100 episodes

On the first episode of the Work in Sports podcast, Carl Manteau of the Milwaukee Bucks said, “I’ve always enjoyed sharing insight into working in the sports industry, the things I wish I knew when I was starting out. I love the idea of this podcast, and I’m thrilled to be a part of it.”



That summarized this whole project beautifully.



I’m Brian Clapp, Director of Content for WorkinSports.com and the host of the Work in Sports podcast. I’m sharing all of my best career advice gathered over 25 years in the sports industry, and I’m bringing in a bunch of old and new friends to do that same.



We’re sharing our knowledge with you, so that you can be better prepared to make your mark in the sports industry. Friends like Colleen Scoles, Philadelphia Eagles, Talent Acquisition Manager (episode 5), Mark Crepeau, Basketball Hall of Fame VP of Marketing (episode 8), Josh Rawitch, Arizona Diamondbacks Sr. VP of Content and Communication (episode 18), Chris Fritzsching, Detroit Lions Director of Football Education and many more.



Every Wednesday I bring in a special sports industry guest, like the names listed above. And every Monday and Friday I go solo, digging deep into a fan question related to working in the sports industry. Topics like, are sports conferences worth attending (episode 22)? What are the best entry level sports jobs (episode 17)? How do I prepare for a sports interview (episode 14)?



We’re covering everything related to sports careers, so if you want to make your love of sports more than just a hobby or escape, this is the place to learn more!

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers Brian Clapp - Work in Sports

    • Sports
    • 4.9, 189 Ratings

On the first episode of the Work in Sports podcast, Carl Manteau of the Milwaukee Bucks said, “I’ve always enjoyed sharing insight into working in the sports industry, the things I wish I knew when I was starting out. I love the idea of this podcast, and I’m thrilled to be a part of it.”



That summarized this whole project beautifully.



I’m Brian Clapp, Director of Content for WorkinSports.com and the host of the Work in Sports podcast. I’m sharing all of my best career advice gathered over 25 years in the sports industry, and I’m bringing in a bunch of old and new friends to do that same.



We’re sharing our knowledge with you, so that you can be better prepared to make your mark in the sports industry. Friends like Colleen Scoles, Philadelphia Eagles, Talent Acquisition Manager (episode 5), Mark Crepeau, Basketball Hall of Fame VP of Marketing (episode 8), Josh Rawitch, Arizona Diamondbacks Sr. VP of Content and Communication (episode 18), Chris Fritzsching, Detroit Lions Director of Football Education and many more.



Every Wednesday I bring in a special sports industry guest, like the names listed above. And every Monday and Friday I go solo, digging deep into a fan question related to working in the sports industry. Topics like, are sports conferences worth attending (episode 22)? What are the best entry level sports jobs (episode 17)? How do I prepare for a sports interview (episode 14)?



We’re covering everything related to sports careers, so if you want to make your love of sports more than just a hobby or escape, this is the place to learn more!

