8 episodes

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. TRENDS dives deep into the community's most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

TRENDS: Boulder Community Foundation + KGNU KGNU

    • News
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. TRENDS dives deep into the community's most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.

    TRENDS Podcast: Cal-Wood Fire Anniversary: Investigation Results, Restoration Efforts & Preventative Measures

    TRENDS Podcast: Cal-Wood Fire Anniversary: Investigation Results, Restoration Efforts & Preventative Measures

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.





    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







    The Cal-Wood fire, from almost exactly one year ago, would eventually enter the history books as the largest ever recorded in Boulder County and the fifth costliest in Colorado.  Aided by strong down-sloping winds, with gusts up to 60 miles-per-hour, the fire, which started around noon on October 17th, would spread at a rate of 35 acres per minute during its first three hours, and would end up causing damage to more than 10 thousand acres of land.  Over 30% of the affected area sits on National Forest land.

    Listen to this TRENDS podcast call-in show:

    https://kgnu-news.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/10-21-21_RLB_TRENDS_-ACF_mixdown.mp3

    The TRENDS Podcast series is made possible with support from the KGNU Listener-Members and the Community Foundation for Boulder County.







    Aside from the damage caused to homes and other structures, the fire had terrible effects on the environment and the wildlife that inhabits the national forest land.  While many large animals had to be sheltered elsewhere during the fire, there are countless smaller species that are, and will probably forever be unaccounted for.  As a result, many educational and scientific projects were affected as well.



    Now, a year later almost to the day, we can reflect on the consequences of these fires.  While the cause of the Cal-Wood fire is undetermined, we can be sure that longer, hotter summers will only increase the probability of more fires.

    Watch the TRENDS call-in show:











    Story Sources:



    * Rafael Salgado, Executive Director Cal-Wood Educational Center

    * Teresa Chapman, Conservation Impact Scientist, Nature Conservancy

    * Stacey Forsyth, Director of CU Science Discovery

    * Regina Reyes -Zaragoza Thorne Nature Experience







     

    • 29 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Burnout Affects Teachers and Medical Providers The Most (Call-in Show)

    TRENDS Podcast: Burnout Affects Teachers and Medical Providers The Most (Call-in Show)

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.





    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







    Burnout classified by the World Health Organization as a medical diagnosis described as “a syndrome as a result of a chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed” by the International Classification of Diseases, the handbook that guides medical providers in diagnosing conditions.

    Listen to this TRENDS podcast call-in show:

    https://kgnu-news.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/TRENDS_Burnout_Call-IN-Show_KGNU.mp3

    The TRENDS Podcast series is made possible with support from the KGNU Listener-Members and the Community Foundation for Boulder County.







    Our guests today are Rona Wilensky and Janine D' Anniballe.



    Rona Wilensky, known in the community for her work with mindfulness programs for educators at the Passage Works Institute where she taught SMART in Education, a mindfulness  program for educators. Rona Wilensky  is the founding principal of New Vista High School. Janine D’Anniballe, a licensed psychologist and a nationally  recognized expert in sexual assault and traumatic stress, and treatment  for survivors.



    Janine currently serves as the  Director of Trauma Services at Mental Health Partners in Lafayette,  Colorado. She also has been the Director of Moving to End Sexual Assault (MESA),



    Teachers and Nurses are the most vulnerable to get burnout, what seems an occupational phenomenon.



    The complex topic of burnout - affecting mostly people that hold curtain occupations that tent to be diagnosed with what now is defined as a syndrome as a result of a chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.

    Watch the TRENDS call-in show:













    Story Sources:



    * Rona Wilensky, mindful educator, former New Vista Principal and former Passage Works Institute director

    * Janine D'Anniballe, licensed psychologist, Director of Trauma Services at Mental Health Partners







    *

    • 33 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Youth Mental Health Crisis And The Need For A Sense Of Belonging

    TRENDS Podcast: Youth Mental Health Crisis And The Need For A Sense Of Belonging

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.





    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







    In this episode, we will be diving into the issue of youth mental health, especially after a sharp rise in young patients seeking help prompted several pediatric healthcare professionals in Colorado to declare a youth mental health state of emergency. KGNU spoke with some of these healthcare providers, as well as concerned community members who also work to ensure the well-being of our youth.



