Communities

    Join us as we discuss the impact of discrimination and victimization on the LGBTQ+ community, how intersectionality plays a role in acceptance, and the effects of family rejection.

    Ian Siljestrom, Safe Schools Associate Director for Equality Florida helps us unpack the disproportionate outcomes which impact the LGBTQ+ community and how societal systems and families can become more intentional about affirming LGBTQ+ youth.  

    In today's episode, you will learn some facts that call attention to the needs of the LGBTQ+ community. 

    Research tells us that:  

    - LGB youth seriously contemplate suicide at almost three times the rate of heterosexual youth. 

    - LGB youth are almost five times as likely to have attempted suicide compared to heterosexual youth. 

    - In a national study, 40% of transgender adults reported having made a suicide attempt. 

    -92% of these individuals reported having attempted suicide before the age of 25. 

    - LGB youth who come from highly rejecting families are 8.4 times as likely to have attempted suicide as LGB peers who reported no or low levels of family rejection. 

    - Each episode of LGBT victimization, such as physical or verbal harassment or abuse, increases the likelihood of self-harming behavior by 2.5 times on average.  

    Listen in and learn where we go from here.

      In honor of Pride, we will also be raising money for The Trevor Project, a leading national organization that provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ+ individuals under the age of 25. We hope that you’ll join us in support by clicking the link in our bio and donating to help save young lives in honor of Pride month.  

    www.trevorproject.org 

    www.theunpackedproject.com


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    • 38 min
    That’s a Wrap: Extremism, Hate, and Where We Go From Here

    That’s a Wrap: Extremism, Hate, and Where We Go From Here

    It's a wrap folks! 
    From extremism and the alt right, to white nationalism and white Christian identity, and the role social media has played in spreading false information, to peace building and how we combat hate at the community level; we’ve covered a lot in just 8 short weeks. And while vastly different from Season 1, we’ve continued to build upon the why’s and how’s of structural racism in America and the ways it continues to inform and influence lives differently.   
    This season taught us the importance of understanding the varied nuances between extremist groups - information that better tells us how to engage in counterterrorism work to dismantle these entities. We’ve discussed mainstream media and the need for a new Fairness Doctrine to end opinion based journalism and fake news. We further learned of the role Christianity has played within white nationalism, and yet, most importantly, we explored that within these narratives, there are communities coming together to fight against hate, systemic racism and bigotry. A hope that we hold for all communities one day.
    Join us with our wrap up episode where we share our insights, highlights and takeaways from season 2! 
    Show us some love by liking, subscribing and reviewing our podcast; and to stay up to date, follow us on Instagram  the_unpackedproject.

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    • 24 min
    Not In Our Town

    Not In Our Town

    Today we sit down with Patrice O'Neil for an exploration of how local level approaches can combat hate. Patrice is the leader of Not In Our Town, a movement of people across the country working to build safe, inclusive communities for all. Her work in collaboration with hate crime victims, civic leaders and law enforcement has made her a nationally recognized leader in the anti-hate movement, and as a filmmaker, she has focused on stories about people in local communities working together for change. Her work seeks to embolden and honor unsung heroes whose everyday actions can lead to a larger impact.

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    Patrice: I remember, there was a group that was forming in Southern California. And there was a woman who got up and said, 'you know what I did after I saw that movie', it's called Not In Our Town, Manhattan Beach, you might want to check it out, 'my husband and I went out on date night and we started talking about it. And we talked about racism in our town. And we realized that we never really had this conversation before. And then we went home and talked to our kids about it. And then we invited our neighbors over, and we started having this conversation.' And, and so it, it opened up this discussion, and it led to this other discussion that became equally powerful, 'then we invited our friends, a LatinX couple and they said, "I'm sorry, we're not moving to your town, we don't feel safe there"', which opened up this whole reason and need to-like, THIS is why we have to do this work. You open a discussion, you are brave with one person, and then another and another and you start talking, the need for change becomes more apparent, and then the force of change becomes more powerful.

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    Listen in as we discover how communities can find courage and strength in the movement and continue to push out hate and pull in unity at a local level, and join us for the rest of season 2 as we explore extremism, the Alt-Right, hate crimes, and the blurred lines of religion underneath it all.

    Show us some love by liking, subscribing and reviewing our podcast; and to stay up to date, follow us on Instagram  the_unpackedproject.


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    • 51 min
    Christianity and White Nationalism

    Christianity and White Nationalism

    Our country was built on this idea of racial superiority. With America's long standing and deeply rooted history of white nationalism, Dr. Damon Berry, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at St. Lawrence University, joins us to discuss the role Christianity has played within the Alt right and American white nationalism.

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    Noelle: Can you give our listeners a little bit of some historical background here with that?

    Dr. Damon: Sure. Sure. You know, the elements that become modern white nationalism had existed before. For example, Charles Lindbergh. The Charles Lindbergh wanted to avoid World War II when he was part of the America First movement. In part because he didn't want to see Europeans killing each other again. He felt that the actual threat was the rising tide of Color to call upon an earlier work of white nationalist idealism, so that the notions that inform pan-European white nationalism post-World War II didn't necessarily get invented after World War II but they come together in a particular way after the defeat of state-based fascisms in Germany and in Italy, and they come out of… a lot of the ideas come out of the work of an American named Francis Parker Yaki, who is then championed later by people like Willis Carto and a person I wrote a lot about, Revilo Oliver, in rethinking exactly what the right wing in America should look like. So, the things that primarily identify American white nationalism is of course pan-Europeanism, right? So, their allegiance is not to the American government, as a matter of fact, they by and large view the American government as the enemy and they view racial identity or white identity as the basic political motive and foundation of any state and that that's what they try to create. Now, how they understand that is different? So, and as that continues post-World War II, leading off of Yaki, Oliver and others, you get further developments of this and of course the latest mutation, if we can use that word, that people are probably most familiar with is in the context of the alt-right and especially articulated by people like Richard Spencer.

