100 episodes

Weird Scenes: Drop in for a spell, and join hosts "Doc" Savage and Louis Paul as we dig deep into the rich vein of cult cinema, music and television, right here on Weird Scenes inside the Goldmine!


Third Eye Cinema: Your source for in depth discussion of cult cinema and music, with a focus on film that matters: cult, grindhouse, drive-in, independent and underground film from the dawn of the talkies through the early nineties.

We also cover all the best in cult and underground music, with a focus on only the best in global metal, gothic rock and punk, digging deep into band histories and discography to address those unanswered questions and put to bed some longstanding rumors, assumptions and dirt in conversations with the men and women who were there to know what really went down.

Third Eye Cinema / Weird Scenes Inside the Goldmine podcast thirdeyecinema

    • TV & Film
    • 4.7 • 3 Ratings

Weird Scenes: Drop in for a spell, and join hosts "Doc" Savage and Louis Paul as we dig deep into the rich vein of cult cinema, music and television, right here on Weird Scenes inside the Goldmine!


Third Eye Cinema: Your source for in depth discussion of cult cinema and music, with a focus on film that matters: cult, grindhouse, drive-in, independent and underground film from the dawn of the talkies through the early nineties.

We also cover all the best in cult and underground music, with a focus on only the best in global metal, gothic rock and punk, digging deep into band histories and discography to address those unanswered questions and put to bed some longstanding rumors, assumptions and dirt in conversations with the men and women who were there to know what really went down.

    Weird Scenes Week 85 (12/9/21): Go Ape! The first major multimedia craze and how it disappeared into the vaults of time

    Weird Scenes Week 85 (12/9/21): Go Ape! The first major multimedia craze and how it disappeared into the vaults of time

    We’d talked the early, more progressively minded SF of Charlton Heston in a recent show, and the life and career of the ubiquitous Roddy MacDowall not very long ago.  One series of films notable for featuring both iconic actors in primary roles remained glossed over, however, despite spurring a personal revisitation of the original 5 film run after the MacDowall chat.  Unaddressed, that is, until now.


    Marked by a then relevant if somewhat naïve by modern standards allegorical exploration of race relations and nuclear brinksmanship, the series was a true cause celebre in its heyday, resulting in all sorts of spinoff items: MEGOs, action figures, comic magazines, paperback novellas, a popular book and record series, games, jigsaw puzzles and plastic models, even a short lived TV series.  Like the later Star Wars, the Apes were inescapable throughout the early to mid 70’s…then, just like that?  Utterly forgotten.


    Despite a post millennial attempt to revive the series in a disturbingly far lesser CG based trilogy of films, the Apes films seem locked in time, a 70’s concern that left a huge mark only to disappear, seemingly without trace.


    What happened?  How did such a force of culture defining cinema, rivaled only by the Bond series, smaller scale works like the Six Million Dollar Man/Bionic Woman franchise and the brief popularity of blustery stuntman Evel Knievel for its sheer broad impact, simply drop off the radar, seldom if ever to be referenced again?


    And then, seemingly out of the blue, comes that 2011 reboot series…


    So join us tonight as we pick some nits off each other, and speak once again of those hoary days before Spielberg and Lucas turned cinema into a wasteland of brainless popcorn fare, and realize that 40 plus years back, this was about as lowbrow and brainless as things were ever likely to get.  


    My, how things have changed... 



    Week 85: Go Ape! The first major multimedia craze and how it disappeared into the vaults of time


     


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    • 1 hr 19 min
    Weird Scenes Week 84 (11/11/21): Questions Within Enigma: the films of Stanley Kubrick

    Weird Scenes Week 84 (11/11/21): Questions Within Enigma: the films of Stanley Kubrick

    Born and raised in the Bronx, Stanley Kubrick started off as a photographer for magazines noted for such like Look, and that’s something that carried through in most dramatic fashion in his subsequent film career.


    Almost uniquely in Hollywood, he managed to move from totally self-produced outsider cinema to decades funded by more traditional channels…and yet otherwise entirely self-directed, produced, scripted and more.  The man managed to have a cottage industry for his films, allowing for more quirks and control over the final product than even much feted auteurist directors like Hitchcock have ever been able to claim.  


    And yet, for all that financial and distribution advantage and personal control, he really seemed to choose some questionable material to tackle, and while much feted with awards and accolades, delivered a stream of very rocky pictures, more head scratching if visually sumptuous misses than enduring hits.  His demanding nature led to many a conflict with his casts, and where most directors of his era easily produced twice if not three times as many films within the same span of time, he ultimately only dropped a handful of films, whose ultimate merit is all over the map.


