6 episodes

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. TRENDS dives deep into the community's most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

TRENDS: Boulder Community Foundation + KGNU KGNU

    • News

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. TRENDS dives deep into the community's most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

    TRENDS Podcast: Census 2020

    TRENDS Podcast: Census 2020

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



    Listen to the Census 2020 TRENDS podcast episode below:



    2020 is an important year.  In November, voters will have their voices heard in the Presidential election, senate races and on many local issues. But people can also have their voices heard before the election even begins…  and that is by being counted in the census.

    However, not everyone wants to share their information with the government. While recent attempts to get a citizenship question included in the census were struck down in the courts, a feeling of distrust remains among certain communities.

    With so much at stake, local groups are mobilizing to reach out to communities that have been historically undercounted to let them know the importance of taking part.

    This time on the TRENDS podcast, a collaboration between KGNU and the Community Foundation of Boulder County, we take a look at local efforts to mobilize people to take part in the 2020 census.

    Peggy Leech of the League of Women Voters of Boulder County is one of the co-chairs of the Boulder County Nonprofit Complete County Committee, one of four countywide Complete Count Committees.



    “Colorado currently has seven representatives to Congress, says Leech. “It’s widely expected that our population has grown enough to where we’ll have eight representatives.”

    There is also a lot of money at stake in the census says Chris Barge of the Community Foundation of Boulder County.

    “There are 55 sources of federal funding that make their way into Boulder County, and this works out to about $2,300 per person per year. You multiply that by 10 years and you’re talking about $23,000 in federal funding allocation for every Boulder County resident.”



    “[The census] leads to a tremendous amount of resources for all of us, from medical and emergency services to transportation and more funding for schools and school lunches,” says Ari Gerzon-Kessler, the Director of Equity and Partnerships at BVSD.

    According to Gerzon-Kessler, “it really has ripples across our whole society in Boulder County and everywhere.”

    BVSD passed a resolution in September that made a strong commitment to encouraging all community members to participate in the census.



    Census PSA (Spanish) from JOHN WILLIAMS on Vimeo.

    At Boulder High School, Samantha Ibarra, Alison Aredondo Arellano and Paola Garcia Barron members of the Zonta or Z Club, have produced videos in English and Spanish to educate the Latinx community on the importance of the census.



    She adds that in previous years, “many Latinos weren’t aware of what the census was and how they can get involved.”

    Another group that is often undercounted are those experiencing homelessness.

    Scott Medina of the Bridge House in Boulder says it’s important to count this community as it is a recognition of their humanity.

    “So whether you’re living at an address or right now you’re experiencing homelessness, you still count as a human being,” says Medina. “So in that sense, [the census is] kind of a beautiful equalizer in that way.”

    Just like Medina,

    • 29 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Living With Disability

    TRENDS Podcast: Living With Disability

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

    Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:





    This time on the TRENDS podcast, a collaboration between KGNU Community Radio and the Community Foundation of Boulder County, we take a look at the challenges facing those with a physical disability, the issues they face and the solutions that they themselves are creating.

    Being visually impaired does not stop 82-year-old Oswaldo Gomez from getting up and helping others in the community who are struggling with physical disabilities.

    “I’m from Cuba, a professional dancer from my country. I’m working here as a volunteer because I like to give. I’m helping people.”

    Osvaldo is determined to share his talents with the community, despite his own physical challenges. Today he is teaching a Zumba class at the Applewood Living Center. Most of the people in his class are elderly, dealing with a physical disability and in wheelchairs but that doesn’t stop Oswaldo.

    “The music makes you move your body. It is what I do. They move because they sit so long in the chair. They need to move, it makes them happy.  They don’t even know they move but they move.”

    Osvaldo is visually impaired which can often lead to isolation. He has been able to stay connected to the local community through his volunteer work helping others with disabilities. He can stay connected to the outside world through adaptive technology.

    Kim Ann Wardlow is the Executive Director at the Audio Information Network of Colorado that provides audio access to print for individuals who are blind, visually impaired, or have another condition that makes reading difficult for them.

    “The seniors, if they have lost their vision later in life it’s often very difficult. They’re trying to learn many alternative techniques and ways of doing things without vision all at once. Very different from learning starting as a child and learning throughout your whole life. And that can be overwhelming in some cases. They may have other conditions that make mobility difficult. And so combining that with vision loss, it’s not unusual to see someone become isolated in their home and not getting out and about as much.”

    Of course, not everyone dealing with physical disabilities is a senior. For some, it is something that comes earlier in life. This was the experience of longtime Boulder resident, Jeannine Fox.

    “I’m fifty-three and I was diagnosed with MS in August of 2011 and my father actually had MS as well and was completely disabled, a quadriplegic, couldn’t move anything. So I’m familiar with the disease, unfortunately. And once I was diagnosed, I had to retire from doing real estate because my disability, disabled me.”

