141 episodes

We believe that success with ADHD is possible... with a little translation. Hosts Cameron Gott and Shelly Collins, both ADHD coaches who have plenty of insight to share navigating their own ADHD experiences, discuss how to live more authentically as an adult with ADHD and how to create real, sustained change to achieve greater success. If you are an adult with ADHD who wants more out of their business, career, and life, this is the podcast for you!

Translating ADHD Shelly Collins and Cameron Gott

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 178 Ratings

We believe that success with ADHD is possible... with a little translation. Hosts Cameron Gott and Shelly Collins, both ADHD coaches who have plenty of insight to share navigating their own ADHD experiences, discuss how to live more authentically as an adult with ADHD and how to create real, sustained change to achieve greater success. If you are an adult with ADHD who wants more out of their business, career, and life, this is the podcast for you!

    Mulligan

    Mulligan

    Hi, everyone! We had some important stuff come up, and in the name of self-care we chose to take a mulligan. We look forward to returning October 10.



    Episode links + resources:


    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly



    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:


    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 36 sec
    ADHD and Your Lived Experience: Personal Narrative

    ADHD and Your Lived Experience: Personal Narrative

    Shelly and Cam continue to explore the lived experience theme for the new season with a deep dive into personal narratives. Our personal narrative is the narrative we tell ourselves to explain a situation or rationalize a behavior - ours or someone else’s. ADHD can make it really hard to distinguish our inner dialogue from our experiences in the world. The brain works hard to ‘tell a story’ to make sense of our experiences. Sometimes it gets it right, but often it omits or adds pieces to make the information more palatable, to fit a certain story.



    Shelly and Cam share numerous client examples of how one’s own lived experience or context informs their narrative. They go on to share how coaching and therapy can help with seeing these statements for what they are - a perspective - and if this thinking is serving the client and who they are and what they are trying to achieve.



    Episode links + resources:


    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly



    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:


    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 26 min
    Is ADHD a Superpower?

    Is ADHD a Superpower?

    Cam and Shelly kick off the third season of the Translating ADHD podcast entertaining an often-asked question in ADHD circles - Is ADHD a Superpower?



    It turns out that one’s own experience or context informs how people will answer this question. Many are emphatic one way or the other - that it is totally a superpower! or that it is not at all a superpower! Shelly and Cam, in usual form, explore the nuanced middle ground and discuss superpowers in the form of strengths and how ADHD can get in the way of distinguishing, owning and stepping into one’s strengths. Shelly and Cam point to research that proves that one’s context such as race, gender and marital and economic status influence one’s outlook on their ADHD (links below). The hosts share a number of client examples and examples from their own lives to look at framing one’s ADHD experience by exploring concepts like personal preferences and identities. Most significant, the hosts introduce the theme for the start of Season 3 - Your own context matters.



    Episode links + resources:


    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly



    Flourishing Despite ADHD Article
    Positive Aspects of ADHD Article



    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:


    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 31 min
    Translating ADHD Reflections

    Translating ADHD Reflections

    As season two comes to an end, Cam and Shelly reflect on their learning over the last year in hosting the podcast together. Cam appreciates the focus on practice in the episodes and reflects how he is using this approach to develop a lighter touch on moving his own initiatives forward. Shelly shares how she let go of pursuing or achieving “at the speed of capitalism” and regaining an important perspective on what matters most for her - to have more balance in her life. 



    Both hosts share about what they are looking forward to in the next season starting September 19th - more in-depth exploration of lived experiences, especially the interplay of ADHD and other conditions like anxiety and depression. Cam is also considering tinkering with the Mt Rainier Model. Cam has picked seven archived episodes for the break. Shelly and Cam invite listeners to listen and catch up or to also take a break and rejoin them in September.



    Episode links + resources:


    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly



    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:


    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 22 min
    ADHD Interplay Overview: Physical Pain

    ADHD Interplay Overview: Physical Pain

    Individual context matters and no more when we start to look at the interplay of ADHD and other areas of challenge like trauma or depression. A recent Canadian study that reveals factors and obstacles to succeeding with ADHD is the prompt for this week’s episode. Cam and Shelly talk about how listeners can read between the lines of a study and look for information that is actionable. 



    At first glance the study reveals fixed qualities like gender and marital status that contribute to happiness and satisfaction with ADHD. Looking deeper we see the impact of comorbid conditions, trauma, history of abuse and chronic pain, and the importance of support in these areas. 



    Cam uses his recent back injury to highlight the interplay of ADHD and pain. ADHD is often an X-factor when it comes to managing other challenges, exacerbating something like depression or deepening a depressive event. Cam and Shelly talk about the significance of effective supports and what happens when those supports are taken away. Those of us with ADHD tend to downplay the challenge or whether we deserve to address the core issues. This is just the start of exploring the interplay of ADHD and individual context.



