435 episodes

A weekly show of constitutional debate hosted by National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen where listeners can hear the best arguments on all sides of the constitutional issues at the center of American life.

We the People National Constitution Center

    • News
    • 4.6 • 943 Ratings

A weekly show of constitutional debate hosted by National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen where listeners can hear the best arguments on all sides of the constitutional issues at the center of American life.

    The Indian Child Welfare Act and the 14th Amendment

    The Indian Child Welfare Act and the 14th Amendment

    On Wednesday, November 9, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Haaland v. Brackeen, a case challenging the Indian Child Welfare Act. Opponents of ICWA say that it violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment, discriminating against non-Native foster parents. Defenders of ICWA say that tribal sovereignty means the relationship of Native people to the US government is political, not racial. Timothy Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute’s Scharf-Norton Center for Constitutional Litigation and Elizabeth Reese of Stanford Law join Jeffrey Rosen to recap the arguments in the case and discuss the future of the Indian Child Welfare Act.
     
    Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.
    Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    You can find transcripts for each episode on the podcast pages in our Media Library.

    • 1 hr
    The Battle for the American West

    The Battle for the American West

    For Native American Heritage Month, the National Constitution Center hotsed a discussion with historians H.W. Brands, author of The Last Campaign: Sherman, Geronimo and the War for America; Lori Daggar, author of Cultivating Empire: Capitalism, Philanthropy, and the Negotiation of American Imperialism in Indian Country; and Lindsay Robertson, author of Conquest by Law: How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands, for a historical overview of U.S. westward expansion, manifest destiny, and the impact on native peoples and tribes. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates.
    Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.
    Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    You can find transcripts for each episode on the podcast pages in our Media Library.
     

    • 58 min
    Thomas Jefferson: The Reader and Writer

    Thomas Jefferson: The Reader and Writer

    Historians Andrew Browning, author of Schools for Statesmen: The Divergent Educations of the Constitutional Framers; Nancy Isenberg, author of Madison and Jefferson; and Thomas Kidd, author of Thomas Jefferson: A Biography of Spirit and Flesh, explore Thomas Jefferson’s life and legacy through the lens of his own education and what he read—and how those influences shaped the American idea. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates.

    Stay Connected and Learn More
    Continue the conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    Please subscribe to Live at the National Constitution Center and our companion podcast We the People on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.
    To watch National Constitution Center Town Hall programs live, check out our schedule of upcoming programs. Register through Zoom to ask your constitutional questions in the Q&A or watch live on YouTube.

    • 59 min
    Affirmative Action and the 14th Amendment – Part 2

    Affirmative Action and the 14th Amendment – Part 2

    On Monday, October 31, 2022, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for more than five hours in Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina, and Students for Fair Admissions v. President and Fellows of Harvard. In this pair of cases, the Supreme Court will assess whether the schools are violating the Equal Protection Clause by using race as a factor in admissions. Ted Shaw of the UNC Center for Civil Rights and David Bernstein of Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University join Jeffrey Rosen to recap the arguments in the case—including the specific questions asked by each of the justices; to discuss how the court will rule next year when it decides the cases; and what the ruling might mean for the interpretation of the 14th Amendment and equality and diversity in high education and American society going forward.
    ·      Listen to “Affirmative Action and the 14th Amendment – Part 1”

    Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.
    Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    You can find transcripts for each episode on the podcast pages in our Media Library.

    • 55 min
    Affirmative Action and the 14th Amendment – Part 1

    Affirmative Action and the 14th Amendment – Part 1

    On Monday, October 31, 2022, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina, and Students for Fair Admissions v. President and Fellows of Harvard. In this pair of cases, the Supreme Court will assess whether the schools are violating the Equal Protection Clause by using race as a factor in admissions. Ted Shaw of the UNC Center for Civil Rights and David Bernstein of Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University join Jeffrey Rosen to examine the text, history, and original understanding of the 14th Amendment and how it relates to affirmative action.
    Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.
    Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    You can find transcripts for each episode on the podcast pages in our Media Library.

    • 56 min
    Pork, the Dormant Commerce Clause, and Legislating Morality

    Pork, the Dormant Commerce Clause, and Legislating Morality

    Last week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in National Pork Producers v. Ross. The case is about a 2018 California ballot initiative, in which voters decided that the state should prohibit the in-state sale of pork from animals confined in a manner inconsistent with California standards. Opponents of the amendment argue that it violates dormant Commerce Clause jurisprudence. Today on We the People, Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of Berkeley Law, and Michael McConnell of Stanford Law join host Jeffrey Rosen discuss whether the Interstate Commerce Clause restricts states from regulating in-state conduct that has a substantial impact on mostly out-of-state producers.
    Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.
    Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.
    Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.
    You can find transcripts for each episode on the podcast pages in our Media Library.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
943 Ratings

943 Ratings

Big House Boy ,

Great!

Love it!!

dennis.karpf ,

Dennis D. Karpf

An excellent presentation of competing progressive and moderate/conservative perspectives. Yet Mr. Rosen fails to question underlying definitions of judicial philosophy as influencing judicial interpretation and construction. A prominent example is the utter failure of Mr. Shaw to define “diversity” as rationalization for race as a consideration in the two college admissions cases in most recent podcast. Indeed none of the SCOTUS justices even raised such fundamental question when invoked by the defendants during oral argument to sidestep issue of the reality of racial preference (under 14th Amendment) by First Amendment claim of “diversity.” Intellectual honesty is not so served.

Constitution Wrangler ,

We The People

Where else can you find substantive debates about and the intellectual basis for our constitutional democracy? Jeffrey Rosen and his team are providing the nation with a free education on ways to argue using the people's document.

Top Podcasts In News

Rachel Maddow, MSNBC
The New York Times
NPR
The Daily Wire
Crooked Media
Cumulus Podcast Network | Dan Bongino

You Might Also Like

Will Baude, Dan Epps
SCOTUSblog
Oyez
Crooked Media
Slate Podcasts
Akhil Reed Amar