100 episodes

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

The Workamper Show Podcast Greg Gerber

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 13 Ratings

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

    Robert Ruesch describes opportunities for volunteer chaplains to serve at RV resorts during winter months in Episode 125

    Robert Ruesch describes opportunities for volunteer chaplains to serve at RV resorts during winter months in Episode 125

    Today I’m going to speak with a man looking to match volunteer chaplains with RV parks in Arizona, Texas and Florida.



    Robert Ruesch is the founder and CEO of Christian Resort Ministries, an organization based in Evergreen, Colo. It was founded in 2002 as a way to answer a question many full-time or seasonal RVers have when they’re spending several months at an RV resort – where can they go to worship as a temporary resident of the area?



    Robert wanted to create an environment where people of faith could gather in their sandals, shorts and a T-shirt. After all, they’re often retired or on vacation. The ministry currently provides chaplains to more than 40 resorts.



    Depending upon the resort, the non-denominational services can attract as many as 200 people, which is larger than many churches. Robert recalls welcoming people from 47 different denominations to a service he held in one resort.



    The chaplains are volunteers and many of them are retired pastors or lay people who have been significantly involved in their local churches. But, they all share a common calling to teach people, provide support and care for others in their community.



    Not only are the chaplains leading weekly worship services, they are also leading Bible studies or hosting family activities, like movie nights, at the park. Sometimes they organize potluck gatherings while other times they may be visiting people in hospitals or running errands for those who need some help. Occasionally, chaplains will officiate at weddings and even memorial services.



    Chaplains can work anywhere from 20 to 60 hours a week, depending upon how involved they want to be at the campgrounds they serve.



    Many times, Christian Resort Ministries works out an arrangement with the resort to provide chaplains with a free RV space which includes all utilities. However, an offering is also taken at each service and the money raised helps to cover the chaplain’s expenses.



    What makes Christian Resort Ministries so unique is that when they match a chaplain to an RV park, it is expected that the same chaplain will return to the same resort every year for three to five years. That allows chaplains to really get to know people in the campground and develop relationships with them.



    There are a lot worse places for chaplains to suffer for Jesus than in the Sun Belt during winter.



    Robert said that many chaplains have worked in ministry for much of their lives and, therefore, may not have the retirement funds to be able to winter in warmer climates. This opportunity allows chaplains to continue pursuing their callings while serving as non-denominational faith leaders at a resort community for a few months every year.



    RV parks like having chaplains on their property because it helps make the campground feel like a community. It also helps to have a chaplain on site if a spouse dies or becomes seriously ill. On occasion, chaplains may help mediate disputes.



    Chaplains start work in October right after an annual conference in Colorado and generally continue working through Easter.



    People interested in serving as chaplains will first complete an interest form that describes their experiences in ministry and why they feel called to the position. All chaplains undergo background checks and their references are called.



    Once accepted into the program, chaplains take part in an orientation and training that usually takes place in Colorado before they are matched to a particular resort. Orientation helps prepare chaplains for some of the situations they may encounter at an RV park and guides them in developing a faith-based community at the campground.



    Chaplains are matched to a mentor who is always available by phone for consultation. All chaplains in a state often gather at least once a mo...

    • 42 min
    In Episode 124, Lindsey Jaroszek and Tracy King-Garappolo describe Workamping jobs in the western states with Aramark Hospitality

    In Episode 124, Lindsey Jaroszek and Tracy King-Garappolo describe Workamping jobs in the western states with Aramark Hospitality

    Today I will speak with two women from Aramark Hospitality Management about Workamping opportunities at resorts around the country, and specifically, about the need for Workampers in northern Arizona.



    Lindsey Jaroszek is a talent acquisition account manager with Aramark Hospitality who is responsible for finding people to work at resorts in several western states. She is joined by Tracy King-Garappolo, who works as an assistant human resources specialist at Lake Powell Resort and Marina.



    Aramark contracts with a number of state and national parks to provide hospitality services as they relate to public-facing activities, such as hotels, restaurants and guided tours. Lindsey hires Workampers for four of those parks, including Olympic National Park in Washington, Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, South Lake Tahoe in California, and Lake Powell National Recreation Area at the Arizona/Utah border.



    There are a variety of jobs Workampers perform and it depends upon the location as to what jobs are available. Some resorts may hire people to work at the front desk, provide concierge services or do housekeeping jobs. Other sites hire workers to engage guests in various activities or to lead tours.



    Some resorts need Workampers in the food and beverage operations, while others serve as campground hosts and in retail centers, like gift shops and grocery stores. There are a few jobs available for bus drivers and experienced boat captains, and all the locations need some type of maintenance help.