    Episode links + resources:


    Summary of Canadian Study -
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41042-022-00062-6



    ADDA Event -
    https://homecoming.add.org/



    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly



    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:


    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 26 min
    ADHD PoC Voices: Coach Marc Almodovar Shares his Own Story and Discusses Men’s Mental Health

    ADHD PoC Voices: Coach Marc Almodovar Shares his Own Story and Discusses Men’s Mental Health

    This week we are delighted to present another special episode dedicated to exploring the lived experiences of people of color with ADHD by presenting an interview with ADHD coach Marc Almodovar.

     

    Along with being a coach, Marc is an advocate for men’s mental health and runs a support group for men with fellow mental health advocate John Hazelwood. In this episode, Marc speaks about his own challenges growing up with ADHD and depression in a Hispanic community wary of mental health issues. Marc shares how his own diagnosis at 16 changed everything for him, answering so many questions, and how he found support and encouragement from his similarly wired father. Marc discusses with Cam how his desire to change the narrative on men’s mental health inspired him to share his own story of struggle and resilience and how the power of a supportive community is essential to real change.

     

    Join us in this fascinating, inspiring and far-ranging discussion with Marc Almodovar. Marc’s attitude and enthusiasm will carry you through the rest of your day!

     
    Episode links + resources:
    Marc’s Twitter feed
    ADHD Men’s Support Group
    Advocate Kofi Obeng Interview
    ADHD Parent Advocate Rhashidah Perry Jones Interview
    ADHD Coach Inger Shaye Colzie Interview
    Join the Community | Become a Patron
    Our Process: Understand, Own, Translate.
    About Cam and Shelly

     
    For more of the Translating ADHD podcast:
    Episode Transcripts: visit TranslatingADHD.com and click on the episode
    Follow us on Twitter: @TranslatingADHD
    Visit the Website: TranslatingADHD.com

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
178 Ratings

178 Ratings

MobileJoel ,

The roadmap to getting out of your head

I was diagnosed with ADHD only two weeks ago, but I've known about my symptoms all of my life.

After a shocking separation from my wife a couple of months ago (we're back together) I started doing a deep dive as to why I didn't have a clue. I realized during these two months of introspection that I had ADHD and I needed to do something about it.

I started listening to many, many podcasts, read/listened to many books... They helped "explain" what was going on. However, I kept coming to "what's next?" There's was much information on "fixes" and "workarounds," but they felt like Golf Tips. This included a revolving door of Therapists, many of them just peddling their "tips and tricks."

Through their podcast, Cam and Shelly take you on a journey of tools and framework material that you can use to construct a better roadmap to betterness today.

Mama Kym ,

Great at “Translating ADHD”!!

Listened to my first episode of Translating ADHD. I tend to like for information to be legitimate and reasonable, not hokey. So, while this podcast seems less formal than, say, an ADDITUDE expert webinar might be, I found Cam and Shelly to be incredibly thoughtful people with a real talent for communicating about ADHD. They definitely seem to "get it," and they gave me new terms/metaphors to use. In episode 145, which was a rebroadcast, they introduced the concepts of Big Brain/Fast Brain. So many insights! I loved how Cam explained that definitions of ADHD are made from the perspective of the observing clinician. You may be "inattentive type," but from your perspective, it certainly does not feel inattentive. It feels like something else...and these talented podcast hosts are really good at putting that something else into words. I can't afford coaching, but I might be attracted to trying them out for coaching if I fall into a pile of excess money someday. :)

micapodcastlistener ,

The real-deal

Never have I encountered so many insights, nuggets, realizations, assured truths than I have from listening to approximately 60 episodes (so far) of Translating ADHD (TADHD). I started at the beginning. Since receiving a diagnosis 14 years ago, and I’ve read many books and articles and have listened to many speakers. There was often some sort of disconnect once I got past the essentials. Cam and Shelly’s discussions cut deep into what it means and feels like to have ADHD. The podcast format supports detail-oriented storytelling, and they maximize it. It’s proactive and responsive (their real-time response to the burgeoning pandemic was interesting. I only wish I would’ve come across TADHD when I was suddenly working from and staying home nearly 24/7 in 2020 and early 2021).

I appreciate their avoidance of the toxic positivity I see many other so-called ADHD experts adopt. They’re real yet hopeful in their advice and approach because they’re based in science, real experience and client stories, and sensitivity. I recommend TADHD to pretty much everyone I talk to about ADHD. I feel like it could be a bit of a life-saver for many. It was for me.

You Might Also Like

William Curb
Eric Tivers
Kristen Carder
David A Greenwood
Brendan Mahan
Kate Moryoussef