    Miranda: Yeah, definitely. Well, then over time, Damon, we see… well, at least we've… we perceive that there's been kind of two different camps that have emerged. You know, there's this one that rejects religion entirely and then one that incorporates it into white nationalism, you know, as you've been speaking. So, can you tell a little bit more about that evolution?

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    Join us for season 2 as we explore extremism, the Alt-Right, hate crimes, and the blurred lines of religion underneath it all.

    Show us some love by liking, subscribing and reviewing our podcast; and to stay up to date, follow us on Instagram  the_unpackedproject.


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    • 30 min
    That One Time We Started a Podcast

    That One Time We Started a Podcast

    We're on vacation this at The Unpacked Project this week! You know - trying to maintain that work/life balance, so instead of skipping a week, we thought it would be fun to throw it back and reflect on all things Season 1!  

    We learned SO much during our first season. From faulty or difficult technology to eye opening interviews, we could have never predicted everything that went down. Despite wanting to throw the computer at times, we stuck with it, and we're here to tell it all!  

    We know we're biased, but all of our interviewees dropped some eye-opening, must-hear knowledge last season. From personal stories about our criminal justice system, to real-life accounts of providing mobile crisis support as a means of public safety, to the importance and value of restorative justice approaches, we covered it all.   

    Join us as we discuss those interviews that were close to our heart and hopefully encouraged our listeners to open their minds and challenge the status quo.

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    Join us next week as we get back to exploring extremism, the Alt-Right, hate crimes, and the blurred lines of religion underneath it all.

    Show us some love by liking, subscribing and reviewing our podcast; and to stay up to date, follow us on Instagram  the_unpackedproject.


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    • 26 min
    When Extremism Becomes Mainstream

    When Extremism Becomes Mainstream

    There continue to be moments when we realize just how far we still have to go in America, and just what little ways we’ve actually come…

    - In August, the Wall Street Journal reported that the first five months of the Covid-19 pandemic saw a 600% increase in membership in the ten largest QAnon Facebook groups.

    - According to a Reuters poll, 13% of the US population supported the siege at the capitol.

    - As of September 2020, nearly 60% of Republicans reportedly believed in QAnon, including newly elected members of Congress.

    The above statistics were pulled from an article, “QAnon and Mass Digital Radicalisation: Peacebuilding and the American Insurgency”, written by Dr. Lisa Schirch, who joins us to unpack the context of these alarming statistics as we explore the impact of social media on amplifying issues of systemic racism and white supremacist ideology which has shaped the culture of the United States. Lisa discusses how easily hate speech and conspiracies spread on social media and highlights the need for a new fairness doctrine, the importance of media literacy education for the public, and regulation of social media companies to reduce the impact of misinformation.  

    Lisa is currently a Senior Research Fellow for the Toda Peace Institute, where she directs the Social Media, Technology and Peacebuilding program. 

    Lisa:  I grew up in Richmond, Virginia, which is a city that I moved to when I was 12 from Ohio and what I learned in public school in Richmond, Virginia is that the civil war is not over for many people. And I lived in a mostly white community and an African-American family moved in across the street from us and the hostility of our white neighbors to that family was so intense. All the other white kids started walking to a different bus stop and I was there with the African-American child who was my new neighbor and, you know, I had been taught racial justice, civil rights movement growing up in Ohio and I couldn't believe what I was seeing, I think and I didn't really realize how divided this country was and how much the civil war continued to live on. You know, that was back in the early 1980s when I was… when that was happening in Richmond, as in my childhood. And I think it shaped how I saw the world, that there were sort of historical injustices that had been suppressed and that people were divided and in conflict in my own country. As I went through college, I ended up living in Chicago, downtown urban Chicago, where I was often the only white person on the metro or the subway, the elves, say what they call in Chicago. And, you know, I became race conscious, I became really aware of the very different experiences that people with different skin colors have in this country. And out of that, you know, I wanted to devote my life to trying to figure out what do you do with historical legacies like we have in the US, and it took me to working in many other countries actually. I worked in Afghanistan and Iraq and Pakistan, Jordan, all over the Middle East as well as East and West Africa. And a lot of my international work in peacebuilding, which is… I ended up majoring this in college, peace studies and then doing a PhD in conflict analysis and resolution, trying to figure out how do you heal societies, how do you transform and become a more just and peaceful place for people to live of all skin colors or all religions. And, you know, that question, it's a question that I still ask today, how do we do this?

    Join us for season 2 as we explore extremism, the Alt-Right, hate crimes, and the blurred lines of religion underneath it all.

    Show us some love by liking, subscribing and reviewing our podcast; and to stay up to date, follow us on Instagram  the_unpackedproject.




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    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

MellyMel3245 ,

Great Conversations

I feel like a fly on the wall listening in on a conversation with friends. This season has been informative and fun, really loved the episode with Noble!! If you’re in the fence definitely listen in! Highly recommended, 10/10 LOL!

edugator6 ,

Real Deal

This podcast feels like conversations with your friends - if your friends were cooler and smarter! Thanks The Unpacked Project for sharing such important and powerful information in such an interesting and accessible way. I’m enjoying listening and learning. Can’t wait to dig deeper and unpack some more. Keep up the great work!

Jon B305 ,

Awakening

This podcast continues to inform me on social issues from a different light. I’d consider myself informed to what’s going on in the world but these women always drop a different perspective and I truly appreciates it.

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