27 episodes

Each episode we interview a badass social change leader and learn the ins and outs of what they're doing to make the world a better place. This podcast will help you feel optimistic that we can make a difference and give you practical tips about how to go about doing so in a big way.

Unleashing Social Change Becky Margiotta

    • Relationships
    • 4.8, 13 Ratings

Each episode we interview a badass social change leader and learn the ins and outs of what they're doing to make the world a better place. This podcast will help you feel optimistic that we can make a difference and give you practical tips about how to go about doing so in a big way.

    Episode 25: Christine Margiotta, SVP Los Angeles, “Shifting from Charity to Justice.” 

    Episode 25: Christine Margiotta, SVP Los Angeles, “Shifting from Charity to Justice.” 

    In this episode, Becky interviews her favorite person, her amazing wife Christine! They’ll discuss everything from how they met 10 years ago (working on homelessness) to learning more about Christine’s current work funding grassroots social justice efforts in Los Angeles. You’ll hear how Christine’s journey has led her to serve as the Executive Director of Social Venture Partners Los Angeles, where she is working on shifting philanthropy from a charity mindset to one deeply rooted in justice. 
    Over the years, Christine has been working deep on systems change while Becky has been working broad on spread and scale. This combination makes for an interesting conversation to eavesdrop! Listen to them discuss some of the key moments that have shaped Christine into the leader she is today and how she envisions all of us creating a more just and loving world. 
    Show Highlights:
    How Christine and Becky met working on homelessness Collective impact and how to bring philanthropy, business, non-profits, government and voters to tackle big problems together The importance of doing iterative and deep root cause analysis  How to create a liberatory non-profit culture with your employees The moral dilemma of accepting funding from companies that are perpetuating harm How SVP Los Angeles is working to disrupt the field of philanthropy  
    Links: svpla.org

    • 55 min
    Episode 24: Dimitry Anselme, Facing History, “Teaching Kids in the Midst of the Fragility of our Democracy”

    Episode 24: Dimitry Anselme, Facing History, “Teaching Kids in the Midst of the Fragility of our Democracy”

    How do we help balance the desire for our kids to know the truth and yet also wanting to shield them from the pain and horrors embedded in history? Dimitry Anselme from Facing History opens this episode’s conversation with an interesting provocation that youth enter the conversation about history through moral and ethical terms. It is how we engage them in learning and help them locate themselves within the stories.  When we start with, “Your ideas matter, your culture matters, whatever you are bringing into the classroom matters, and instead of trying to erase or assimilate it, we will build upon it,” then we have them engaged.
    Dimitry’s own history of growing up in Kinshasa, where the teaching style was to see the teacher as a beacon of all knowledge and it was disrespectful to ask a question, to building a community of students around him now asking the tough questions is a beautiful journey we explore in today’s episode. Our democracy is fragile and if we wish to protect it, we need to continue to nurture the critical thinking of our students.    
    Show Highlights:
    What is Facing History and Ourselves and their mission Dimitry’s personal story for how he came to this work from teaching and could not find resources as a young Black teacher on how to help his students think critically and their place in history Expanding from Holocaust to emergence of racist thinking, the eugenics movement and race membership, Civil Rights movement and the Reconstruction Era Social Emotional Learning – more kids are now able to identify racism, homophobia, and are attuned to it happening Pedogogy of the Oppressed – valuing what you think. Your questions are valid is incredibly affirming. Practices we can adopt to become better teachers and the mindset shift to create lifelong learners which can be tough when emphasis is on numbers and grades and passing a test How do we bring equity in more fragile communities? Do the students feel like they are rightful contributors of society? Resources varying from one school to another - Brown vs. Brown was not about segregation and integration, it was about equal access to resources, textbooks, etc. The idea is it is always a march towards progress – teaching history is really teaching how we’ve taken five steps forward, 2 steps back Re-dedicating yourself to the mission of building the society you hope to have Navigating organizational change over time. What is the rationale for changing something that is going well?  Why do we want to work at a particular scale? Diffusion of Innovation Curve. Slowing down and letting early adopters teach you and get it right so that it is easier to get to the late adopters because concerns and tests have been addressed prior.  The scaling plan of Facing History developed during two Skid Row Schools to now 100,000 educators Willingness and tolerance for failure and changing the culture for this Building tolerance for “I don’t know if this is going to work” You can build up a system where you will know fast if it is not working In leadership, imagining who will be and where we will be in 20-30 years requires steady discipline Links:
    Facinghistory.org
    Diffusion of Innovation Curve

    • 53 min
    Episode 23: Jason Marsh, Greater Good Science Center, “Advancing Well-Being and Happiness through Research”

    Episode 23: Jason Marsh, Greater Good Science Center, “Advancing Well-Being and Happiness through Research”