    Jake Lyon: “The Perfect Poster Boy for Esports” – Work In Sports Podcast

    Jake Lyon: “The Perfect Poster Boy for Esports” – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning at WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…Prepping for this week’s interview was unlike many of my other weeks. Most of the time I have a pretty good vibe for the person I am going to speak with, their role, their struggles, their big goals - and can lean into that in my question development. But sometimes when you reach outside your comfort zone, it can be quite exhilarating. I’ve made it clear on this show multiple times prior that I am not a gamer. I don’t know the lingo, the leagues, the competitors -- but I am fascinated by the eSports ecosystem and subculture. Not in a - I want to give that a go way - more of a, this thing is huge, fans are dedicated, brands are flocking to it...I want to know why and better understand it. I’ll admit, and my wife will concede, that sometimes I avoid doing things I am afraid to fail at. The challenge of rebuilding our staircase I put off for quite some time because I was afraid to put tons of time and effort into it, and have it look like crap in the end.The challenge of researching and understanding eSports, and booking more guests connected to it, is something I’ve put off because what if at the end of it all, despite all the research and attempts, I come off sounding like an out of touch moron.Our internal monologues protect us from failure, but also sometimes prevent us from trying. Well, thanks to our awesome graphic designer Chris Culp who designs all of the podcast episode artwork for us, he broke me out of my shell without me even knowing it. He basically booked today’s guest and said - “hey I think you should do this” -- panic panic panic. Truth is, I went through my normal routine -- reading articles on the person, videos, background, social profiles and become quickly inspired to ask the questions you’ll hear shortly. What I found stupefying through my research, was the patronizing manner most people of my generation and older, speak to the youthful gaming audience. It’s like this stunned question repeated over and over again “so you can make money playing video games… ha!” or “Did you ever think wasting your youth on video games could work out for you like this?”The implied nature of the questions is that even though you are my guest and I am interviewing you because you are important, I want you to know, i think you are not important. Kind of made me mad. Offended. Ashamed. Funny thing is, I asked today’s guest about it and he couldn’t have been more mature and gracious. Jake Lyon is a 23-year-old retired gamer who played for the Houston Outlaws of the  Overwatch League, and is now part of the Overwatch broadcast team as a caster.  Financial Review called him "the perfect poster-boy for the sport as it tries to dispel the prejudice that computer-gaming is a lonely pursuit of wastrels and slobs" and in July 2018, Lyons was selected as one of two Overwatch League players to attend a summit between the International Olympic Committee and the esports community. He is an ambassador for eSports, a charismatic, mature, well-spoken passionate young man -- who is also our guest this week. Here’s Jake …Questions for Jake Lyon, Overwatch League Caster1: There is so much I want to get into regarding your background and how you got where you are – but before we jump into your story, I’d like to start out by discussing eSports in the current landscape.We keep sharing the quote around our office that “there is opportunity in chaos” – and when I say this out loud, I think this exemplifies eSports.Is esports ‘having a moment’ because it is perfectly suited to thrive in this current environment?2: I saw that the annual competition for the gam...

    • 44 min
    My Sports Internship Got Canceled, Now What? – Work In Sports podcast

    My Sports Internship Got Canceled, Now What? – Work In Sports podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work in Sports podcastOver the last few weeks I’ve been part of a handful of great webinars sponsored by various schools -- Northwestern, Neumann, IE just to name a few - thanks to all of them for having me and thanks for a great discussion.One pattern that kept coming up was this -- My summer internship has been canceled, and that was a major part of my plan to gain experience, what should I do?This is a really great question and I want to dig into it with some ideas. In these webinar settings, I have to be pretty quick with my points, but in this setting, which I control,  I can expand. First, let’s get specific about an Internship and what it represents. Internships provide a lot of value -- you learn some things, you meet some people, you get exposed to company culture, you start to learn what you like and don’t like career-wise  - all important stuff. So first off, let’s see what we can replicate from what you are missing in the internship.1: What experience were you expecting to get? We can’t recreate what it’s like to be working in the box office on game day, but we can recreate sales techniques, we can learn graphic design, we can learn specific skills.Reach out to your intern contact, tell them you are disappointed but understand and ask f there are specific software or tools, or techniques they use at the organization that you may continue to learn even if not on site. It’s not a 1:1 replacement, but in these times you need to adjust. 2: Meeting people -- well, you don’t get to meet the people face to face at the organization, but you have an in to network with them via social -- we always talk about how you need an angle to network, a reason that connects you to them -- well, it’s pretty clear what this would be. Reach out to people in the organization you were going to intern with via LinkedIn, add a note -- hey I’m Brian I’m a college junior and was going to be interning with your org this summer -- that’s not happening but I still want to get to know and learn from people like you. Once you connect, ask for an informational interview. Employers and sports workers are sympathetic to what you are going through right now and will help you. -- So we can replicate some of the experience, and the networking. Replicating culture or learning more about what you like and don’t like -- we’ll we can’t really replicate that, but information interviews with people you would have been working with can help. Ask some questions in those areas -- how did you figure out this is what you wanted to do? What is the culture like at the organization, and how does that differ from other places you’ve worked. You can learn a lot from asking questions of the right people. Now let’s talk about preparing in the now and some other strategies you can utilize1: If your college has a career center -- lean into it, see if you can set up a virtual meeting with a counselor, and talk through some ways you can make up for the internship experience. They have tools and research available to you!2: Be ready to act quickly -- Usually setting up a summer internship happens in late winter, early spring -- well, things may start to happen fast and opportunities may come up quickly, looking to fill roles. No guarantees here, but if we start to see more sports come back in some ways, and socially distanced workplaces come back to life… they may very well be a quick supply and demand issue for interns. Be ready to move on opportunities quickly. On WorkinSports.com we keep all the sports internship data and opportunities up to date - it’s a great resource for you to stay in the loop on opportunities. You must stay flexible and adapt to these times -- if you see something pop that interests you, go for it,

