23 episodes

How can you unlock creativity and imagination to inspire, teach and lead? What mental models do some of the world’s brightest minds use to supercharge their creativity, and strengthen their most precious collaborations? Along the way you’ll discover that achieving greatness doesn’t require genius. Instead, dedication to a simple set of principles—habits and tools -- can boost your creativity, stoke your imagination, and unlock your full potential for out-of-this-universe success.

On this podcast you’ll discover why Nobel Prize-winning scientists credit the often-overlooked “soft skills” such as communication, motivation, and introspection as keys to their success. You’ll see why they turn to curiosity, beauty, serendipity, and joy when they need to turn fresh eyes on some of the universe’s most vexing problems...and how you can too no matter what you do!
Get the book here!

Think Like A Nobel Prize Winner Brian Keating

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 22 Ratings

How can you unlock creativity and imagination to inspire, teach and lead? What mental models do some of the world’s brightest minds use to supercharge their creativity, and strengthen their most precious collaborations? Along the way you’ll discover that achieving greatness doesn’t require genius. Instead, dedication to a simple set of principles—habits and tools -- can boost your creativity, stoke your imagination, and unlock your full potential for out-of-this-universe success.

On this podcast you’ll discover why Nobel Prize-winning scientists credit the often-overlooked “soft skills” such as communication, motivation, and introspection as keys to their success. You’ll see why they turn to curiosity, beauty, serendipity, and joy when they need to turn fresh eyes on some of the universe’s most vexing problems...and how you can too no matter what you do!
Get the book here!

    Part 2: Sir Roger Penrose & Stuart Hameroff: What is Consciousness?

    Part 2: Sir Roger Penrose & Stuart Hameroff: What is Consciousness?

    A conversation with Nobel Prize Winner and renowned mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose and anesthesiologist Dr. Stuart Hameroff about consciousness and quantum mechanics.
    Sir Roger Penrose and Dr. Stuart Hameroff have tackled one of the most vexing problems in science -- how does consciousness work? Their theories of consciousness were selected by the Templeton Foundation for study. We will discuss Is the brain a sophisticated computer or an intuitive thinking device? Following on from their conference in Tucson which pitted Integrated Information Theory (IIT) against Orchestrated Objective Reduction (Orch-OR), Sir Roger Penrose OM and Stuart Hameroff discuss the current state of theories that might explain human consciousness and objections to them from FQXI and others.
    Sir Roger Penrose describe examples of ‘non-computability’ in human consciousness, thoughts and actions such as the way we evaluate particular chess positions which cast doubt on ‘Turing’ computation as a complete explanation of brain function. As a source of non-computability, Roger discuss his ‘objective reduction’ (‘OR’) self-collapse of the quantum wavefunction which is a potential resolution for the ‘measurement problem’ in quantum mechanics, and a mechanism for non-computable physics.

    Dr. Stuart Hameroff reviews neuronal and biophysical aspects of Orch OR, in which ‘orchestrated’ quantum vibrations occur among entangled brain microtubules and evolve toward Orch OR threshold and consciousness. The nature, feasibility, decoherence times and evidence for quantum vibrations in microtubules, their role and correlation with consciousness, effects upon them of anesthetic gases and psychedelic drug molecules will be discussed, along with Orch OR criticisms and predictions of microtubule quantum vibrations as therapeutic targets for mental and cognitive disorders.
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    • 1 hr 16 min
    Part 1: Sir Roger Penrose & Stuart Hameroff: What is Consciousness?

    Part 1: Sir Roger Penrose & Stuart Hameroff: What is Consciousness?

