38 episodes

Each week we sit down with today’s most relevant urban thinkers to discuss the forces and trends molding our modern cities. From planning, policy, and design, to nomad cities, AI and automation, health and wellbeing, architecture, housing and beyond, we cover urbanity from all angles. Shaping better cities for all, one episode at a time.

Brought to you by NewCities.

threesixtyCITY NewCities

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Each week we sit down with today’s most relevant urban thinkers to discuss the forces and trends molding our modern cities. From planning, policy, and design, to nomad cities, AI and automation, health and wellbeing, architecture, housing and beyond, we cover urbanity from all angles. Shaping better cities for all, one episode at a time.

Brought to you by NewCities.

    37 | Designing Cities That Care with Alexandra Lange

    37 | Designing Cities That Care with Alexandra Lange

    “Care” has become urbanists’ watchword of late, nearly two years after the pandemic exposed a crisis of care for children, seniors, and cities alike. More recently, the urban designer Justin Garrett Moore has called for a “Department of Care” to manage the public realm, while new models of care-based cohousing are among the exhibits on display at the Canadian Centre for Architecture’s new exhibit, “A Section of Now.” But what does it mean to design for care, and is this just the latest buzzword, destined to be hollowed out? For the season finale, we’re joined by Alexandra Lange, author of The Design of Childhood, to discuss what it means to care.

    • 30 min
    36 | Seeing the Forest for the Cities with Scott Francisco

    36 | Seeing the Forest for the Cities with Scott Francisco

    All too often, cities are perceived as the opposite of nature — or at least in need of more “natural” features such as parks and green buildings. But the relationship between cities and their hinterlands is more nuanced and complex — a more urban world is also a greener one, as land preserved from development acts as a cooling force and carbon sink for a warming world. This week, we’re joined by Cities4Forest’s Scott Francisco to talk about the urban-forest continuum, his experience at COP26, and his plan to rewild Brooklyn Bridge.

    To learn more about the projects mentioned in the episode, follow @partnerforestprogram on Instagram or visit:
    partnerforests.org
    cities4forests.com
    pilot-projects.org
    brooklynbridgeforest.com

    • 36 min
    35 | The Conference To Save The World with Chante Harris

    35 | The Conference To Save The World with Chante Harris

    As the COP26 summit in Glasgow grinds toward the end of hopefully successful negotiations, a draft agreement released this week calls for an end to fossil fuels ahead of the schedule outlined in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Achieving these goals will not only require the creation of a “global carbon market” as originally outlined in Paris, but also rapid and massive changes to the built environment. In the U.S., some of these changes will be financed by the passage of President Biden’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, but trillions of dollars in additional investment is needed — a sum beyond the scope of the public sector. This week, we’re joined live from Glasgow by Chante Harris, director of climate investment and partnerships at Secondmuse, to discuss how to make COP26’s commitments a reality.

    • 28 min
    34 | Streets Are For Everything with Kay Cheng

    34 | Streets Are For Everything with Kay Cheng

    Early in the pandemic, public officials around the world seized streets from cars to create urgently needed outdoor space for recreation. Cities such as Paris, Milan, and Madrid led the way toward what some hoped would be a “15-minute city” lived locally on foot or by bicycle. But actually implementing this aspiration proved complicated — after all, we can’t all live in the center of Paris. How are cities pursuing this vision grappling with issues of equity and financing? And what does the street of the future look like beyond plywood street furniture and hastily-painted bicycle lanes? We’re joined by Kay Cheng, Spin’s Head of Streets and Equity Team and a former planner in San Francisco and New York, to discuss the micromobility company’s investments in placemaking and how it’s partnering with cities to reimagine the public realm.

    • 28 min
    33 | The Climate Disaster in Your Backyard with Daryl Fairweather

    33 | The Climate Disaster in Your Backyard with Daryl Fairweather

    One of the perversities of the American housing market is that the cities and regions most vulnerable to climate change, whether fires or floods or heat waves, are also the most popular — a trend fueled by the pandemic-era desire for space. But that’s finally beginning to change. For example, recent surveys by the real estate brokerage Redfin indicate that 75% of potential home buyers will take climate disasters into consideration when purchasing their next home. Meanwhile, changes to the National Flood Insurance Program enacted earlier this month will cause some premiums to rise as much as 1,000%. Are Americans finally waking up to climate change? And if so, where will they move next? I’m joined by Daryl Fairweather, chief economist of Redfin, to discuss how her company is putting climate risk ratings front and center — and whether home buyers will finally start to act on it.

    • 29 min
    32 | Whose Streeets? Our Streets! with Rebecca Williams

    32 | Whose Streeets? Our Streets! with Rebecca Williams

    More than a decade after “smart cities” promised to transform cities, it’s clear their killer app is surveillance. For example, last summer the San Diego Police Department obtained footage of Black Lives Matter protestors from “smart streetlights” ostensibly designed for traffic control and air quality monitoring. Following shock and outrage, the Mayor of San Diego ordered the 3,000+ cameras turned off — but they stayed on, no longer collecting footage for the city or police, but for the cameras’ manufacturers. This is just one example of a whole raft of technologies — including cameras, sensors, and facial recognition — that threaten to destroy the anonymity of the public realm.

    We’re joined by Rebecca Williams, author of a recent report on smart city surveillance for the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs’ Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project, on steps communities can take to stop harmful surveillance and reassert the public’s right to the city.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Apple TV+ / AT WILL MEDIA
This American Life
Pushkin Industries
Wondery
C13Originals
iHeartPodcasts