47 min

Tiny Steps to an Immeasurably Improved Life Finding Genius Podcast

    • Medicine

Could procrastination play a starring role in anxiety and depression? For David Parker, it definitely did.
Tune in to learn how he overcame it, and discover:
Why making a to-do list might not be the best way to tackle procrastination What types of procrastination exist and why they exist How tiny accomplishments for David Parker paved the way for an immeasurably improved life Procrastination, anxiety, and depression can form a vicious loop; we feel anxious about getting something done, so we push it off and avoid it, only to feel more anxious and even depressed about having procrastinated in the first place.
When putting a line through even one task on the longest, most concise to-do list feels impossible, it may be a sign that we’ve taken the wrong approach.
Since childhood, David Parker suffered from severe anxiety and depression, and found no relief in multiple psychotherapists and antidepressants. Day after day, the strongest allure was anything and everything that could pull him away from what he actually needed to do.
“Everything looked like it was 10 miles away…everything was bleak, distant, unachievable,” says Parker.
But eventually, he embarked on a journey of intense introspection. This brought him to the realization that his tendency to procrastinate was making him miserable. And this realization led him to create the J.O.T. Method, which entails jotting down Just One Thing on the “to-do” list, and actually doing it.
Parker explains this method in detail, and explains who it can help the most.
Tune in to learn more, and be sure to check out his book, The More You Do the Better You Feel: How to Overcome Procrastination and Live a Happier Life.

Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

Could procrastination play a starring role in anxiety and depression? For David Parker, it definitely did.
Tune in to learn how he overcame it, and discover:
Why making a to-do list might not be the best way to tackle procrastination What types of procrastination exist and why they exist How tiny accomplishments for David Parker paved the way for an immeasurably improved life Procrastination, anxiety, and depression can form a vicious loop; we feel anxious about getting something done, so we push it off and avoid it, only to feel more anxious and even depressed about having procrastinated in the first place.
When putting a line through even one task on the longest, most concise to-do list feels impossible, it may be a sign that we’ve taken the wrong approach.
Since childhood, David Parker suffered from severe anxiety and depression, and found no relief in multiple psychotherapists and antidepressants. Day after day, the strongest allure was anything and everything that could pull him away from what he actually needed to do.
“Everything looked like it was 10 miles away…everything was bleak, distant, unachievable,” says Parker.
But eventually, he embarked on a journey of intense introspection. This brought him to the realization that his tendency to procrastinate was making him miserable. And this realization led him to create the J.O.T. Method, which entails jotting down Just One Thing on the “to-do” list, and actually doing it.
Parker explains this method in detail, and explains who it can help the most.
Tune in to learn more, and be sure to check out his book, The More You Do the Better You Feel: How to Overcome Procrastination and Live a Happier Life.

Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

47 min