    A conversation with Nobel Prize Winner and renowned mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose and anesthesiologist Dr. Stuart Hameroff about consciousness and quantum mechanics.
    Sir Roger Penrose and Dr. Stuart Hameroff have tackled one of the most vexing problems in science -- how does consciousness work? Their theories of consciousness were selected by the Templeton Foundation for study. We will discuss Is the brain a sophisticated computer or an intuitive thinking device? Following on from their conference in Tucson which pitted Integrated Information Theory (IIT) against Orchestrated Objective Reduction (Orch-OR), Sir Roger Penrose OM and Stuart Hameroff discuss the current state of theories that might explain human consciousness and objections to them from FQXI and others.
    Sir Roger Penrose describe examples of ‘non-computability’ in human consciousness, thoughts and actions such as the way we evaluate particular chess positions which cast doubt on ‘Turing’ computation as a complete explanation of brain function. As a source of non-computability, Roger discuss his ‘objective reduction’ (‘OR’) self-collapse of the quantum wavefunction which is a potential resolution for the ‘measurement problem’ in quantum mechanics, and a mechanism for non-computable physics.
    Dr. Stuart Hameroff reviews neuronal and biophysical aspects of Orch OR, in which ‘orchestrated’ quantum vibrations occur among entangled brain microtubules and evolve toward Orch OR threshold and consciousness. The nature, feasibility, decoherence times and evidence for quantum vibrations in microtubules, their role and correlation with consciousness, effects upon them of anesthetic gases and psychedelic drug molecules will be discussed, along with Orch OR criticisms and predictions of microtubule quantum vibrations as therapeutic targets for mental and cognitive disorders.
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    Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/drbriankeating

    • 31 min
    James Webb Space Telescope First Results Q & A with Project Scientist John Mather, Nobel Prizewinner

    James Webb Space Telescope First Results Q & A with Project Scientist John Mather, Nobel Prizewinner

    @NASAWebb Senior Project Scientist, and @NobelPrize winner, John Mather answers questions about the JWST from listeners of Into The Impossible.
    📺 Watch my #JWST explainer here https://youtu.be/1MjR_A5oDyI
    Please join my mailing list; for your chance to win 4 billion year old space dust click here 👉 briankeating.com/list 📝
    Get your copy of Think Like a Nobel Prize Winner here: https://urlgeni.us/amzn/TLANPW 
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    A production of http://imagination.ucsd.edu/
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    • 35 min
    The Elusive Higgs Boson: Frank Close

    The Elusive Higgs Boson: Frank Close

    Elusive: How Peter Higgs Solved the Mystery of Mass marks the 10th anniversary of the discovery of the Higgs Boson. On July 4, 2012, the announcement came that one of the longest-running mysteries in physics had been solved: the Higgs boson, the missing piece in understanding why particles have mass, had finally been discovered. On the rostrum, surrounded by jostling physicists and media, was the particle’s retiring namesake—the only person in history to have an existing single-particle named for them. Why Peter Higgs? Drawing on years of conversations with Higgs and others, Close illuminates how an unprolific man became one of the world’s most famous scientists. Close finds that scientific competition between people, institutions, and states played as much of a role in making Higgs famous as Higgs’s work did.
    Author of 20 books about science, Frank Close is Professor Emeritus of Theoretical Physics and Fellow Emeritus at Exeter College. He was formerly Head of the Theoretical Physics Division at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, vice President of the British Science Association, and Head of Communications and Public Understanding at CERN. He was awarded the Kelvin Medal of the Institute of Physics for his 'outstanding contributions to the public understanding of physics' in 1996, an OBE for 'services to research and the public understanding of science' in 2000, and the Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize for communicating science in 2013. He is the only professional physicist to have won a British Science Writers Prize on three occasions.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Nobel Prize Winner Adam Riess: The Hubble Tension is Getting WORSE!

    Nobel Prize Winner Adam Riess: The Hubble Tension is Getting WORSE!