    • 18 min
    Chelsea Zahn: Pittsburgh Steelers Partnership Activation Manager – Work In Sports Podcast

    Chelsea Zahn: Pittsburgh Steelers Partnership Activation Manager – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp VP of Content and Engaged Learning at WorkInSports.com and this is the Work in Sports podcast…Popularity is a slippery beast.As a podcast host, I am always looking for interesting guests, with recognizable names, fancy job titles and experience to share. My goal is always to provide actionable advice for all of you, and share it through either my voice and experience or by my guests. But I get back to the original premise - popularity, virality, shareability - totally unpredictable. You hear people in marketing always saying - I want viral content! As if it is that easy. That’s not a strategy, it’s a dream.  My belief has always been you make a lot of quality content, and try to learn from each piece that resonates with your audience. You constantly refine and adjust - not always in a major way, not always a complete shift, just subtle movements in your approach, tone, and content. Now let’s be clear, going viral, or having something spike in popularity, doesn’t always connect to your business. The concept of just going viral is flawed. I wrote an article years back when I had my own site - it was a funny article comparing injuries in hockey to injuries in baseball. It went nuts. Hundreds of thousands of views, hundreds of thousands of Facebook likes, thousands of shares -- the thing went crazy. It did zero for my bottom line. Literally zero. Sure we can talk about brand exposure, and the potential to grab new audiences, but for all the virality it made little impact on my business. So viral in and of itself doesn’t always change the calculus of your business. It has to all be connected - content to business strategy. Now let’s get this back to this here podcast. I don’t reach for popularity anymore. I try to let it happen naturally by delivering the information the audience can grow from.I book guests based on the impact I believe they can have, and then sit back and watch to see what happens with downloads. Sometimes I have a vibe, like when I book big names like Leigh Steinberg, or Dan Duquette, that they will be popular. But what has been truly eye-opening is that guests like Colleen Scoles, Mailynh Vu and Mark Coscarello, talent acquisition managers with the Philadelphia Eagles, Cleveland Indians and USGA respectively have doubled up Leigh Steinberg in downloads. It comes down to knowing your audience and what they want. Chelsea Zahn was a guest I booked last year, a young woman on the rise in the sports industry working in Partnership Activation for the Pittsburgh Steelers -- to me, she met the criteria for a great gust, charismatic, interesting career, not many people know about Partnership Activation, and willing to share great advice. I interviewed her, was proud of the content...and then was completely amazed when her episode became the second most downloaded of 2019 behind only Mailynh Vu who, I mean come on was the rockstar of 2019 and if you haven’t listened to that episode you are crazy. I’m guessing many of you new to the show also haven’t listened to Chelsea, so today is your day -- here is Chelsea Zahn, partnership activation manager for the Pittsburgh Steelers. 

    • 35 min
    Remote Hiring is Here to Stay – Let’s Prepare! Work In Sports Podcast