    According to data from the United Health Foundation, in 2020 there were 19.8 teen deaths by suicide for every 100,000 teens between the ages of 15 and 19 in Colorado. This is significantly higher than the national suicide rate of 8.4 teens per 100k.



    For Colorado, the teen suicide rate had been rising every year by over 11 percentage points in the four year of the pandemic. The pandemic has only made matters worse. In 2014, suicide accounted for 41% of teen deaths in Boulder County. While alarming, the rate has only gotten worse since then.



    In this podcast episode, we will hear from mental health professionals, healers, counselors, and community activists about the current mental health crisis affecting our youth in Boulder County. Their teachings voice a common thread about the importance for our children to develop a sense of belonging within a community that will accept them as they are, where they will feel safe in feeling and expressing their emotions, where they can feel empowered and supported in the pursuit of their passions and dreams.

    Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:

    https://kgnu-news.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/7-15-21_RL-Trends-Podcast-Youth-Mental-Health_KGNU_mixdown.mp3

    The TRENDS Podcast series is made possible with support from the KGNU Listener-Members and the Community Foundation for Boulder County.





    In this TRENDS panel, we speak with Raul Galindo, a local therapist who teaches parenting classes for the Latinx communities in Longmont - Nurturing Parenting Classes. We also speak with Tammy Lawrence and Katie Romero, former high school counselors who are currently Directors of Student Support Services for BVSD. We'll hear what the schools are doing to provide more support for our young students as well as about resources and solutions to address our children's mental health.



    Listen to the TRENDS panel for this episode below:

    https://kgnu-news.sfo2.digitaloceanspaces.

    • 29 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Confronting the Lack of Diversity in Newsrooms

    TRENDS Podcast: Confronting the Lack of Diversity in Newsrooms

    From the left: Lori Lizarraga, Betty Aragon-Mitotes, Diamond Hardiman, Tina Griego

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



    Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:

    https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2021/06/6-7-21_TRENDSPodcast_LackofDiversityinNewsrooms_Updated.mp3







    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







    A lack of diversity among journalists, reporters and media producers in newsrooms influences the stories suggested by readers and listeners and the coverage they receive. Their lack of representation is true not only in Colorado, but across the United States.



    This monthly series explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County, through the experiences of community members, especially those on the margins. We aim to shed light on community challenges, solutions and pathways forward for the county and the country.



    According to an article by Gabriel Arana of Columbia Journalism Review, in 1976 the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) made a pledge that by the year 2000, the percentage of racial and ethnic minorities in newsrooms would match the population, stressing the importance of lifting people of color into management positions. Today, minority newsroom staff are less than half of the population they represent, and minorities in newsroom leadership positions less than a third.



    Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes is the founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices



    Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices, talks about the importance of media producers of color to bring forward the stories from the community.



    “I want to hear, I want to see people in media in positions of power that look like me because when you see somebody that looks like you they are paving the way for the rest of us, and we need to show people we are capable, we are knowledgeable, and we are educated and we can do this,” says Aragon.



    Betty Aragon emphasizes that she wants people who are living an experience to tell their own story. “I don't want to tell a story. I want them to tell the story and I'm sorry, but I have to tell you, I don't want white people telling our story. You know, this is about our reality. And when you have people that are on the outside looking in, many times, and you know, I'm really grateful to the white community because they have helped us a lot with funding, but here's the reality of that. They're not seeing our lives through our lens. They're seeing it through their reality.

    • 30 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Gun Violence – An Epidemic on Our Youth’s Shoulders

    TRENDS Podcast: Gun Violence – An Epidemic on Our Youth’s Shoulders

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



    Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:

    https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2021/04/4-21-21_Trends-Podcast_GunControl_KGNU.mp3







    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







    Gun Violence, which President Biden has called an epidemic in America, continues to affect the youth of color across the country.



    According to CDC data for 2019, in Colorado young Black males aged 15 to 34 are 12.6 times more likely to die by firearm homicide than their White counterparts. Colorado also ranks among the ten states with the highest suicide rate in the country.



