10 episodes

Thomas E. Woods, Jr. presents this seminar covering the material in his books, and details and defends the Jeffersonian-Rothbardian perspective. Here is the cutting edge of libertarian history that completely rethinks the meaning and impact of the welfare-warfare state.Download the complete audio of this event (ZIP) here.

The Truth About American History: An Austro-Jeffersonian Perspective Mises Institute

    • Podcasts
    • 3.9 • 93 Ratings

Thomas E. Woods, Jr. presents this seminar covering the material in his books, and details and defends the Jeffersonian-Rothbardian perspective. Here is the cutting edge of libertarian history that completely rethinks the meaning and impact of the welfare-warfare state.Download the complete audio of this event (ZIP) here.

    1. Thomas Jefferson and the Principles of '98

    1. Thomas Jefferson and the Principles of '98

    The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 had criminalized excessive criticism of government.  Jefferson feared it would be used in a partisan way. The Acts violated the Tenth Amendment by encroaching on a state prerogative. 

    2. States' Rights in Theory and Practice

    2. States' Rights in Theory and Practice

    The compact theory holds that self-governing sovereign states have rights to protect themselves, whereas the nationalist theory holds that nullification or secession would be insubordination. Nationalists view states as a single whole with no boundaries and a single aggregated people. 

    3. The States' Rights Tradition Nobody Knows

    3. The States' Rights Tradition Nobody Knows

    New England was not in favor of the War of 1812 and it considered seceding, but the death of Hamilton in his duel with Burr destroyed that plan. The idea of secession was more embraced by the Northern than by the Southern states.

    4. The Fourteenth Amendment

    4. The Fourteenth Amendment

    This is a difficult issue. Most of the controversy is from Section One. What exactly does the first sentence mean? If the Fourteenth Amendment was in fact intended to bind the states to the Bill of Rights that the federal government could enforce, then it dramatically increases the police power of the federal government.

    5. The Great Depression, World War II, and American Prosperity, Part I

    5. The Great Depression, World War II, and American Prosperity, Part I

    The 1920s had difficulties, but the depth of the Great Depression was in 1931. Any theory of boom-bust events must ask why so many entrepreneurs made terrible errors in a cluster. Why do busts hit capital goods industries harder than they do consumer goods industries?

    6. The Great Depression, World War II, and American Prosperity, Part II

    6. The Great Depression, World War II, and American Prosperity, Part II

    FDR’s stated New Deal purpose was to keep work weeks short and to extend minimum wages which were extremely high. But, production is what makes demand possible and what increases purchasing power, not federal mandates.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
93 Ratings

93 Ratings

Dana94591 ,

US history

Good!

Greater Works ,

Absolutely Excellent

Tom Woods is an excellent teacher and fountain of knowledge. Mises Institute is a great organization. Excellent Podcast here.

22220 ,

The Best Prof. On American History!

Loved these Lectures giving the TRUE history. Very enlightening.

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