533 episodes

Vox Conversations brings you discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light. Join Sean Illing and his colleagues across the Vox newsroom for new episodes every Monday and Thursday.

Vox Conversations Vox

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.5 • 9.6K Ratings

Vox Conversations brings you discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light. Join Sean Illing and his colleagues across the Vox newsroom for new episodes every Monday and Thursday.

    Even Better: Workplace equality 2.0

    Even Better: Workplace equality 2.0

    Every Thursday in August, you'll hear Even Better on Vox Conversations, a special series focused on helping people live better lives individually and collectively.
    In the second episode, host Julia Furlan talks with author and CEO Minda Harts about how to fight for equality in the workplace. Harts’s work has focused on empowering people, particularly women of color, to find their voice and secure a seat at the table. Julia and Minda discuss the failures of "Lean In" to meaningfully address these issues, how to overcome common workplace obstacles and stereotypes, and how to achieve success through enrolling your coworkers and colleagues in the project of creating a truly equitable and respectful workplace.
    Host: Julia Furlan (@juliastmi)
    Guest: Minda Harts (@MindaHarts), author; founder and CEO of The Memo
    References: 


    You Are More Than Magic: The Black and Brown Girls' Guide to Finding Your Voice by Minda Harts 


    The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table by Minda Harts


    Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

     

    Even Better is here to offer deeply sourced, actionable advice for helping you live a better life. Follow Even Better at vox.com/even-better.
    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 
    Producer: Erikk Geannikis
    Editor: Amy Drozdowska
    Engineer: Patrick Boyd
    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall
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    • 53 min
    Why we're still postmodern (whatever that means)

    Why we're still postmodern (whatever that means)

    Sean Illing talks with Stuart Jeffries, journalist and author of Everything, All the Time, Everywhere, about why postmodernism is so hard to define, and why — as Jeffries argues — it's still a very active presence in our culture and politics today. They discuss whether our desire should be understood as subversive or as a tool of capitalism, how postmodernism is inextricably linked with neoliberalism, and how to navigate our current culture of ubiquitous consumption and entertainment. What should we watch on TV: Boris Johnson's resignation speech, or the reality show Love Is Blind?
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Stuart Jeffries, author; feature writer, The Guardian
    References: 


    Everything, All the Time, Everywhere: How We Became Postmodern by Stuart Jeffries (Verso; 2021)


    "The post-truth prophets" by Sean Illing (Vox; Nov. 16, 2019)


    The Postmodern Condition by Jean-François Lyotard (Univ. of Minnesota Press; 1979, tr. 1984)


    Simulacra and Simulation by Jean Baudrillard (Univ. of Michigan Press; 1981, tr. 1983)


    Postmodernism: Style and Subversion, 1970–1990 (exhibition catalog, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK; Sept. 24, 2011 – Jan. 15, 2012)


    "Postmodernism: from the cutting edge to the museum" by Hari Kunzru (The Guardian; Sept. 15, 2011)


    "You're sayin' a foot massage don't mean nothin', and I'm sayin' it does" by James Wood (Guardian Supplement; Nov. 19, 1994)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 58 min
    Even Better: Activism when you don't know where to start

    Even Better: Activism when you don't know where to start

    Every Thursday in August, you'll hear Even Better on Vox Conversations, a special series focused on helping people live better lives individually and collectively.
    In this first episode, host Julia Furlan talks with activist, writer, and organizer Brea Baker. Brea's career has included student activism at Yale University, national organizing for the Women's March, and continues today through action-oriented work on behalf of progressive causes. Brea talks about how her work is informed by radical love, how she confronts obstacles in the movement on both personal and organizational scales, and how we can push back against despair and dread, and come into our power — no matter where we're at.
    Host: Julia Furlan (@juliastmi)
    Guests: Brea Baker (@Brea_Baker), activist; writer; Chief Equity Officer, Inspire Justice
    References: 


    "bell hooks Taught Us To Both Practice and Preach Radical Love" by Brea Baker (Elle; Dec. 20, 2021)


    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press; 2010)


    "Yale Announces a New Center for Race Studies. A Yale Senior Asks, Now What?" by Brea Baker (Elle; Feb. 23, 2016)


    "Why I Became an Abolitionist" by Brea Baker (Harper's Bazaar; Dec. 10, 2020)


    We Do This 'Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice by Mariame Kaba (Haymarket; 2021)