    Episode 23: Jason Marsh, Greater Good Science Center, “Advancing Well-Being and Happiness through Research”
    How do we advance and spread something that is so essential yet seemingly difficult to grasp as “happiness” and “well-being”? Jason Marsh joins us today for an engaging discussion about how The Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley is doing just that with their open source method of sharing their research. What they have found is building happiness and well-being is about the cultivation of relationships, how we expand our concept of the “in” group, how we make the distinction between empathy and compassion, and how we can improve the conditions to make each and every contact with the people we interact with more positive.
    In this episode, Jason discusses how outcomes can change when we know what is expected of us, like when children play “The Wall Street Game” vs. “The Cooperation Game.” And how the Bridging Differences study breaks down the barriers between those we see as different. Human beings have an innate draw towards kindness and compassion yet also the pervasiveness to dehumanize people we disagree with. How do we stimulate the positive natural impulses so we can bridge that gap between what we hope to see in the world vs. what we do see in the world? Listen in on this fascinating discussion so we can build a happier and healthier world.
    Show highlights:
    Shrinking the change, clearing the path and making research accessible Making research more applicable to people’s everyday lives Combatting the pervasiveness we have to dehumanize people we disagree with How we expand the “in” group so we can be more generous and kind Knowing what is expected of us and how that impacts behavior Conditions that make contact more positive: 1) Equal Status 2) taking cues from leaders 3) common goals and seeing my fate as linked with other’s fate Evidence that health outcomes and other outcomes are poorer when there is a larger disparity between people Defining suffering and the difference between empathy and compassion Studies on kindness and compassion out of Harvard – seeing an 18-month old observe an adult drop something and need help What is result of entire lifetime of cues that child sees, even subtle ones and cultivating mindfulness Pro-social vs. anti-social behavior and the impact of having just one positive relationship with an adult at school The Greater Good Science Center method of open source as an end game for spread (Gugalev and Stern) and thinking though sustainability with open source model Pyramid of Engagement for sustainability – professional products and experiences for those who want to go deeper and funneling (the both/and model) Is human nature good or bad? The deeply rooted instincts we have both for care and to do bad things as well. But how do our environments elicit one or the other?  We become more self-interested when we feel scarcity and feel threatened or scared We often think that the world has become more violent but the historical look shows that violence is actually significantly lower than centuries ago  
     
    Links:
    https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/
    https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/
    https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/bridging_differences/definition
    https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/podcasts/item/episode_57_why_shared_goals_can_bridge_divides
    Steven Pinker – “The Blank Slate”

    • 47 min
    Episode 22: Kate Hilton, Institute for Health Care Improvement, “Getting Out of Your Own Way as a Leader”

    Episode 22: Kate Hilton, Institute for Health Care Improvement, “Getting Out of Your Own Way as a Leader”

    What could we all accomplish if we could put relationships first and primacy in shared purpose? In this episode, Kate Hilton shares how her view of leadership has shifted over the years starting with her own experience of being told to get out of her own way.  From discussing the shift from “power over” to “power with” and discovering that the joy in work comes from what matters to people.  When you start with who people are vs. what you want to do and listen to what people’s biggest dreams and assets are, your strategy only gets better.
    Kate has an insatiable curiosity around how to help people make change on the basis of activating their agency, power and courage.  She also dances her face off with zero inhibition. As a lover of people, Kate is a studier of the human conditions for social change and we have a lot to learn from her so you won’t want to miss this fun and engaging conversation!    
    Show highlights:
    Kate’s circuitous career path that led her to where she is today Her love of people and of finding out their values and what drives them The experience of having Marshall Ganz as mentor Evolving as a leader and the hardest thing to let go of The value of breathing and getting perspective Mental failure exercise Psychology of Change and what are the things that get in the way of effective leadership Understanding power as a relationship MLK, Jr. definition of power as, “The ability to achieve purpose.” Combining resources together to create new power out of shared values Power as malleable because you have to build the relationships How to help one another through fears and motivations How you keep what matters front and center Are there enough people moving in the right direction vs. being at the effect of… Psychology of Change Framework: 1.  Unleashing people’s intrinsic motivation 2. co-designing with people most impacted by the change 3. co-producing in authentic relationships 4. distributing power and 5. adapting in action. Recognizing and mapping the system by people Shifting from what matters to me to what matters to other people Appreciative inquiry and motivational interviewing Power as being fundamentally about people Activating people’s agency is at the heart of the psychology of change and the ability to act In democratic societies, knowledge of how we combine to create is the basis of our commitment If not now, when? We can’t learn what we need to learn without getting into action Links:
    ihi.org/psychofchange
    Psychology of Change Framework
    http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/IHIWhitePapers/IHI-Psychology-of-Change-Framework.aspx
     
    https://healthequity.atlanticfellows.org/
     
    https://hbr.org/2019/05/how-one-health-system-overcame-resistance-to-a-surgical-checklist
     
    The Uninhabitable Earth book
    https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/586541/the-uninhabitable-earth-by-david-wallace-wells/
    Donella Meadows, “Thinking in Systems”
    http://donellameadows.org/systems-thinking-resources/

