10 episodes

Broadcast from the heart of Detroit, the Today@Wayne Podcast presents insightful interviews with Wayne State University administrators, faculty, staff and other experts about the news, research and issues that most impact our campus, our city and our country. Hosted by Darrell Dawsey, the podcast airs weekly.

Today@Wayne Podcast Wayne State University

    • News

Broadcast from the heart of Detroit, the Today@Wayne Podcast presents insightful interviews with Wayne State University administrators, faculty, staff and other experts about the news, research and issues that most impact our campus, our city and our country. Hosted by Darrell Dawsey, the podcast airs weekly.

    Wayne Law professor Peter J. Hammer, director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights, discusses the battle over voting rights laws

    Wayne Law professor Peter J. Hammer, director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights, discusses the battle over voting rights laws

    Episode Notes
    One of the leading voices on the economic and social issues impacting Detroit, Wayne Law professor Peter Hammer joins the Today@Wayne Podcast for a sobering discussion with host Darrell Dawsey about the growing number of voter restriction bills popping up around the country, including in Michigan, and the threat they pose to the future of voting rights — especially for voters of color.

    About
    Peter J. Hammer was named the A. Alfred Taubman Endowed Chair at Wayne State University Law School in fall 2018. Hammer has taught at Wayne Law since 2003 and is the director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights. The Keith Center is dedicated to promoting the educational, economic and political empowerment of underrepresented communities in urban areas and to ensuring that the phrase "equal justice under law" applies to all members of society. Hammer was instrumental in editing and compiling Judge Damon J. Keith's biography, Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith (2013).
    Additional Resources

    [Peter Hammer's biography](law.wayne.edu/profile/ar7084#definition-Biography)
    [Information about the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights](law.wayne.edu/keith-center)
    [Follow Wayne Law on Twitter](twitter.com/_WayneLaw)
    Selected publications
    Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith (Peter J. Hammer, ed., with Trevor W. Coleman) (Wayne State University Press) 2013
    Living on the Margins: Minorities and Borderlines in Cambodia and Southeast Asia (editor) (The Center for Khmer Studies) 2009
    Transcript
    ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Today@Wayne, a podcast that engages and informs the Wayne State University campus community with news, announcements, information and current event discussions relevant to the university's goals and mission. Today@Wayne serves as the perfect forum for our campus to begin a conversation or keep one going. Thanks for joining us.

    DARRELL DAWSEY: I'm Darrell Dawsey, and welcome to the Today@Wayne Podcast. With voter restriction bills popping up in state legislatures all across the country, including right here in Michigan, we thought today would be a fitting time to examine the issue of voting rights and where its future lies. Joining us for our discussion today is Peter J. Hammer. Peter is the A. Alfred Taubman Endowed Chair at Wayne State University Law School and the director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights, which is dedicated to promoting the educational, economic and political empowerment of underrepresented communities in urban areas, and to ensuring that the phrase "equal justice under law" applies to all members of society. Peter has become a leading voice on the economic and social issues impacting the city of Detroit. Welcome, Peter Hammer.

    PETER J. HAMMER: It's a pleasure to be here, Darrell.

    DAWSEY: All right, great to have you. We've heard a lot about what's going on in Georgia with the passage of those very restrictive laws governing the ballot. Folks can't even go give people water if they're standing in line, but right here in Michigan, we've also had several voting rights bills that are being bandied about in our state legislature. And I was hoping you could talk a little bit about some of that proposed legislation and some of the stuff that voting rights advocates specifically should be most concerned about.

    HAMMER: Well, thanks, Darrell. I want to sort of give a little bit of context. I'm thinking about how Judge Keith would approach an issue like this. And there were very few things that got him more exercised then talking about voting rights and that's because it really was the lifeblood of the civil rights movement and people fighting and dying for the right to vote. And so that always was incredibly close to his heart and something that he cared passionately about. But he would very clearly...

    WSU Law School alumnus and labor attorney Bruce Miller on his history of civil rights and labor rights advocacy

    WSU Law School alumnus and labor attorney Bruce Miller on his history of civil rights and labor rights advocacy

    Episode notes
    Legendary labor attorney and WSU Law School alumnus Bruce Miller joins Today@Wayne podcast host Darrell Dawsey for a lively look back on Miller’s decadeslong fight on behalf of civil rights, unions, and working people throughout metro Detroit and the nation.