    Most Workampers put in 40-hour work weeks during summer months, but the work may taper off in the fall. Again it depends upon the location, and there are different shifts available, too.



    All the jobs are paid, but the rate depends on the location. Yet, Workampers can take advantage of some great perks, like free or deeply-discounted equipment rentals. Some locations offer completely free RV sites, while others may charge a subsidy to cover utilities.



    No special training is required for most jobs, except marine mechanics and boat captains do need the tools and experience to be able to work on boats. Some cross-training is available and promotion into managerial positions is possible, too.



    Recruiting Workampers takes place year-round, with a bigger push in the early part of the year. Returning Workampers do enjoy some advantage in the ability to lock in jobs early.



    Workampers enjoy a variety of full-time jobs at multiple locations in the western United States.



    Once people have worked at one Aramark Hospitality location, it’s easy for them to transfer to another resort. That means people have many opportunities to work within the same company, but at different locations.



    Tracy and her husband, on the other hand, got jobs at Lake Powell Resort and Marina, fell in love with the desert scenery as well as the lake, so they stayed for many years.



    The jobs are open to singles and couples, although some campgrounds may have limited availability for solo Workampers. Teenagers who are at least 16 years old can also get jobs at the resorts. Families with young children are welcome at the parks, too.



    All of the jobs will require a background check and pre-employment drug screening. People who will be operating Aramark vehicles will have their driving record reviewed, as well.



    All of the Aramark properties are located in high-demand tourist destinations, which means there are plenty of things to do during off-hours. The company even plans and schedules special activities for Workampers and other seasonal staff, especially for those who are working housekeeping positions.



    While managers make every effort to set schedules so that couples have the same days off, sometimes they’ll only have one day off together,

    • 44 min
    Austin Faught with RV Park Management describes how to work for campgrounds around the nation in Episode 123

    Austin Faught with RV Park Management describes how to work for campgrounds around the nation in Episode 123

    Today, I will speak with someone from an RV park management company who helps campground owners improve their operations as well as run the parks for absentee owners. He’s looking for Workampers not only at the three RV parks he owns in Florida and Texas, but also for other parks within their network around the nation.



    Austin Faught is the founder and president of RV Park Management, a company located near San Antonio. His firm owns two RV parks in Texas and one in Florida. However, his company also manages RV parks for people who buy campgrounds, but don’t want to manage the day-do-day operations of the business.



    Austin had worked in commercial real estate for about 10 years and came up with the business idea while pursuing his first RV park investment in 2017. He discovered a number of inefficiencies in RV park management. He had lots of questions. However, there were not many management companies available to help him understand the ins-and-outs of running a campground.



    The ability to acquire the RV park was an ideal business opportunity for him, but he knew he’d need to hire a team of professionals to profitably run the park. The structure he created to support that first RV park now works to support other RV park owners.



    Each of the parks Austin owns has a separate management team who hires Workampers to help maintain the property, take reservations, check guests in and lead them to their sites as well as provide the level of service to guests Workampers like to receive themselves when they’re traveling.



    The beauty of working for a company like RV Park Management is that when a Workamper is ready to explore another area, they can switch locations, but still have a job somewhere else that is run just like the campground they left. The systems are the same as are the processes. What’s different is the scenery.



    Austin likes to hire Workampers because they understand what customers expect and they’re really tuned in to what it takes to deliver first-class service.



    Because the parks are available in the southern states, the jobs are generally open year-round. What makes RV Park Management so unique is that some of the jobs available to Workampers can be performed remotely. The company established a call center, of sorts, that works as a backup to the office staff at each of the parks.



    For example, if the phone rings, but the staff at the RV park is busy helping another guest in the office, rather than going to voicemail, the call is directed to the call center, which may be another person working from his or her RV.



    Because the company specializes in RV park management, the staff is always looking for new ways to improve service to all RVers. I was impressed by Austin’s desire to improve what he calls “touch points,” which are ways to provide personalized service, such as speaking to a real person rather than an answering machine.



    When a Workamper suggests a new idea and it works well, chances are good it’s something that would be implemented in other RV parks. So it’s possible to have tremendous impact on the operation of several campgrounds.



    Generally, Workampers are on the clock 20 to 25 hours per week. Almost all of the jobs are paid and they come with a free RV site. Austin thinks his campgrounds attract better people when Workampers are paid for the hours they work without having to pay money back to the business in order to rent their RV site.



    There are some full-time jobs available and they come with extra benefits, like health insurance. So, RV Park Management really is trying to elevate Workamping opportunities and perks across the board.