    • 43 min
    Episode 21: Helen Smith, Forensic Psychiatrist (NHS) – “Creative Solutions that Arise When You Take the Fear Out of the System”

    Episode 21: Helen Smith, Forensic Psychiatrist (NHS) – “Creative Solutions that Arise When You Take the Fear Out of the System”

    As co-founder of the Billions Institute, Joe McCannon says, when you invoke the John Cusack rule of taking the fear off the set, that’s when amazing things happen. In this episode, Helen Smith, a forensic psychiatrist, tells stories of some of the creative solutions that have arisen in her sector through freeing the front lines to improve the system and the joy that comes from experiencing these changes and sharing them with others. She also unpacks some of the language of “looking after” and walking alongside people vs. “treating” patients.
    We’ll also discuss how returning to curiosity is the key in openness to discovery and how to nurture the liberating structures that can change the relationship between staff and patients to bring healing. When hierarchies are flattened and the environment of humility and humanity are elevated, there can be beautifully simple solutions that aren’t learned in textbooks. Listen in on this beautiful discussion out of which uncovering purpose and joy can produce remarkable results. 
    Show Highlights:
    Background into what forensic psychiatry is and those Helen and her team serve Accessing compassion and humanity when working with those who are deeply distressed The importance of identifying each individual’s genius and redefining success The mental model of walking alongside someone and helping them manage their own mental health vs. doing it for them which does not help them when released Helen’s experience of being released to her own genius and what brings her deep joy The SCARF Model and how they activate personas Helping others improve the things they want to improve and see how much joy they get from experiencing it and sharing with each other Weaning people off of you and give them one another is how to create large scale change Advice for leaders to not sit at the back on computers, but be in the mix and flatten the hierarchy and participate as your authentic self Allowing mistakes as learning experiences and the importance of having fun with one another and test out new structures Modeling and communicating to others as a leader that mistakes are learning experiences and expected The specific goal of their practice of reducing restrictive interventions – restraints, seclusions and reducing rapid tranquilization Remarkable results they are getting through the Breakthrough Collaborative model Changing the relationship between staff and patients Two successful interventions that arose from deeply understanding what irritates patients LINKS:
    SCARF MODEL
    https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/SCARF.htm
     
    Liberating Structures App:
    https://www.liberatingstructures.app/en/

    • 46 min
    Episode 20: Gerry Balcazar and Hugo Ramirez, Vision y Compromiso, “The Movement is Built from the Community of Friends and Neighbors”

    Episode 20: Gerry Balcazar and Hugo Ramirez, Vision y Compromiso, “The Movement is Built from the Community of Friends and Neighbors”

    In California, only about 30% of children are being taken care of by formal licensed daycare centers while their parents go to work. This means as many as 70% are being taken care of by informal options such as family, friends and neighbors. These FFNs as they are called are going above and beyond to be the “village” for the love of children and desire to build up this next generation. However, they often lack the support and respect that helps them to leverage the important role they have in society. How is Vision y Compromiso validating their critical place in our communities and increasing the training for this large group of caregivers to grow in their role?
    In this episode, we talk with Gerry and Hugo and their vision for the leaders in their communities, the Promotores, who have the ability to gather people and to increase the trust in these uncertain times, so that these tremendously important community members can thrive. Often these caretakers are raising kids during long and unpredictable hours and providing so much more than physical care, they are the emotional supports and cultural influencers. This is organization at the grassroots level and you’ll want to listen in!
    What are Promotores and what do they do Engaging family, friends and neighbors, especially when they may be wary of government  The importance of self-care and self-validation when not always appreciated or recognized in the wider society Why network of informal caregivers are so pivotal in our society Involvement of the families and feedback they give and how they need to be supported Importance of valuing the culture and feeding into cultural traditions Training on multiple intelligences so that caregivers feel validated in all the ways they are building into the children Training providing empowerment and authority to speak about their education related to child development Overlay with the immigrant community and the fear of providing information in current times of changing immigration laws The role of Promotores in building trust Rural vs. Urban areas and the difference in working with the different communities Learning from the insight gathered from within Links:
    Visionycompromiso.org

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

Erin-100kAlum ,

Becky & Jake

Do yourself a favor and listen to this excellent discussion about building, learning, and refining a movement for large scale change! Two brilliant thinkers and leaders. Yes, I’m biased: being a part of both the 100k and BFZ teams remains the greatest slice of luck and learning in my professional career. Love you guys :-)

ninaksimon ,

Inspiring, distinctive, worth your time if you want to make change

Ok, I admit. A review from a guest is probably a _bit_ biased. But I’ve listened to all the episodes so far, and I’ve learned a lot. Becky keeps it human and real, but she also dives into the details of large-scale social change in ways you can’t hear anywhere else. She’s a great out-loud learner and I feel lucky to learn alongside her as a listener.

DWSLV ,

Becky, an inspiration

Becky is an inspiring leader, an inspiring leader. I’m so grateful that I can hear her voice again, speaking to our higher selves in these challenging times.

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