    About
    For decades, Bruce Miller has stood with the labor and civil rights movements as an activist, advisor and attorney. He was successful in establishing the right of retired workers to draw workers’ compensation benefits. He represented employees in a case against the Ex-Cell-O company that took 12 years to litigate and resulted in awards to the plaintiffs in excess of $3 million. He has been involved in litigation throughout the country on behalf of unions and worker rights. Miller has recently been appointed as general counsel for the Metro AFL-CIO.

    In the fight for civil rights as attorney for the Detroit Branch NAACP, Miller was successful in protecting citizens from police abuse; caused the first agreement for goals and timetables at First Federal Savings and Loan Association, resulting in the first integration of the downtown banking community; outlawed the notorious Poindexter Homeowners’ Ordinance that was designed to segregate the city of Detroit; and won many other fights in the struggle for civil rights.

    Additional resources
    • Learn more about Bruce Miller and his law firm, Miller Cohen PLC
    • Read about Bruce Miller’s longtime fight for justice
    • Follow Miller Cohen PLC on Facebook

    Transcript

    Announcer:
    Welcome to Today at Wayne, a podcast that engages and informs the Wayne State University campus community. With news, announcements, information and current event discussions relevant to the university's goals and mission, Today at Wayne serves as the perfect forum for our campus to begin a conversation or keep one going. Thanks for joining us.

    Darrell Dawsey:
    Welcome to the Today at Wayne podcast. I'm Darrell Dawsey. As an attorney for the Labor Hall of Fame and general counsel for the Metro Detroit AFL-CIO in Detroit, attorney and Wayne State Law School alumnus Bruce Miller has spent nearly six decades earning a well-deserved reputation as a staunch advocate of workers' rights. Even as a student Miller found himself involved in the struggle for equal rights for all. As a high school student in Manhattan in your own 1940s, he formed the first interracial club in the school, the Brotherhood Club, after race riots broke out in the school lunch room. Miller went on to form the Interracial Youth Committee, an organization that's spread to many schools throughout New York City.

    Darrell Dawsey:
    He remained true to that mission in his professional life as well. Along with his work for local labor unions, Miller has also worked with organizations like the NAACP and others, taking up fights against police brutality, gender discrimination, and racist employment practices. The pro-labor attorney has even taken unions themselves to task, winning one of the first affirmative action cases against the Laborers Union of Michigan many years ago. Now at age 93, Miller, one of the principles of law firm Miller Cohen PLC, continues to burnish that reputation. His firm has become one of the preeminent civil rights and employment firms in Michigan, and he's joined these days by son Powell in continuing that fight to right wrongs. And we're happy to have him here with us on the Today at Wayne podcast. Welcome Bruce Miller.

    Bruce Miller:
    Well, th...

    Mike Ilitch School of Business supply chain management lecturer Kevin Ketels

    Mike Ilitch School of Business supply chain management lecturer Kevin Ketels

    Episode Notes
    In this episode, supply chain management expert Kevin Ketels, a professor at Wayne State’s Mike Ilitch School of Business, sits down with host Darrell Dawsey to assess the rebound of the supply chain in the region and country as the nation seeks to return to normal after the COVID-19 pandemic. Ketels explains why the country is on track to bounce back — but isn’t out of the woods just yet.

    About
    Kevin Ketels is a Lecturer in global supply chain management. He is the host of the annual Healthcare Supply Chain Forum and faculty lead for study abroad in Netherlands, Germany and Poland.
    For nine years, Kevin served as the CEO of KMED LLC. KMED Inventory offered health care inventory management services to hospitals and pharmacies nationally. KMED Research was a clinical research site management organization that operated clinical trials in SE Michigan on behalf of many global pharmaceutical companies.