    People who enjoy variety in their job, love challenges and have a knack for identifying ways to make improvements will likely find Workamping for RV Park Management to be a great job.

    • 35 min
    Greg & Bonnie Dixon discuss operating a LifeWave business from their RV in Episode 122

    Greg & Bonnie Dixon discuss operating a LifeWave business from their RV in Episode 122

    In today’s episode, we’re going to look at two issues that many full-time RVers often think about – staying healthy and making money.



    Greg and Bonnie Dixon are from Vancouver, British Columbia. They have been RVing since October 2017. In fact, they have put on 18,000 miles traveling between what they call the alligator line and the snow line.



    They describe some of the places they have visited and experiences they have enjoyed. The couple also explains what attracted them to the RV lifestyle and what motivates them to keep seeking new adventures. Greg and Bonnie describe some of the Workamper jobs they’ve enjoyed over the years.



    At their last Workamping gig, they met a woman who introduced the Dixons to the multi-level marketing company LifeWave, which is based in San Diego. The firm sells products that employ phototherapy and acupressure to help people heal and maintain their health.



    Bonnie worked as a buyer in the natural products industry for more than 25 years. So, she said she was very familiar with many types of alternative health products. But, when she learned about LifeWave, Bonnie found it to be a very effective product and a sustainable business that she could operate from the RV.



    She describes how the product works and the affect it can have on people who use it. Both Bonnie and Greg explain how the business works and how other people can tap into the opportunity.



    The Dixons have been so successful with their business that they launched a website called Healthy Wealthy Camper.



    I don’t think we give natural products enough credit for helping to maintain healthy bodies and minds. That’s why I like that the Dixons have found something simple, but naturally based, that doesn’t require a lot of money to use. The patches they sell promise to improve sleep, give people energy and generally improve their health.



    As a business, it’s a good one for RVers to investigate because it doesn’t require maintaining an inventory and it is fully portable, meaning that wherever they park their RV, they’re in business. The sales are done online and, as consultants, Greg and Bonnie can talk to people in person, over the phone or through video conferencing.



    The Dixons said that medical professionals have embraced the products for their healing qualities. Using light therapy sounds different, but for so many people who are couped up in their homes and offices without access to natural light, it may be what they’re looking for.



    Remember, it is a business and in order to be successful, you have to treat it like a business in finding new customers and servicing existing clients. It costs just $25 to get started and, according to the Dixons, people can make enough to have some spending cash, even make an RV payment or fully support themselves on the road.



    For more information about what the Dixons call a “business in a box,” visit www.healthywealthycamper.com.



    Today’s show is sponsored by the Small Business RVer School. This new course from Workamper is designed specifically for entrepreneurs on the move and helps you build a business you can run anytime from anywhere.



    The self-directed course helps you be your own boss while reducing stress and saving on taxes. Through a series of online videos, and monthly calls, you are taught the steps necessary to build and manage a successful mobile business.



    Life is too short. So, choose what you want to do and when you want to do it by starting a business of your own. For more information, visit www.smallbizrver.com.

    • 39 min
    Janice Brea & Dena Farbman discuss transcription opportunities for Workampers with eScribers on Episode 121

    Janice Brea & Dena Farbman discuss transcription opportunities for Workampers with eScribers on Episode 121

    Today I will be speaking with two women who work for a legal transcription company that is looking for a number of Workampers who want to work remotely wherever they travel.



    Janice Brea is a recruiter with eScribers and Dena Farbman is a Workamper who has been supporting her travel lifestyle by doing legal transcriptions for quite some time.



    In the past, courts relied on stenographers to record every word of a legal proceeding. Today, judges and attorneys rely on digital recordings made from several microphones. Then, transcribers capture the conversations in written form as part of the legal record.



    It’s an important job because each hearing has to be clearly transcribed word for word. eScribers developed tools to format the transcriptions in a specific way that can be used by courts and official agencies. However, the company provides training and software to transcribers to help them capture the proceedings.



    There can be some tough legal language to understand, but Janice said transcribers pick that up over time. In the beginning, they are assigned cases where legal language isn’t used as often, such as small claims court or other government meetings.



    Because the transcription is so important, the company uses proofreaders to verify the text. Each transcriber is assigned to a specific proofer who helps ensure they not only capture the language accurately, but also transcribe the hearing in the correct format.



    Once transcribers are comfortable in performing the work, then they can branch out into other jurisdictions where even more work is available.



    eScribers has punctuation and grammar courses available online to help transcribers get up to speed. In fact, the company seems to be very patient in helping new transcribers become proficient in their work.



