136 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is brought to you in association with Christie's.
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The Week in Art by The Art Newspaper The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.6, 74 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is brought to you in association with Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The destruction of Australia’s ancient aboriginal rock art

    The destruction of Australia’s ancient aboriginal rock art

    This week, we look at the destruction on 24 May of sacred Aboriginal sites in Western Australia by a mining company. We talk to Sven Ouzman, an archeologist and activist at the University of Western Australia about the most recent events and the wider context. Can anything be done to better protect Aboriginal country and Australia’s ancient heritage? 
    Also, this week, as a Russian referendum approves Vladimir Putin’s new constitution—a foregone conclusion, of course—we look at the Russia's alarming crackdown on artists.
    And in the latest in our series Lonely Works, in which explore art behind the doors of museums closed due to Covid-19, we look at a work that will soon be lonely no more. The artist George Shaw tells us about Thomas Jones’s A Wall in Naples, which will be seen for the first time in more than three months at the National Gallery in London when it re-opens on 8 July. 
    Links:
    Our full guide to gallery openings in UK, Europe and the US
    Thomas Jones's A Wall in Naples at the National Gallery
    The University of Western Australia's Centre for Rock Art Research and Management

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    • 1 hr 3 min
    Art and social media: do museums need memes?

    Art and social media: do museums need memes?

    Plus, artist Rita Keegan on her postponed show and Julia Peyton-Jones on Leonardo
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    • 1 hr 3 min
    What to do about problematic statues?

    What to do about problematic statues?

    This week we address the toppling of statues around the world amid the Black Lives Matter protests: is this an airbrushing of history as some claim or a long overdue corrective to historic prejudices?
    We explore what happens now: we talk to Richard Benjamin, the director of the International Slavery Museum (ISM) in Liverpool, UK, about the events which saw the pulling down of the statue of the slaver Edward Colston in Bristol and how museums like ISM can respond to the increased focus on histories of the transatlantic slave trade. We speak to Astrid de Bruycker, the alderwoman for equal opportunities in Ghent, Belgium, where a bust of Leopold II, the king responsible for one of the most brutal of all the colonial regimes, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is being removed. And Hew Locke, the artist who has made works about problematic statuary in various parts of the globe for many years, tells us about his work as some of the statues he has addressed become flashpoints for a new movement. Hew also chooses the latest in our series Lonely Works, looking at art behind the doors of museums that are closed because of the coronavirus pandemic—a painting in the Tate Collection by Agostino Brunias, depicting slaves in the Caribbean.

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    • 1 hr 2 min
    How to visit a gallery during a pandemic

    How to visit a gallery during a pandemic

    On this week's podcast, as galleries in London re-open amid a pandemic, we ask: what does the new normal look like for the art world?
    Ben Luke takes his first steps in an art gallery for three months and talks to Stefan Ratibor and Millicent Wilner at the Gagosian Gallery in London as they plan to re-open on the 15 June. We look at the ways that galleries across the British capital have joined together to share information and plan for the future. Is this a new, kinder era for commercial galleries? Jo Stella-Sawicka from the Goodman Gallery offers her views. And in the latest in our series of Lonely Works behind the doors of closed museums, the artist Deborah Roberts explores Benny Andrews’s No More Games in the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 

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    • 53 min
    Let’s talk about race: museums and the battle against white privilege

    Let’s talk about race: museums and the battle against white privilege

    This week, in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd, we talk about the history of black resistance in the US and how the art world can respond to this latest tragedy. As protests grow throughout the country, Margaret Carrigan, one of The Art Newspaper’s senior editors in New York, speaks to Spencer Crew, the interim director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, about the museum’s Talking About Race online portal. 
    Also this week, we pay tribute to Christo, who died earlier this week. With his collaborator and wife Jeanne-Claude, Christo most famously wrapped the Pont Neuf in Paris and the Reichstag in Berlin in coloured fabric.
    And in the latest in our series of Lonely Works behind the doors of closed museums, Caro Howell, the director of the Foundling Museum in London, explores William Hogarth’s portrait of Thomas Coram, the painting that is the cornerstone of the Foundling’s collection—which she now hasn’t seen for months because of the coronavirus lockdown.

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    • 53 min
    Houston, do we have a problem?

    Houston, do we have a problem?

    As cultural institutions across the world are faced with deciding if and when to re-open, we look at two extremes: we hear from Brandon Zech, the publisher of the Texas-based art publication Glasstire, about a visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, one of the first museums in the US to re-open. And we discuss the Southbank Centre in London’s announcement that it’s at risk of closure until April 2021, with Ralph Rugoff, the director of the Hayward Gallery, one of the centre’s venues. And in the latest in our series Lonely Works—about objects in museums that are closed due to the virus—the artist Michael Rakowitz tells us about some ancient Sumerian figurines in the Oriental Institute in Chicago.
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    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
74 Ratings

74 Ratings

anyasaunt ,

Top of the Line!

I have a wide range of interests and obsessions but this podcast rates #1. Incisive, passionate, in-depth explorations of issues globally.

Chadd Scott ,

The standard bearer art podcast

No art podcast is more connected to what’s taking place in the art world today with an emphasis on London and England.

Hans Obitz ,

Essential listening

Recently discovered this cast. Where have you been all my life? I love this cast. Always relevant artworks scoop and expert accounts of wide international art topics.
My weekly digest of the art wold. Thank you!

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