30 min

TRENDS Podcast: Confronting the Lack of Diversity in Newsrooms TRENDS: Boulder Community Foundation + KGNU

    • News

From the left: Lori Lizarraga, Betty Aragon-Mitotes, Diamond Hardiman, Tina Griego

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:

https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2021/06/6-7-21_TRENDSPodcast_LackofDiversityinNewsrooms_Updated.mp3







Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







A lack of diversity among journalists, reporters and media producers in newsrooms influences the stories suggested by readers and listeners and the coverage they receive. Their lack of representation is true not only in Colorado, but across the United States.



This monthly series explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County, through the experiences of community members, especially those on the margins. We aim to shed light on community challenges, solutions and pathways forward for the county and the country.



According to an article by Gabriel Arana of Columbia Journalism Review, in 1976 the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) made a pledge that by the year 2000, the percentage of racial and ethnic minorities in newsrooms would match the population, stressing the importance of lifting people of color into management positions. Today, minority newsroom staff are less than half of the population they represent, and minorities in newsroom leadership positions less than a third.



Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes is the founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices



Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices, talks about the importance of media producers of color to bring forward the stories from the community.



“I want to hear, I want to see people in media in positions of power that look like me because when you see somebody that looks like you they are paving the way for the rest of us, and we need to show people we are capable, we are knowledgeable, and we are educated and we can do this,” says Aragon.



Betty Aragon emphasizes that she wants people who are living an experience to tell their own story. “I don't want to tell a story. I want them to tell the story and I'm sorry, but I have to tell you, I don't want white people telling our story. You know, this is about our reality. And when you have people that are on the outside looking in, many times, and you know, I'm really grateful to the white community because they have helped us a lot with funding, but here's the reality of that. They're not seeing our lives through our lens. They're seeing it through their reality.

From the left: Lori Lizarraga, Betty Aragon-Mitotes, Diamond Hardiman, Tina Griego

The TRENDS podcast is a collaboration between the Community Foundation of Boulder County and KGNU. It dives deep into the community’s most pressing issues and explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County through the experiences of community members, especially those often rendered invisible by commercial media, to shed light on community challenges, solutions, and pathways forward for the county and the country.



Listen to this TRENDS podcast episode below:

https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/kgnu-news/2021/06/6-7-21_TRENDSPodcast_LackofDiversityinNewsrooms_Updated.mp3







Subscribe to TRENDS on iTunes to get new editions automatically. Also on Spotify and Stitcher.







A lack of diversity among journalists, reporters and media producers in newsrooms influences the stories suggested by readers and listeners and the coverage they receive. Their lack of representation is true not only in Colorado, but across the United States.



This monthly series explores the changes happening throughout Boulder County, through the experiences of community members, especially those on the margins. We aim to shed light on community challenges, solutions and pathways forward for the county and the country.



According to an article by Gabriel Arana of Columbia Journalism Review, in 1976 the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) made a pledge that by the year 2000, the percentage of racial and ethnic minorities in newsrooms would match the population, stressing the importance of lifting people of color into management positions. Today, minority newsroom staff are less than half of the population they represent, and minorities in newsroom leadership positions less than a third.



Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes is the founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices



Hispanic activist Betty Aragon-Mitotes founder of Mujeres de Colores and director of the documentary Hispanic Communities Voices, talks about the importance of media producers of color to bring forward the stories from the community.



“I want to hear, I want to see people in media in positions of power that look like me because when you see somebody that looks like you they are paving the way for the rest of us, and we need to show people we are capable, we are knowledgeable, and we are educated and we can do this,” says Aragon.



Betty Aragon emphasizes that she wants people who are living an experience to tell their own story. “I don't want to tell a story. I want them to tell the story and I'm sorry, but I have to tell you, I don't want white people telling our story. You know, this is about our reality. And when you have people that are on the outside looking in, many times, and you know, I'm really grateful to the white community because they have helped us a lot with funding, but here's the reality of that. They're not seeing our lives through our lens. They're seeing it through their reality.

30 min