    There is an unlimited amount of work available, so people can work as little as three hours a day, eight hours a day or as long as they’d like because the transcribers are independent contractors. That means, they are self-employed in their own businesses, which entitles them to enjoy a variety of tax deductions, too.



    Workampers will have to have a laptop, headphones and a foot pedal, but the equipment is not that expensive to acquire.



    Dena likes boondocking, which means she is not hooked up to campground electricity nor campground internet services. Still, eScribers gives her the flexibility to spend time traveling all over America. eScribers has supported her travel lifestyle for more than a year and a half.



    She set up a tiny workspace in her van and utilizes a Weboost signal booster to download files and upload transcriptions.



    Legal transcription is more challenging than data entry, yet it still requires Workampers to be comfortable using computers and software. eScribers trains transcriptionists how to use macros and other tools to speed their work and ensure transcripts are properly formatted.



    The only really important skill is that transcribers have command of the English language. So, if English isn’t your native language, this might not be a good opportunity for you.



    Workampers are compensated at a rate of $1.10 to $2 per page, depending upon the deadline. Still, it is possible for independent contractors to earn $12 to $20 per hour. They’ll make less while they are learning the system, but once they get up to speed within a few weeks, it sounds like an opportunity to make money indoors, at your own pace, wherever you may be parked.



    For more information about the company, visit www.escribers.net. If you’d like to apply to become a transcriber, visit www.escribers.

    • 41 min
    Episode 120 features Ed Bridgman, developer of Homestead RV Community near Mobile, Ala.

    Episode 120 features Ed Bridgman, developer of Homestead RV Community near Mobile, Ala.

    This week I am interviewing a campground owner from Mobile, Ala., who is looking for Workampers to serve at what he describes as the most technologically-advanced RV community in the world.



    Ed Bridgman is the owner and developer of Homestead RV Community, which is about 20 miles south of Mobile, Ala., and less than two miles from the Gulf of Mexico.



    Using a high-speed fiber optic network, the RV park offers the fastest internet service available and monitors water and electricity consumption at every site from a remote location. It automatically reads the meters and calculates rates without any human intervention. Even the laundry machines are controlled by an app.



    If people want to buy firewood or anything from the store, it is all done online and Workampers deliver it to the customer’s campsite a few minutes later. All communications are preformed virtually, including making reservations, payments, checking in and checking out.



    However, Workampers still provide personal attention by escorting guests to their sites, helping them connect to services and even hosting campwide events like movie nights, tournaments and special meals. They also perform landscaping duties and strike up conversations with guests who are looking for recommendations on things to do.



    Ed needs a couple to work about 25 hours per week, and no special skills are required. In exchange, they get a 40-by-82-food RV site with a 20-by-70-foot concrete pad, full connections and super-fast internet service.



    This is the first year the RV community has utilized Workampers at the year-round 59-site park. Ed is looking for people he does not have to micro-manage. Rather, he likes to work with people who can see something that needs to be done and jump right in and do it. He also likes to employ people who have a good sense of humor.



    Ed designs RV destinations around the country, so he is very familiar with what customers want and how campgrounds can provide that level of service. He expects that once Workampers spend time at his park that they will be able to go to work at other RV destinations that he has developed.



    There are a lot of things for Workampers to do near Homestead RV Community, like hiking, biking, canoeing and kayaking. The largest fishing rodeo in the world takes place just a few miles away on Dauphin Island and it attracts 3,000 anglers and more than 75,000 spectators in July.



    The Audubon Bird Sanctuary attracts hundreds of bird species along the 14-mile barrier island. The RV park is just over an hour from Pensacola, Fla., and the panhandle of that state. New Orleans is about two hours away, and there is a variety of activity to do there from Mardi Gras to the National World War II Museum.



    Ed said the weather in that part of Alabama is near-perfect every day. Because it is a year-round park, Workampers can stay as long as they’d like.



    For more information or to apply, people can email Ed at EOB@EOB.name. He will send them a standard questionnaire to complete. Then, he’ll go over that questionnaire with Workampers to determine if the opportunity is a win-win for everyone. For more information about Homestead RV Community, visit www.homervc.com. People can also call Ed  at 512-785-1379.



    Today's episode is sponsored by The Dreamer’s Journey, an online course produced by Workamper News. Life is way too short to keep your dreams on hold, so don’t be held back by fear because you were designed for more!  Get started with the RV lifestyle the right way with this comprehensive guide.



    For just $29.95 for 90 days access, Dreamers have unlimited viewing of 50+ videos to learn things like what type of RV to buy, goal setting, how to budget for the adventure, developing a positive mindset,

    • 36 min

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