42 episodes

TotalPicture Podcast interviews thought leaders, practitioners, and vendors in HR, Talent Acquisition, Staffing, Leadership, and Innovation to provide cutting-edge content and actionable information to our listeners. We cover many of the important industry conferences including, SHRM, UNLEASH, ERE, TATech, and WOBI - World of Business Ideas. Currently, we are conducting all of our podcast and video interviews via Zoom.

TotalPicture Podcast Peter Clayton

    • Business

TotalPicture Podcast interviews thought leaders, practitioners, and vendors in HR, Talent Acquisition, Staffing, Leadership, and Innovation to provide cutting-edge content and actionable information to our listeners. We cover many of the important industry conferences including, SHRM, UNLEASH, ERE, TATech, and WOBI - World of Business Ideas. Currently, we are conducting all of our podcast and video interviews via Zoom.

    Solving the Puzzle for Professional Women to Stay In, Or Return to the Workforce

    Solving the Puzzle for Professional Women to Stay In, Or Return to the Workforce

    Boulo Solutions helps women stay in and return to the workforce by matching them with flexible roles and board opportunities. Businesses save time and money by getting matched with vetted, diverse talent in as little as 72hours

    Welcome to a CEO Insights edition of the TotalPicture Podcast, I’m your host, Peter Clayton. One of the presenters at the March HR Tech Alliances Collaboration Zone event is my guest today, Delphine Carter. She is the Founder and CEO of Boulo Solutions. Delphine is a business, product and technology leader with 10+ years of experience in a Product Management role. She has successfully built high-performing teams, pushing transformational change and applying agile practices to solve complex business challenges. The complex challenge she is leading today -- Boulo Solutions is designed to help women stay in and return to the workforce.



    According to Delphine, women leave the workforce before they hit the c-suite at 3x the rate of men. As women find non-traditional ways to use their professional skills, 3 out of 5 highly qualified women end up having non-linear careers. When women try to return to the workforce, they have little chance of being found on today’s most popular hiring platforms because of one-dimensional onboarding, no accounting for soft-skills and simple matching algorithms. But, keeping women working leads to an $842B improvement to the US economy. S&P Global stated that “More women working is the most underutilized source of growth that could send global market valuations soaring.”

    TALKING POINTS:



    * Delphine, thank you for joining me today. Give us the backstory of Boulo. Obviously, you are tackling a huge issue.

    * I imagine the pandemic has exacerbated the problem?

    * Have you had to pivot your business over the past year due to the pandemic?

    * On your website you talk about your mission of “professional achievement without compromise” can you expand on this?

    * Tell us about the tech you use to match candidates with jobs.

    * How are you attracting employers to your platform?

    * Are most of the rolls you are currently filling for project-based and temp work?

    * How are you attracting professional women to Boulo?

    * What is the application process?

    * Your website states that you offer 360-degree profiles of your candidates. How do you handle background checks, including education and employer references?

    * Are you functioning like an RPO, meaning you handle the payment and 1099’s for the women you place in temp assignments?

    * Let’s talk about onboarding, which of course has become far more challenging with remote work. Do you stay involved after the placement is made?

    * What is top priority on your to-do list?

    * What haven’t we discussed that you would like to share with the audience?

    How can our viewers connect with you?

    • 17 min
    4 Insights to Free Yourself Up from Low-Value Tasks and Be More Strategic

    4 Insights to Free Yourself Up from Low-Value Tasks and Be More Strategic

    IF YOU LEAD A TEAM OR ORGANIZATION, CHANCES ARE YOU’RE HITTING THE “CEILING OF COMPLEXITY” AS DAILY OPERATIONAL DEMANDS SUCK ALL YOUR TIME, LEAVING NO SPACE FOR STRATEGIC THINKING AND WORKING ON “NEEDLE-MOVING” INITIATIVES.



    Peter Clayton’s guest for this Career Strategy episode on The TotalPicture Media Podcast is Richard Medcalf, founder of Xquadrant and an executive coach to some of the world’s most impressive and successful CEOs and their teams. Richard shares four key insights that help his clients make real transformational progress in this area and become champions of transformational change.