    It takes a lot of effort for Jeannine, an avid cyclist and swimmer, to get out and about, but she does it to stay connected.

    “So for longer traveling and for longer distances in town, I’m on an electric scooter, but maneuvering around town I can do on my sticks. But I move very, very slowly and the effort it takes for each step in concentrating so I don’t trip and fall means that I’m not engaging with people. And that makes me definitely feel like more of an outsider than I already feel.”

    Another way Jeannine stays connected and finds a sense of purpose is through her volunteer work at Intercambio.

    • 32 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Isolation Among Seniors

    TRENDS Podcast: Isolation Among Seniors

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

     

     

    Adults over 65 are expected to comprise 20% of Boulder County’s total population by the year 2030. Between 2020 and 2050, the county’s overall population is expected to rise by 33%, with a 58% increase in older adult population and a 244% increase in adults over 80. With an ageing population, we take a look at how many seniors in Boulder County are vulnerable to isolation.

    “You become a very solitary individual and that makes you depressed, sad, lonely and, more importantly, you wonder what it is you’re doing in your old age, why are you still around?” — Barbara Steinmetz

    82-year-old Barbara Steinmetz became aware of the danger of becoming an isolated senior when she began to lose her hearing.

    “A number of years ago, my husband was getting cancer treatment and there was a big sign at the hospital, and it said: ‘free hearing test.’ So I immediately went and I had my hearing tested, and I found that I had a severe hearing problem, and I spoke with the otolaryngologist and I said, ‘well, you know, I’ve been getting along just fine without hearing aids.’ You know, I just wanted, I just wanted the information, I wasn’t planning on doing anything and I was told that if you don’t do anything, what will happen is you will lose your cognitive skills, you will lose your brain’s ability to take in information. And in addition to that you’ll experience social isolation.”

    Social isolation is a major problem for seniors. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 11 million people aged 65 and older live alone. In fact, as people age, their likelihood of living alone increases. Children grow up and move away, sometimes a spouse or partner dies. Living alone does not necessarily mean you are isolated, but for seniors it puts you at a greater risk and that is a big concern, says neuropsychologist Dr. Naomi Rusk.

    “Isolation is one of the main causes of health problems and premature death.” — Dr. Rusk.

    A recent survey by the Boulder County Area Agency on Aging showed that 31% of older adults reported feeling lonely or isolated, and this should concern us all, says Dr. Rusk.

    “One study says that loneliness is just about as dangerous as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, which I actually thought was pretty interesting: just as dangerous as smoking 16 cigarettes a day. That gives us a context of the impact of loneliness on our actual physical health. So loneliness can affect all of these different systems in the body: heart health, cardiovascular health, mental health, depression and anxiety. It can exacerbate any mental illness we have, being alone and isolated. Just imagine you’re alone with your own thoughts. You’re alone with your own fears. You know, you’re not reaching out and you’re not being reached into either. It exacerbates mental illness; it causes, and it also perpetuates alcoholism and drug abuse. It affects our immune system. These are all systems affected by loneliness. So, we see this amazing interaction between feeling alone and the lack of purpose that you describe, and an actual impact upon our physical health. So, it turns out that loneliness isn’t just about whether or not you’re with people, because like you and I, we’ve all had that feeling of if you’re at a party, you could feel very alone. So, loneliness also has to do with not just how many people are around us, but how connected we feel when we’re with people. So, it’s important to n

    • 28 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Mobile Home Communities Mobilize Around Land Ownership

    TRENDS Podcast: Mobile Home Communities Mobilize Around Land Ownership

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

     

    https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2019/10/TrendsPodcastEpisodeTwoMobileHomeLandOwnership.mp3

    Featured image: Doretta Knight Hultquist, a resident of Sans Souci.

     

    “I am 77 years old and this is my home and I would like to stay here, but I want to be safe and I want to be comfortable like everybody else.” — Doretta Knight Hultquist

     

    There are 4 manufactured home communities in the city of Boulder and about 25 overall in the county and they are home to thousands of families, single people, immigrants, working people and  seniors. People from all walks of life live in the mobile home communities and many have no other place to go.  77 year old Doretta Knight Hultquist, a resident of Sans Souci, a mobile home community in south Boulder, has been concerned about her future since a corporation bought the park over a year ago.

    “We’re trapped because we, like I say, we can’t move them anywhere cause no one else will accept them. And because mobile homes older than 76 are not allowed to be moved…we don’t know if they will allow us to sell them on site and with this new ownership, we don’t know if people will want to buy here because everything’s up in the air. We don’t know what’s what’s going on.”