    Ultimately, all he left us was a trio of awkward no budget noir crime films in the 50s, a few scandalous oddities in the 60’s and very early 70s, one dour historical that lacked either enough erotic or comic content to link it to the trend, a much beloved if unusual horror film of sorts and literally one film each in his two final decades: one attempt to tackle the then de rigeur Vietnam reminiscence and one seemingly Decadent erotic horror that attaches the expected spice to the tangled occult skein of films like The Order to the Ice Storm like loss of passion in a marriage and how a trip to the edge and near misses with realistic consequences (like nearly spending the night with an HIV positive partner) bring a straying couple back home to each other.  


    Join us tonight as we talk one of the most praised yet controversial and ultimately in most ways quite spotty directors in American cinema, the one and only Stanley Kubrick, right here on Weird Scenes.   


    Week 84: Questions Within Enigma: the films of Stanley Kubrick 


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    • 1 hr 59 min
    Weird Scenes Week 83: SF with a message - the dystopic visions of the counterculture era

    Weird Scenes Week 83: SF with a message - the dystopic visions of the counterculture era

    It's hard to believe in the modern age of sheer bombast and explosion filled CG lightshows for their own sake, but not that long ago, the world of science fiction, yes, even that of the American cinema, tended to be devoted to a very different purpose and aesthetic.


    Like their low paid visionary scribes from the likes of Welles and Verne in the 1800s to the pulps of the 20's and 30's and the edge of current science devotees and aspirationists of the 1950s, the science fiction authors of the 1960s and early 70's had far more in mind than a cheap hour or two of mindless escapism from an increasingly dreary corporatocratic nightmare world we've all come to accept as if it were predestined master rather than an out of control dog to be brought to heel.


    For a few decades in particular, a hard SF mix of utopian aspiration and dystopian commentary and warning about then-new trends arising in contemporary society informed nearly every instance of same, from the lowest of budget to the highest of the highbrow, from the critically feted to the mocked and hated.  


    Many of these names have gone on into legend: Orwell, Bradbury, Ellison, Ballard, Dick, Zelazny.  And many films built off or inspired by such literary works have held their place in pop culture circles: The Planet of the Apes films, 2001: A Space Odyssey...and many of the otherwise unrelated films we'll be discussing this evening, like Fahrenheit 451, The Illustrated Man, The Omega Man, Soylent Green, Silent Running, A Boy and His Dog and Damnation Alley.


    So join us tonight as we speak of those hoary days before Spielberg and Lucas turned cinema into a wasteland of brainless popcorn fare, and realize just how many of the horrors warned against may already have come into being in our day and age, begging the question: why didn't we listen?  Come and see what answers await, as we talk the thought provoking dystopias of the counterculture era, right here on Weird Scenes!


    Week 83: SF with a message - the dystopic visions of the counterculture era 


     


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    • 2 hr 17 min
    Week 95 (10/17/21) - Show-Ya (and special guest)

    Week 95 (10/17/21) - Show-Ya (and special guest)

    This week, join us as we speak to pioneering all-femme Japanese hard rock/heavy metal band Show-Ya!


    Dropping no less than 8 solid albums of smooth yet punchy keyboard and guitar driven hard rock leaning ever more towards metal between 1985 and 1990, bluesy frontwoman Keiko Terada and "the three Mikis" ("Captain" Nakamura, "Sun-Go" Igarashi and "Mittan" Tsunoda) alongside Satomi Senba on bass were so well beloved as to be tapped for a major Coca Cola campaign in the days when rock and metal were still considered "scary" persona non grata to mainstream society.


    Over the course of a mere 5 years, the unusually prolific band subtly shifted style from their very anime style early sound to something more akin to American metal and even a bit of the Hollywood Guns N Roses sound (on the English lyriced songs of Hard Way) before Terada departed for a successful solo career.


    Soldiering on for two further releases with fellow J-rock maiden Steffanie (Borges) and the punkier Yoshino, Show-Ya finally closed up shop in the 90's.


    But a 20th reunion tour of the original lineup in 2005 led to renewed interest in the band, inclusive of two successive sets of remasters (the latter with bonus tracks like the aforementioned Coke commercial, surprisingly catchy tune that it is), and by 2012 they were back in studio, releasing material that sounded surprisingly like their mid 80s heyday, and even an all covers album that features their takes on hits from nearly every great J-rock and J-metal band of the 80's and 90's, from Luna Sea, X and Kyosuke Himuro's Boowy to Loudness, Earthshaker, Glay and L'Arc en Ciel.