    Chat with Nobel Prize winner Adam Riess about his team's newest measurements of the 'most important number in cosmology' the Hubble Constant. Using the Hubble Space Telescope for what it was meant to do, Adam's team continues to make ultra-precise measurements. We'll also explore the Hubble Tension, the future of Hubble now that the James Webb Space Telescope has deployed, and other cosmic conundrums. Adam is a brilliant teacher and a wonderful raconteur. Don't miss your chance to chat with a brilliant scientist about the most important topic in cosmology today!
    From the team: https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-releases/2022/news-2022-005
    From CNN:
    Measuring the expansion rate of the universe was one of the Hubble Space Telescope’s main goals when it was launched in 1990. Over the past 30 years, the space observatory has helped scientists discover and refine that accelerating rate – as well as uncover a mysterious wrinkle that only brand-new physics may solve.
    Hubble has observed more than 40 galaxies that include pulsating stars as well as exploding stars called supernovae to measure even greater cosmic distances. Both of these phenomena help astronomers to mark astronomical distances like mile markers, which have pointed to the expansion rate.
    In the quest to understand how quickly our universe expands, astronomers already made one unexpected discovery in 1998: “dark energy.” This phenomenon acts as a mysterious repulsive force that accelerates the expansion rate.
    And there is another twist: an unexplained difference between the expansion rate of the local universe versus that of the distant universe right after the big bang.
    Scientists don’t understand the discrepancy but acknowledge that it’s weird and could require new physics.
    “You are getting the most precise measure of the expansion rate for the universe from the gold standard of telescopes and cosmic mile markers,” said Nobel Laureate Adam Riess at the Space Telescope Science Institute and a distinguished professor at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, in a statement.
    “This is what the Hubble Space Telescope was built to do, using the best techniques we know to do it. This is likely Hubble’s magnum opus, because it would take another 30 years of Hubble’s life to even double this sample size.”
    Adam Guy Riess (born December 16, 1969) is an American astrophysicist and Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute. He is known for his research in using supernovae as cosmological probes. Riess shared both the 2006 Shaw Prize in Astronomy and the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics with Saul Perlmutter and Brian P. Schmidt for providing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating.

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    Produced by Stuart Volkow (P.G.A) and Brian Keating

    Edited by Stuart Volkow

    Music: 

    Yeti Tears Miguel Tully - www.facebook.com/yetitears/

    Theo Ryan - http://the-omusic.com/

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Jocelyn Bell Burnell: Mentors, Pulsars & Prizes

    Jocelyn Bell Burnell: Mentors, Pulsars & Prizes

    In 1967, Jocelyn Bell Burnell made an astounding discovery. On 28 November 1967, she detected a "bit of scruff" on her chart-recorder papers that tracked across the sky with the stars. The signal had been visible in data taken in August, but as the papers had to be checked by hand, it took her three months to find it. She established that the signal was pulsing with great regularity, at a rate of about one pulse every one and a third seconds. Temporarily dubbed "Little Green Man 1" (LGM-1) the source (now known as PSR B1919+21) was identified after several years as a rapidly rotating neutron star.
    But as a young woman in science, her role was overlooked. Today's discussion is with one of the foremost astronomers of our time in a deep and revealing interview that shares a more personal side of her than ever before. In addition to describing her experimental research, we describe the surprising initial reaction to what was initially thought to be aliens, or Little Green Men.
    Since then we reveal what we've learned about fascinating pulsars as well as what that may reveal about life in the universe. We also chat about her religion (Quaker) and mine (Jewish) and how her view of God has evolved. We discuss her book "A Quaker Astronomer Reflects: Can a Scientist also be Religious? ", the Multiverse and Quakers: influence of mentors like Sir Fred Hoyle, the Nobel Prize and answer audience questions.
    Dame Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell DBE FRS FRSE FRAS FInstP is an astrophysicist from Northern Ireland who was president of the Royal Astronomical Society from 2002 to 2004, president of the Institute of Physics from October 2008 until October 2010, and interim president of the Institute following the death of her successor, Marshall Stoneham, in early 2011.
    In 2018, she was awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Following the announcement of the award, she decided to use the £2.3 million prize money to establish the Bell Burnell Graduate Scholarship Fund, to help female, minority and refugee students become physics researchers. The fund is administered by the Institute of Physics.
    Bell on God "Recognising that there was not going to be any proof of the existence of God, I decided many years ago to adopt as a ‘working hypothesis’ the assumption that there was a God, a God that I will describe below, and to see how I got on with this picture of God. Perhaps evidence would accumulate that would lead me to decide that the hypothesis was wrong, that there was no God, or that God was very different from what I had imagined."

    • 1 hr 4 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

For the rep ,

Noble Nobelists

Love all these insights from geniuses

emilyoundinsd ,

Love Nobel prize wisdom

Keep it up Brian

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Never miss an episode

I can’t get enough. love learning about physics as I don’t know as much as Brian but thanks to his guests I am learning !

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