    Kevin has more than 25 years of corporate marketing management and agency experience at companies including Dell Financial Services in Round Rock, Texas, and State Street Corp in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Additional Resources
    Kevin Ketels’ biography

    Check out Kevin Ketels on on Twitter

    Hear more from Kevin Ketels

    This podcast is hosted by ZenCast.fm

    Dr. Mark Schweitzer, Dean of the Wayne State School of Medicine

    Dr. Mark Schweitzer, Dean of the Wayne State School of Medicine

    Episode notes
    In this episode of the Today@Wayne podcast, Dr. Mark Schweitzer, new dean of the WSU School of Medicine, sits down with host Darrell Dawsey to discuss his expansive vision for the medical school, the school’s current impact on the city and state, and how medical education nationwide is being reshaped by a once-in-a-generation pandemic.

    About
    Mark Schweitzer, M.D., a preeminent radiologist, is the dean of the Wayne State University School of Medicine and vice president of health affairs for Wayne State University.

    In addition to his leadership role in the School of Medicine, as vice president of health affairs, Dr. Schweitzer works with the deans of Wayne State’s College of Nursing and Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences on clinical training issues, developing avenues to strengthen collaboration between the three schools to advance interprofessional, team-based approaches to health care.

    A medical scholar and educator, Dr. Schweitzer is an outstanding administrator who has served in many hospital and medical practice roles, including vice chair for clinical practice and chair of the information management group for Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A lecturer for Harvard Medical School, Dr. Schweitzer is extensively published and holds a number of medical patents.

    Additional resources
    Follow the WSU School of Medicine on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/WayneStateMedSchool)

    Follow the WSU School of Medicine on Twitter (https://twitter.com/waynemedicine)

    Follow the WSU School of Medicine on LinkedIn (https://www.instagram.com/waynemedicine/?hl=en)

    Transcript
    Announcer:
    Welcome to Today@Wayne, a podcast that engages and informs the Wayne State University campus community with news, announcements, information and current event discussions relevant to the university's goals and mission. Today@Wayne serves as the perfect forum for our campus to begin a conversation or keep one going. Thanks for joining us.

    Darrell Dawsey:
    Welcome to the Today@Wayne Podcast, I'm Darrell Dawsey. If the last year-plus has reminded us of anything, it's the critical importance of well-trained, dedicated medical professionals. From physicians and nurses to medical technicians and researchers, with a legacy deep rooted in educational excellence and training, the WSU School of Medicine has played a major role in staffing those professional ranks, both throughout Detroit and statewide. In fact, nearly 40% of Michigan's practicing physicians received all or part of their medical training at WSU. And, of course, this role is helping Michigan turn the tide in its fight against coronavirus, other diseases and the health disparities that come with them.

    Darrell Dawsey:
    Announced in January 2020 is the latest dean of the School of Medicine. Dr. Mark Schweitzer is the person now tasked with furthering that legacy. A preeminent radiologist, Dr. Schweitzer is — along with being the dean of the School of Medicine — also vice president of health affairs at Wayne State. Consequently, Dr. Schweitzer works with the deans of Wayne State's College of Nursing and the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences on clinical training issues, developing avenues to strengthen collaboration between the three schools to advance interprofessional team-based approaches to health care. And we've got him here with us today on the Today@Wayne Podcast. Welcome, Dr. Schweitzer.

    Mark Schweitzer:
    Thank you Darrell, happy to be here.

    Darrell Dawsey:
    All ri...

    Dr. Teena Chopra, WSU infectious diseases expert on the importance of public health policies

    Dr. Teena Chopra, WSU infectious diseases expert on the importance of public health policies

    Episode Notes
    WSU infectious diseases expert Dr. Teena Chopra shares with host Darrell Dawsey her thoughts on the nation’s progress in battling COVID-19, the urgent need to be ready for the next outbreak, and how her upbringing in India helped ready her for a medical career in Detroit.

    About
    An infectious disease specialist, Dr. Teena Chopra is a professor of internal medicine, infectious diseases, for the Wayne State University School of Medicine, as well as the corporate medical director of infection prevention and hospital epidemiology at the Detroit Medical Center. Dr. Chopra also serves on the Wayne State University Campus Restart Committee, assisting with university preparations and responses related to COVID-19. She has offered her expertise on the virus and infectious disease precautions in a number of local and national media outlets, and has been published in numerous medical journals.