    Introduction

    A common theme amongst CEOs, C-Suite leaders, and my other top performing clients: too much time in operations and not enough on strategic projects.



    How do I free myself from operational tasks to focus on more important things?

    But there are so many books out there, so many tips and tools – why is this still an issue?

    Shift 1: Stop trying to free up time

    Message: When you focus on higher-value tasks, everything becomes easier

    Story: “instant delegation mastery”

    Tool: last year/next year

    Shift 2: Examine your beliefs first

    Message: You don’t need a productivity hack, you need a mindset shift

    Story: “the high-performing janitor”

    Tool: what do I get out of this?

    Shift 3: Acceleration, not speed

    Message: You need to implement a system for getting better at getting better

    Story: “$100 hammer”

    Tool: opex vs capex

    Shift 4: Work the room

    Message: You can’t level-up without renegotiating your agreements

    Story: “the perfectly responsive CXO”

    Tool: agreement/expectation

    Resources:

    Free guide: “The Executive’s Productivity Paradigm: 4 uncommon insights to free yourself up from low value tasks and be more strategic” https://xquadrant.com/go/productivity

    Impact Multiplier CEO Podcast https://xquadrant.com/podcast/

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardmedcalf/

    • 37 min
    An In-Depth Interview with Harvard Business School Professor Frank Cespedes: Sales Management That Works

    An In-Depth Interview with Harvard Business School Professor Frank Cespedes: Sales Management That Works

    How to Sell in a World That Never Stops Changing

    Rather than moving sequentially through the sales process, buyers now progress in parallel activity streams – explore, evaluate, engage, experience – as they make a purchase decision. While selling is changing, much of the conventional wisdom about the impact of e-commerce, big data, AI, and other megatrends on sales is misleading and not supported by data, declares Harvard Business School professor Frank Cespedes.



    In SALES MANAGEMENT THAT WORKS, Cespedes separates signal from noise and truth from hype. Selling and profitable growth today involve a combination of factors: a coherent strategy, relevant hiring practices, and incentives, and ongoing performance management that motivates the right behaviors in the face of many changes outside a company’s control. Cespedes provides data, examples, diagnostics, and insights in five key areas:



    People – Hiring is tougher as selling becomes a more data-intensive activity, and companies already spend 20% more per-capita on sales training than in other functions. But most hiring and training practices only exacerbate the difficulties and, as Cespedes points out, “customer focus” remains a perennial slogan but not a behavioral reality at most firms.



    Process – Without a coherent sales model, selling is a series of individual activities. As the lines between online and in person sales are blurring, companies need to rethink—and reconstruct—their current sales models and this has implications for customer selection, deployment, metrics, and compensation plans.



    Pricing – In a changing landscape, pricing can build or destroy profits faster than almost any other business activity. Linking pricing with a value proposition, sales model, and selling behaviors is essential, and in information-rich markets price testing is especially important. The book discusses how to do that and why, despite conventional wisdom, value-pricing approaches are now more possible in many categories.



    Partners – Buying is now a dynamic process where a prospect and order touch multiple points in the distribution channel for most products and services. Hence, selling now means working with partners that are influential during the buying journey and after the sale. The options have increased, and so has the managerial complexity. Realigning the role of channels in sales programs is critical.



    Productivity – Customer acquisition plays an essential role in a company’s success, yet many C-suite leaders are out of touch with sales activities. Leaders need to close this gap and, especially in services-dominated economies like the U.S. and many other nations, increasing sales productivity is a social responsibility of management as well as essential to profitability and growth.

    • 40 min
    What Recruiters and HR Need to Know About Immigration Law in 2021

    What Recruiters and HR Need to Know About Immigration Law in 2021

    Welcome to the TotalPicture Podcast with Producer/Host Peter Clayton. Today, we’re going to focus on immigration – specifically The Diversity Immigrant Visa program, also known as the green card lottery. The Immigration Act of 1990 established the current and permanent Diversity Visa (DV) program. Joining me is Brian Fancher, the VP of I-9 Product Management and Chief Compliance Officer at Tracker, recently acquired by Mitratech.