    Even Better is here to offer deeply sourced, actionable advice for helping you live a better life. Follow Even Better at vox.com/even-better.
    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 48 min
    The Supreme Court's power grab

    The Supreme Court's power grab

    Sean Illing talks with Harvard Law professor Nikolas Bowie about the U.S. Supreme Court's recently-concluded term, which produced landmark opinions restricting the power of the EPA, expanding gun rights, and overturning Roe v. Wade. They discuss how the conservative court's arguments are structured and why they are in fact quite radical, what "legal liberalism" is and whether it has just been decisively repudiated, and whether there are any reforms that could stop the conservative majority from reshaping American jurisprudence.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Nikolas Bowie (@nikobowie), Louis D. Brandeis Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
    References: 


    Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court, Public Meeting, Panel 1 (C-SPAN; June 30)


    "How the Supreme Court dominates our democracy" by Niko Bowie (Washington Post; July 16, 2021)

    A Twitter thread on the repudiation of legal liberalism, by @nikobowie



    Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health (SCOTUS; June 24)


    42 U.S. Code §1983 - Civil action for deprivation of rights


    14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1868)


    New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen (SCOTUS; June 23)


    Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey (SCOTUS; June 29, 1992)


    Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don't Talk about It) by Elizabeth Anderson (Princeton; 2017)


    "A new Supreme Court case is the biggest threat to US democracy since January 6" by Ian Millhiser (Vox; June 30)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 1 hr 5 min
    How middlemen took over the economy

    How middlemen took over the economy

    Vox's Emily Stewart talks with Kathryn Judge, professor at Columbia Law School and author of the new book Direct: The Rise of Middleman Economy and the Power of Going to the Source. They discuss how middlemen — which include real estate agents, stock brokers, but also Amazon and Walmart — came to assume such an outsized role in our economy, the pros and cons of middlemen in different market contexts, why Prof. Judge sees a fundamental difference between Etsy and Amazon, and how we consumers can change how we decide what to buy in order to help push the economy in a radically different direction.
    Host: Emily Stewart (@EmilyStewartM), senior correspondent, Vox
    Guests: Kathryn Judge (@ProfKateJudge), Harvey J. Goldschmid Professor of Law, Columbia University; author
    References: 


    Direct: The Rise of the Middleman Economy and the Power of Going to the Source by Kathryn Judge (Harper Business; 2022)


    "So Much for Cutting Out the Middleman" by Kathryn Judge (The Atlantic; June 9)


    "What Is Web3?" by Thomas Stackpole (Harvard Business Review; May 10)


    "The awful American consumer" by Emily Stewart (Vox; Apr. 7)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 1 hr 6 min
    The necessity — and danger — of free speech

    The necessity — and danger — of free speech

    Sean Illing talks with Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan about his new book The Paradox of Democracy, which he co-authored with media studies professor Zac Gershberg. Sean and Margaret discuss the relationship between free expression and democratic society, talk about whether or not the January 6th hearings are doing anything at all politically, and discuss some potential ways to bolster democratic values in the media ecology of the present.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Margaret Sullivan (@Sulliview), media columnist, Washington Post
    References: 


    The Paradox of Democracy: Free Speech, Open Media, and Perilous Persuasion by Zac Gershberg and Sean Illing (Chicago; 2022)


    Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy by Margaret Sullivan (Columbia Global Reports; 2020)


    "Four reasons the Jan. 6 hearings have conquered the news cycle" by Margaret Sullivan (Washington Post; July 22)


    Understanding Media by Marshall McLuhan (1964)


    Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman (1985)


    Newsroom Confidential: Lessons (and Worries) from an Ink-Stained Life by Margaret Sullivan (St. Martin's; Oct. 2022)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
9.6K Ratings

9.6K Ratings

😉💙🙃 ,

6 June 2022. 😉💙🙃

As a parents it is our goal /job to raise androgynous boys and girls.
partly male and partly female in appearance; of indeterminate sex.

Cynthia Davis

womanbyherradio ,

Post-modernism and Stuart Jeffries

Appreciated this deep conversation which made connections to decades of my own perceptions on the world we live in—but Jeffries did the research! I look for this kind of sky-high view to make sense of things. Looking forward to reading Jeffries’ book. Illing jumped fully in on this one and the engagement of the participants was warming.

MasterDev59 ,

Low quality Marxist propaganda

I try to listen to different perspectives and have been a listener for a few years, and have gradually heard the quality decrease. Nowadays it's just unchallenged marxist talking points.

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