    Remote Hiring is Here to Stay – Let’s Prepare! Work In Sports Podcast

    Tips and Advice to Help you Master the Remote Hiring ProcessHey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp VP of content and engaged learning at WorkinSports.com and this is the Work in Sports podcast…Hiring will remain virtual for the near future, and quite possibly beyond, so let's get you prepared: * Virtual interviews* Phone interviews* Video interviewsWe are missing the in-person interaction -- which stinks, but it’s justa  problem wer all have to deal with. If you are someone who relied on your charisma in the moment to get you through -- make sure your skills are on point, and you figure out how to translate your charisma to the small screen and the phone.Again - your skills become more of the focus if you can’t get by being just the smoothest operator.Tone: Right now there are a lot of deparate people out there, I don’t mean this to be discouraging or a dig on those who are suffering, I just mean from the ermployers viewpoint, there are a lot of people applying for their jobs that may not have in normal times.“Be ready to talk about why you want to work for the company you’re interviewing with and why you feel like the job makes sense as your next career move.” You need to be able to make sure the employer knows you are interested, you want this gig, and why you feel like this job makes s4ense for you in your career.You don’t want them thinking you are just looking for work -- you want them to know this is a logical career move for you and something that excites you.Normally… I tell you to make sure there are no distractions. No dogs barking, no roomates barging in. The good news is, everyone is a little more quarantine supportive and knows the world isn’t perfect right now. Try to keep distractions low, but don’t lose your groove if something happens.Acknowledge it, and get back on track. Or plow through without letting iot affect you at all, that shows a lot of focus.2: Expect more rounds of interviewsEmployers love the final face to face phase because that’s where they make sure they know the person and feel they are a cultural fit. Without that, they are extending the process in other ways. More rounds of phone or video interviews, with more people in the building. They are trying to get multiple viewpoints to be sure that they have the right match.Don’t get discouraged if the process takes longer than normal, or expected. There is no normal anymore, throw out everything you used to know. 3: What skills are more important now that ever?* Establishing trust* Communication* Collaboration* Adaptablity4: Expect more questions on how you handle challenges* Have a story related to how you handled an unexpected challenge in your repertoire. 5:  You can still be selective* You are learning here too, about their culture their workforce etc. * Don’t rush to choose the wrong job, try try try to be patient and listen to your instinct.

    • 18 min
    Averee Dovsek: The Challenges Facing Student Athletes – Work In Sports Podcast

    Averee Dovsek: The Challenges Facing Student Athletes – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…I saw someone post today, quite longingly, that they miss sports. I know it’s a feeling we all empathize with, but it was the manner they shared it. It just seemed so raw and honest. Not like a complaint, rather just a plea. Like it had a deep sign in the middle. I miss sports.We all feel that way, but I can only imagine what it’s like for college athletes right now who would be in the midst of their spring seasons. Athletes are used to routines, almost all that I have interviewed, have their days organized to the extreme. Wake up, train, study, practice, gym, practice, class, train, bed. Scheduled down to the minute. Preparing their mind and body for competition. Now, take that away.I know many athletes when they finish their career, they lose a piece of their identity, they’ve always been a competitor, and athlete - that is their brand - and they struggle to reidentify themselves with the world, and within themselves. They don’t know who they are. Now imagine in our current world, having that taken from you unexpectedly. There was no soft landing you can see coming in the future -- just one day, poof, it’s gone. The Hofstra men’s basketball team hasn’t made the NCAA tourney since 2001. They’ve only made it four times total, losing all four times. They qualify, they are pumped, and then it’s over. Baseball players, golfers, track and field stars… it all just ended. Their routine was broken, but also the chance to make incredible, lasting memories. Which is one of the main reasons I wanted to have Averee Dovsek, Hofstra women’s golfer on the show this week. Through the despair of her season being canceled, she is still making the absolute best out of things and keeping a positive attitude. AND before this world turned upside down- she was already a model for how student-athlete can manage their time and still gain career-focused experience…  Here she is, the next big star in sports broadcasting, you heard it here first, Averee Dovsek…Questions for Averee Dovsek, Hofstra Women's Golfer and Aspiring Sports Reporter1: There is so much I want to talk about in regard to your career development in the sports industry, some of the sports broadcasting internships you’ve done, and more… but I want to start out with being a student-athlete in this crazy time.You compete on the golf team at Hofstra, Division 1, what is it like right now being a student AND an athlete in this unique time?2: This should be a time of year you are training, practicing, competing, but with that not being an option, how are you maintaining your edge?3:  A big part of playing sports is the community that comes from being on a team – how are you staying connected with your teammates and trying to keep that bond strong?4: I get questions from student-athletes all the time, saying “I don’t have the time to intern, how can I get a job in sports without experience”. I’m empathetic to this, but you’ve done some very high-level internships, how have you done it and how would you advise other student-athletes?5: Let’s talk about those internships, you’ve leaned into who you are, and I think that is really smart. Your edge is your knowledge and experience in golf and you want to go into broadcast journalism so getting an internship last summer at the Golf Channel made a lot of sense.These roles are competitive, what was the hiring process like for you, and why do you think they selected you for the role?6: What did the role consist of, and how did you make the most out of it?7: You seem like a naturally outgoing person, what was your approach to networking and getting to know people at Golf Channel while you were interning?