    The public gathers to remember those lost in the Boulder King Soopers shooting



    According to the CDC’s WISQARS web-based injury statistics query and reporting system, homicide with a firearm was the leading cause of death for youth age 10 to 24 in the US in 2019. Almost 7,500 youth aged 10 to 24 died from intentional firearm injuries, including 4,483 homicides and 2,972 suicides. Since the early 1990s, males of color have suffered a disproportionate number of firearm homicides. From 2015 to 2019, males died from firearm homicide at a rate of 12 per 100,000, which was nine times higher than females. Black youth died from firearm homicide at a rate of 28 per 100,000, which was 10 times higher than White youth. Additionally, in 2019 4% of high school students in the US, including 7% of males and 2% of females, reported carrying a gun in the last year, for reasons other than hunting or sport, and 4% of 12 to 18 year olds recorded having access to a loaded gun without adult permission.



    These shocking statistics are provided by Sabrina Arredondo Mattson, PhD, a Senior research associate at the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, a part of the Institute of Behavioral Science at CU Boulder, where she has been conducting research about gun violence in youth since 1995.



    According to Arredondo Mattson, there are particular challenges in addressing youth gun violence in communities of color because of structural issues that create inequalities among different groups.



    “The problems of youth violence and firearm violence are magnified in hybrid communities and communities of color. There are ideologies, institutions, and policies that foster structural violence and create unequal power that perpetuate social, political, and economic conditions that harm some groups and privilege others. For example, concentrated poverty, structural racism, limited services, and over-policing of low-income black neighborhoods are challenges that make it difficult for communities to provide the protective factors that are needed to promote healthy youth development and reduce risk factors that undermine healthy youth development,” said Arredondo Mattson.

    • 27 min
    TRENDS Podcast: Coronavirus Vaccines – Voices From the Community

    TRENDS Podcast: Coronavirus Vaccines – Voices From the Community

    The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



    featured image: Fred Glover in line for a coronavirus vaccine.



    Listen to the Coronavirus Vaccine: Community Voices TRENDS podcast episode











    Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.









    It has been almost one year since the first lockdown order went into effect in Boulder County to curb the spread of the coronavirus.  People are experiencing COVID-19 fatigue and are anxious to know when things might start to return to some normalcy.



    People being monitored in a waiting room after receiving their coronavirus vaccines in Boulder County



    Experts and government officials tell us that, although the future remains uncertain, the timeline depends greatly on following precautionary guidelines, like mask use and social distancing, and on a large portion of the population getting the vaccine.



    CDC experts are still trying to determine the percentage of the population that needs to either get the vaccine or have had the disease to achieve herd immunity.  Most estimates are around 70 to 75 percent.



    Michael, a nurse at a Boulder County vaccine clinic, administers a coronavirus vaccine to Fred Glover



    This is a very high number, not only because of the challenges in rolling out the vaccine program but also because not everyone is willing or able to get the vaccine.  The reasons for this are many, including fear, mistrust, medical issues, and those who choose not to get vaccinated.



    Fred Glover, a distinguished professor who retired from CU Boulder, got his first vaccine on an icy early morning in February.



    Glover says that it is unfortunate that some people are afraid of a vaccine.



    "If you don't get the vaccine versus the likelihood of having a reaction, if you do, there's just no comparison. It's all your chances of coming up ahead are just dramatically better, if you get the vaccine," he said.

    Glover lost a brother to polio when he was  14 years old, a year before the polio vaccine became available. "And my gosh, if we had only had that vaccine, my brother's death could have been avoided. And all of the people whose lives were saved by that vaccine is a testimony to the importance of getting a vaccine for a serious illness when it's available."



    Raquel Cagan, a neuropsychologist who lives in Boulder, was born in Colombia and worked primarily with young children, specifically in underserved and impoverished communities.



    She remembers a time when children were encouraged to donate 10 cents to help eradicate polio in other parts of the world.



    "I remember as a child well, and we moved to this country, you had to go and give 10 cents to the March of Dimes… my mom didn't have a lot of money, but I had my 10 cents and you went and you put it in a little caniste...

    • 15 min

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Innovative, local reporting

The TRENDS podcast looks at Boulder country through an equity lens, sharing the experience of Boulder county residents. An example of what local reporting could - and should - look and sound like!

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