    Additional Resources
    • Follow Dr. Chopra on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/teena.chopra)
    • Follow Dr. Chopra on Twitter (https://twitter.com/TeenaTchopra)
    • Check out more stories featuring Dr. Chopra

    • Healthline: How COVID-19 affects children compared to adults
    • CBC: U.S. infectious disease specialist addresses spike in COVID-19 cases in 23 states
    • The 74: Plans to administer ‘nation’s report card’ in 2021 to proceed despite concerns over reliability and funding during pandemic
    • Mlive: Michigan’s coronavirus cases have flattened in recent weeks, but don’t break out the bubbly just yet
    • Bloomberg Law: COVID-19 reinvades U.S. states that already beat it back once
    • The New York Times: Doctors heavily overprescribed antibiotics early in the pandemic
    • dBusiness: Wayne State University publishes new findings of potentially deadly bacterial infection linked to COVID-19 in older patients
    This podcast is hosted by ZenCast.fm

    • 17 min
    Ollie Johnson, Ph.D, chair of the WSU Department of African American Studies

    Ollie Johnson, Ph.D, chair of the WSU Department of African American Studies

    Episode Notes
    As Juneteenth celebrations around the country become more prominent, Ollie Johnson, Ph.D., chair of the Department of African American Studies at Wayne State, sits down with Today@Wayne Podcast host Darrell Dawsey to explain why the observance has grown in popularity and the significance it has for the current American political landscape.

    About
    Ollie Johnson is chair and professor of the Department of African American Studies at Wayne State University. Johnson has conducted extensive research on the Black political experience in the Americas. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California at Berkeley.

    Additional Resources
    Follow Ollie Johnson on LinkedIn

    Follow Ollie Johnson on Facebook

    Books by Ollie Johnson
    • Kwame Dixon and Ollie A. Johnson III, Comparative Racial Politics in Latin America (New York: Routledge, 2019)
    • Ollie A. Johnson III and Rosana Heringer, eds., Race, Politics, and Education in Brazil: Affirmative Action in Higher Education (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
    • Ollie A. Johnson III and Karin L. Stanford, eds., Black Political Organizations in the Post-Civil Rights Era (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2003)

    Follow the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences on Twitter

    Transcript
    Announcer:
    Welcome to Today at Wayne, a podcast that engages and informs the Wayne State University campus community with news announcements, information and current event discussions relevant to the university's goals and mission. Today at Wayne serves as the perfect forum for our campus to begin a conversation, or keep one going. Thanks for joining us.
    Darrell Dawsey:
    Welcome to Today at Wayne Podcast. I'm your host, Darrell Dawsey. June 19 marks the observance of an important yet too often overlooked milestone in American history — the anniversary of Juneteenth. Although President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862 and saw it enacted the following year, word of the order freeing Black people held in bondage throughout the South took years to spread.
    In fact, it wasn't until June 19, 1865, that word finally reached Galveston, Texas, a state where an estimated 250,000 people were still being subjected to the horrors of American enslavement. And even that event didn't end slavery completely; it wasn't until December 1865 that Blacks enslaved in Delaware and Kentucky were freed. The emancipation of the enslaved in Texas symbolized the ultimate death of the nation's most dehumanizing institution.
    So significant was the event that June 19 would forever be known as ‘Juneteenth.’ Fast-forward to 2021, and a growing number of Americans around the country are now joining in Juneteenth celebrations that were once very limited in scope. Here to talk with us about the surge in celebrations as well as about the significance of the holiday is Ollie Johnson, Ph.D., the chairman of the Wayne State University Department of African American Studies. The author and coauthor of multiple books, including Black Political Organizations in the Post-Civil Rights Era, Johnson is a widely respected scholar of Black history and social movements. Welcome, Dr. Johnson.
    Dr. Johnson:
    Welcome, thank you for having me.
    Darrell Dawsey:
    Absolutely, always good to talk with you, always good. So let's just jump right into it. Let's just say: What is Juneteenth? Just talk a little bit about the day itself and what it marks.
    Dr. Johnson:
    Juneteenth is a celebration of African American freedom. I li...

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