    Listen to an extended conversation on issues facing mobile home residents in Boulder County with Crystal Launder, housing planner with the City of Boulder, Jesus Salazar, resident of Orchard Grove and an official Community Connector for the City of Boulder, Susan Lythgoe with Habitat for Humanity and Renée Hummel, resident of Vista Village and member of CMOB (Coalition of Manufactured-home Owners in Boulder.)

     



     

    Doretta’s situation highlights the paradox of being a mobile home owner. You own your home, but you don’t own the land that it sits on, and that creates uncertainty. Carmen Ramirez, the Community and Neighborhood Resources Manager for the City of Longmont, says mobile homes have become the last affordable home ownership option, but the fact that people don’t own their land creates vulnerability.

    “Historically this country has had that action of taking land and making it ownership of an individual and we own our individual homes. But if you look at back historically when we just how this country started, it started by taking the land of people that already lived on that land, which was our native American communities. They already lived there. And it, it they were not only were they killed, but they were taken from the land and forced onto other lens. And so I think that that has a lot to do with where we are in present, in the sense of we continue to do that.  Maybe not at a visible rate like when this country got started, but we continue to do that through gentrification [inaudible] through not allowing mobile home owners to really find ways to own the land themselves…so ownership of land then becomes the power of those that have resources. And in this case, it’s financial resources. It’s wealth. And that’s why corporations many times are the ones that own these mobile home parks. And again, it’s the basis of the land that gives the power.”

    Owning mobile home parks is big business.

    • 31 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Mobile Home Residents Face Water Quality and Infrastructure Issues

    TRENDS Podcast: Mobile Home Residents Face Water Quality and Infrastructure Issues

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

     

    https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2019/10/10-3-19_TrendsPodcastEpisode1MobileHomeInfrastructure.mp3

     

    “I feel like Boulder has a lot of protected areas, you know, and I feel like Boulder protects a lot of land, you know, I know a lot of open spaces, parks, so I feel like protecting someone’s home would be a great thing, you know?” — Adrian Duran.

     



    In Boulder, the median home price has more than doubled during the past 15 years, and is almost one million dollars.

    The rest of the county has seen sharp housing increases too. Longmont which has traditionally offered the cheapest housing in the county now sees the median price of a single family home at more than four hundred thousand dollars, nearly twice what it was 15 years ago.

    Things aren’t much better for renters. Census data shows that more than half of renters in Boulder County spend more than a third of their income on housing costs. And there is one group that is at the intersection of home ownership and home renting. Those that are living in mobile home communities.

    Mobile homes, or manufactured homes, are one of the last affordable housing options. There are 4 manufactured home communities in the city of Boulder and about 25 overall in the county and they are home to thousands of families. Analee Perez moved to the park when she was 2 years old. Her mother, Soledad, still lives there.

    “It’s really nice. It’s really calm. It’s a great, we have a yard to play in.”

    Orchard Grove is one of the four parks within Boulder City Limits. Analee had a happy childhood here. It is a strong community with neighbors helping neighbors and people looking out for each other. But residents have faced challenges.

    “If Boulder has standards for water and sewer infrastructure for you know, just compensation in the event of a water leak, none of that will apply to parks that are not within Boulder. So there they’re left to be more vulnerable.” — Shay Castle.

    “In the last few years, there’s been a lot of changes. Um, unpleasant changes. There’s been changes between, um, owners of the mobile home park and, um, landlords and a lot of instability. Um, the biggest problem that I can recall having in the last 29 years of living here is, when we had our water shut off, um, in February, so it was two weeks without water.”

    The Orchard Grove park is privately owned by a Michigan-based company called Riverstone Communities. So, when the 1960s-era infrastructure failed earlier this year and the residents were left without water for days, Analee reached out to city officials.

    “We were thinking, Oh, maybe, you know, a few hours. And then those few hours came 24 and then those 24 became longer and longer. And there’s plumbers working and digging up yards and it’s like we’re trying to locate the problem. And then, you know, then we went to, you know, w I guess the first hours is like, Hey, do you have water? No, I don’t have water. Do you? Oh, that’s weird. Oh, okay. And you know, once we knew we were having an issue with a water, um, I don’t know if anybody else did this, but I called the Boulder, the city of Boulder health department because we had been without water for more than 12 hours.”

    • 26 min
    TRENDS Podcast – An Equity Reporting Initiative

    TRENDS Podcast – An Equity Reporting Initiative

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most

    pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

    https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2019/09/APublicAffair_2019-09-23.mp3

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

WhimsicaLinds ,

Innovative, local reporting

The TRENDS podcast looks at Boulder country through an equity lens, sharing the experience of Boulder county residents. An example of what local reporting could - and should - look and sound like!

Top Podcasts In News