    Now partnering with Blizard's Nozumu Wakai as songwriting partner and producer, they've released an album that simultaneously sounds familiar and uniquely new in Showdown, which gets international release through Metalville this coming month.


    Join us as we have a brief if entertaining and decidedly good humored chat with Keiko Terada and "Captain" Miki Nakamura (plus surprise guest Mirai Kawashima of Sigh, of all people!) only here on Third Eye Cinema!


    Week 96: Show-Ya


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    • 31 min
    Weird Scenes Week 82 - Ridin' the Rails with Rob: the unflappable cool of Robert Mitchum

    Weird Scenes Week 82 - Ridin' the Rails with Rob: the unflappable cool of Robert Mitchum

    Starring in at least 12 films that are or have been associated with the Film Noir genre (a retroactive designation courtesy of France’s Cahiers du Cinema crowd covering American B pictures with cynical, compromised heroes, vicious femme fatales and a gialloesque immersion in a dark underworld where all is not as it seems and everyone is guilty and menacing), Robert Mitchum brought a less comical, far less telegraphed Dean Martin style insouciance to his work.  


    Tall and manly enough to stand his own in a fight, yet sleepy eyed and laid back enough to be led along by the nose to his doom by the many vamps and tramps he’d encounter, much of his onscreen persona appears to have been presaged by his own life.


    The son of a working class dock worker and railroad man, he wound up living under a resented military stepfather to the point where he wound up riding the rails and bumming his way around the country in his early teens, supposedly winding up (and escaping!) Sullivans Travels style on a southern jailhouse chain gang for his efforts.


    An early advocate of the wacky weed, he wound up in prison for a second time over pot possession right in the middle of his noir career, threw a studio manager into a lake (literally) and more, in a career which at times found him working alongside two of the Gentlemen Prefer Blondes girls (Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell) and eventually starring in two much overhyped films late in the genre, Night of the Hunter and Cape Fear.  He’d then return to prominence over a decade later with three notable films in the 70’s neo noir revival before closing out on then much hyped television miniseries The Winds of War...and that stupid Bill Murray vehicle Scrooged (oy, what a way to go!)


    Join us tonight as we speak of another cinematic epitome of tough guy cool, the one and only Robert MItchum, right here on Weird Scenes!


    Week 82: Ridin' the Rails with Rob - the unflappable cool of Robert Mitchum


     


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    • 2 hr 1 min
    Weird Scenes Week 81 - Tony Curtis

    Weird Scenes Week 81 - Tony Curtis

    Born in abject poverty to a Hungarian immigrant tailor, a young Bernie Schwartz learned one of life's most important lessons at a tender age: you can't rely on anyone but yourself.  


    Making his way through adversities of language, impoverishment, deaths of loved ones and even a stint in an orphanage, he turned things around after service in the military, using the G.I. Bill to fund his attendance in acting school.  One quick change of name, and straight out of some absurd Horatio Alger story, he wound up fast tracked to Hollywood and fame.


    Following a run of big budget historical epics, he found a niche in fluffy, sexless comedies, somewhere between the goofy antics of Martin and Lewis and the pillow talk of Rock Hudson and Doris Day.  Young, handsome and affable, he became a darling of the teenage fanclub set, to the point where he even spoofed himself on an episode of the Flintstones, voicing a thinly veiled cartoon analogue.  
    Falling on hard times and still striving for stretch roles outside this typecast safe zone, he wound up shaking the tree in extremis with a dramatization of early serial killer Albert DeSalvo, finding himself critically acclaimed...but seemingly unable to  land further roles of note.  Struggling with drug use, he still managed to bring a unique character and often riveting if decidedly off kilter sensibility to films as diverse and often absurd as The Bad News Bears Go to Japan, The Manitou and the Mae West oddity Sextette.


    Turning increasingly to television in his later years, he used a sleazy Hollywood gossip show as a platform to share some wholly unrelated memories of his past career, drumming up enough interest to publish a successful autobiography and launch a late sideline in painting, before taking one last truly bizarre turn at the very end of his life...


    Join us tonight as we speak to the quirky, often questionable but undeniably loveable Tony Curtis, only here on Weird Scenes!


    Week 81: Bronx Boy Breaks Box Office - the unusual tale of Tony Curtis



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    • 2 hr 19 min

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