    TALKING POINTS:



    * Brian, welcome to the TotalPicture Podcast. Tell us a little bit about your background.

    * Is Tracker operating as a separate company, or are you integrated with Mitratech?

    * Talk to us about I-9 Compliance. Specifically, what is I-9?

    * Why did Mitratech acquire your company, Tracker – and what other products and services does Mitratech offer?

    * What are some of the new reforms to the employment-based immigration system?

    * As I mentioned in my open, the Diversity Immigrant Visa program was first enacted in 1990 give us some background regarding DIV.

    * If your native country (say India), is not eligible under the DIV, are there other ways you can qualify for the Diversity Visa?

    * What are the educational requirements?

    * S. green cards might increase under the Diversity Visa Program from 55,000 to 80,000. How can HR departments work with their company legal teams to be prepared for this?

    * What are some of the changes to the E-Verify employment verification system?  How does this affect HR departments?

    * What are some other issues you see in 2021 regarding immigration compliance?

    * Since the DIV is a lottery if you applied can you check your status?

    * I’ve heard that if you’re selected in the green card lottery, it’s important to act fast, even though it could still be a year or more before you’re able to come to the US. Is that true?

    * Is it true that there are many deceptive agencies that charge fees from applicants or falsely claim to increase the applicant’s winning chances?

    * What haven't I asked that's important for our audience to know about the current immigration laws and procedures?



    BACKGROUND FROM WIKIPEDIA

    The lottery is administered by the Department of State and conducted under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). As of this year, It makes available 80,000 immigrant visas annually, (up from 55,000), and aims to diversify the immigrant population in the United States, by selecting applicants from countries with low numbers of immigrants in the previous five years. Around 12 million people applied for the lottery in 2019. The most recent entry period for the lottery was from October 7 to November 10, 2020.[1]



    Many deceptive agencies charge fees from applicants or falsely claim to increase their winning chances, but in fact the only way to apply for the lottery is to complete the entry form on the Department of State website, free of charge.



    The Immigration Act of 1990 was passed with bipartisan support and signed by President George H. W. Bush.[11] The legislation established the current and permanent Diversity Visa (DV) program, where immigrant visas are available in an annual lottery. Give us some background and history.

    • 28 min
    Bonnie Marcus – Career Strategies for Women Over 50

    Bonnie Marcus – Career Strategies for Women Over 50

    INTRODUCTION:

    Bonnie Marcus is an award-winning entrepreneur, Forbes contributing writer, and executive coach. She assists professional women to successfully navigate the workplace and position and promote themselves to advance their careers. With 20 plus years of sales and management experience, Bonnie’s extensive business background includes executive positions in startups as well as Fortune 500 companies. A certified coach, Bonnie has been honored by Global Gurus as one of the world’s top 30 coaches. Her new book is titled NOT DONE YET! How Women over 50 Regin Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power. (Amazon Affiliate Link).



    Despite advances made by women in the workplace, pay inequity and under-representation in top positions are still a reality, unfortunately, the situation looks worse for older women, who face the double whammy of gendered ageism. As a woman over 50, you may be wondering if there’s anything you can do as you face down diminished responsibilities, decreasing visibility, and the looming specter of being aged out. In her new book not done yet how women over 50 regain their confidence claim workplace power Bonnie is out to convince you that, in fact, you can do a whole lot. You can keep your job, advance your career, do the work you love and need to do, and defy all the ageist assumptions that suggest otherwise.

    TALKING POINTS



    * Tell us about your background and the inspiration to write Not Done Yet!

    * Ageism is an equal opportunity un-employer. It’s not just women, but men over 50 who are overlooked and ignored. That said, I think women still get the shorter end of the stick. Am I right?

    * What is the most important thing a woman over 50 looking for a job needs to do?

    * Then there’s the retirement conundrum. As an independent contractor, I’ve found when my primary contact leaves or retires, the person replacing him or her – i.e. the ‘client’ oftentimes is younger and wants to work with their peers, not someone who reminds them of their parents. I would guess this dynamic plays out internally as well. How do you overcome this?

    * Let’s face it Bonnie, if you’re a young, attractive woman with a great personality, that’s all you really need to get ahead in corporate America. Do you agree?