    • 32 min
    Showing Leadership and Adapting to Change – Work In Sports Podcast

    Showing Leadership and Adapting to Change – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning at WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…Three straight days of sunny weather and I’m feeling good. We’ve been mid-70s and bright sun the last three days, which is perfect. And weather definitely affects my mood, so expect some positivity today!If you haven’t listened to last week’s podcast with Ari Kaplan, you need to. Seriously, it’s a long episode, but it didn’t feel it.  Ari is one of the OG’s of baseball analytics and has some great, great stories. Plus, he shares how to break into the world of sports analytics, and much more. As I said, long episode but worth it -- there are some episodes, just being honest, that feel like they drag or take a long time to get to grandma’s house. Ari, man, loved this interview.Coming up on Wednesday is Averee Dovsek -- Averee is on the women’s golf team at Hofstra, so we talk a good deal about being a student-athlete at this time. AND we discuss interning and gaining experience as a student-athlete- it’s unique being an athlete, your time is allocated to training traveling competing… so many struggle to gain career experience. Averee is the exception - she’s done internships at the Golf Channel and PGA Tour Radio - and we talk about what she's learned, how she’s focusing on her career, and managing her time. Really great stuff coming up later this week.  As for today…The sports career-focused question comes in from Josh in Indiana - “Hey Brian, I’ve heard a lot of people on your podcast say they look to hire people who are leaders or have leadership potential. Two-part question -- how do I develop leadership skills, and how do I show them off in the applicant process?”Josh -- good stuff. It’s true, for a long time I’ve been saying the main attributes people need to be successful in any industry is to be coachable, curious and competitive. They are all pretty self-explanatory, but being coachable means you listen well, take to teaching, can be molded, being competitive means you will work hard work extra, want to be the best, learn new skills, look for an edge and being curious means you are a constant learrner, always curious and always strviing for more.But we really need to add to that list. In these times, and in the development of the new normal, we need to stress adaptability and leadership. Let’s talk a minute about adaptability before we get into leadership. I have spoken to hundreds of people over this quarantine, and I’d say they can be broken into two groups. 1: Those who freak out. The sky is falling, I will lose my job, I’m going to get the virus, the economy will crash, we’ll be in a depression, I’m in a depression. Everything is panic and overwhelming. 2: Those who are seeing the problem, analyzing it, and figuring out how to adjust and adapt. They are looking for opportunities, taking some of this in stride, adjusting to virtual meetings, learning, and saying to themselves, I may get this thing… but I’ll beat it if I do. Now, I’m not being naive here -- there are people at massive risk for this virus and I am not advocating taking it on face first -- I’m just pointing out that there are some who adapt, and there are others who get overwhelmed. I know someone who is an at-risk case, she has every reason to fear coronavirus, but she’s not letting it overwhelm her. She’s quarantining, she’s adjusting to zoom life, she’s working remote and she’s hell-bent on proving her continued value to her company. She’s not wallowing, she’s adapting. That adaptability is important now, and forever moving forward.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
189 Ratings

189 Ratings

Godspeed25884 ,

The Best Relevant Information for Sport Professionals

I am so thankful for the Work in Sports Podcast. I have been listening for about a year. I have learned so many practical tips and wonderful advice that I have been able to apply to my previous internships and jobs. I now have confidence when I am applying for full time jobs and interviewing. Please listen to the podcast and take notes. So much good information for sport professionals

appneers ,

A not annoying podcast with

Brian has great information, great guests and a great show. He also speaks at a normal speed which is so much better than those slow-talking podcasters speaking in soft tones. I want good info given to me in a normal conversational tone and speed.
But back to content - great content and information for those looking to learn about working in the sports industry!

Joe Alas ,

No BS! Real information designed to help you

Love this podcast. It is empowering and inspiring.. highly recommend for anyone wanting to get into sports as a career.

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