    * However, if your hair is turning grey, you’re overweight, and you’re not what most people would consider attractive, you’re basically screwed when it comes to visibility and promotion within many companies.

    * When you were doing the research for your book Not Done Yet, what were some of the issues that kept coming up over and over again for women over 50?

    * Have you seen a difference between extraverts and introverts over 50 when it comes to promotions and job security?

    * I’m going to lift one of your chapter titles for my next question: how do you respond to ageist comments without getting fired? Additionally, how do you talk to your boss about ageism and sexism?

    * Obviously, most of us are working from home. How has the pandemic affected women over 50? Have you noticed any trends? Has your coaching practice changed?

    * What did you learn that perhaps surprised you researching and writing Not Done Yet?

    * What are the two or three most important take-aways from your book?

    * I’m going to steal a couple Tim Ferriss questions: If you could have a gigantic billboard anywhere with anything on it, what would it say?

    * In the last five years, what new belief, behavior, or habit has most improved your life?



    What have I missed?

    • 33 min
    Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace

    Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace

    Welcome to an Innovation edition of the TotalPicture Podcast with your host Peter Clayton. According to my guests today, The key to advancing gender equality? Men!



    Joining me are David Smith and W. Brad Johnson, authors of Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace published by Harvard Business Review Press. David Smith is professor of sociology in the College of Leadership and Ethics at the US Naval War College, and Brad Johnson is a professor of psychology in the department of Leadership Ethics and Law at the United States Naval Academy and a faculty associate in the Graduate School of Education at John Hopkins University. They are the coauthors of Athena Rising, How and Why Men Should Mentor Women.

    TALKING POINTS:



    * Welcome, David and Brad. As the father of three girls, I was immediately drawn to Good Guys.

    * I’ve spent enough time in male-dominated industries and organizations to have seen firsthand the disadvantage women have.

    * According to the Preface of Good Guys, your book Athena Rising was the catalyst for writing your new book. Can you give us some background?

    * You interviewed a number of men and women in writing Good Guys, men who are considered to be allies to women in the workplace. According to the women you spoke to, what traits defined their male coworkers as allies? and Are there any traits that seem to be consistent across the board?

    * What surprised you, if anything, in researching and writing Good Guys?

    * The current world we’re living in seems to me to have raised a number of interesting issues directly related to gender equity. First, guess what? You can work from home and be effective. All of a sudden, the idea of everyone must come to the office to get work done has been shown to be a male fantasy. What’s your take?

    * You interviewed a number of men and women in writing Good Guys, men who are considered to be allies to women in the workplace. According to the women you spoke to, what traits defined their male coworkers as allies? and Are there any traits that seem to be consistent across the board?

    * What surprised you, if anything, in researching and writing Good Guys?

    * The current world we’re living in seems to me to have raised a number of interesting issues directly related to gender equity. First, guess what? You can work from home and be effective. All of a sudden, the idea of everyone must come to the office to get work done has been shown to be a male fantasy. What’s your take? How has the pandemic impacted gender equality?

    * Do you think work from home will help to advance gender equality? So now that everyone who can work from home is – how can men become better allies to the women they’re virtually working with?

    * You have an entire chapter titled “To Be Legit as an Ally, Start at Home,” which I think has taken on new meaning and importance. Can you share with us strategies when you have two parents working from home on Zoom calls with kids and cats and dogs and chaos on a daily basis?

    * Why do so many women choose careers in HR? Virtually every CHRO I know is a woman.

    * Last week I participated in an HR Tech Alliances Virtual event that showcased several companies in workforce analytics – or people analytics and the data these companies are able to extract and analyze is truly amazing. One company, Claro had a nifty chart called “Female Representation in the Workforce and Leadership Positions.

    * So companies being able to hide behind opaque PR is quickly becoming a thing of the past. Do you think more transparency will motivate companies to practice more gender diversity in their leadership?

    * D&I Has been a hot topic at every HR Tech and Talent Acquisition virtual event this year. Is it being discussed in universities?

    * What are the 2 or 3 most important takeaways from your book?

    • 44 min

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