39 min

WELL / AWARE Show 007: The $800 Farm-to-Table Sweater with Tempest Bentley Well Aware Podcast

    • Alternative Health

Marissa Goodman Thieriot has invented, and if not invented, certainly modernized, the farm to table sweater with her company Tempest Bentley. From the wool used to create the sweaters, which is harvested from sheep who eat, sleep, drink and play the way they should, by workers who truly care about their trade, to the box and packaging the sweater arrives in and the tags it bears before that first wear. Every step of the way is well-researched,  I was intrigued by this purist approach — as we all know mine is conscious but not nearly this pure as it’s not entirely sustainable — and wanted to find out what drove her to direct this beautiful symphony of mindful manufacturing. The sweaters themselves are absolutely stunning, featuring well stitched, thick cables that are vintage in style but modern in cut and material.





Marissa has a particularly unique perspective on conscious living, as her husband’s family owns a sustainable ranch in California. She’s been able to learn a lot very quickly and shares that knowledge with us. But she also shares the irony and dynamism many of us experience: we wouldn’t be where we are without having worked with large, corporate brands, many of which are now the ones we’re boycotting. It’s a fascinating and dynamic discussion for anyone who’s interested in learning about the slow living movement.

In this interview, we discuss:

– why sustainable sweaters cost $800 (she literally breaks it down!), and why that’s not a terrible price to pay

– our own pasts, how we’re actually reformed children of a material world and how that’s totally OK!

– the problem with bargain shopping for the lowest common denominator

– the significance of a farm-to-table sweater in our lives

– the benefits of living minimally, and how to do it in a way that’s sustainable for you

SHOW NOTES:

Alden Wicker, Episode 3 from the WELL / AWARE Show archives

How to Clean Sweaters over on Upperlyne (written by Marissa Goodman Theiriot, our guest in today’s show)

Marissa Goodman Thieriot has invented, and if not invented, certainly modernized, the farm to table sweater with her company Tempest Bentley. From the wool used to create the sweaters, which is harvested from sheep who eat, sleep, drink and play the way they should, by workers who truly care about their trade, to the box and packaging the sweater arrives in and the tags it bears before that first wear. Every step of the way is well-researched,  I was intrigued by this purist approach — as we all know mine is conscious but not nearly this pure as it’s not entirely sustainable — and wanted to find out what drove her to direct this beautiful symphony of mindful manufacturing. The sweaters themselves are absolutely stunning, featuring well stitched, thick cables that are vintage in style but modern in cut and material.





Marissa has a particularly unique perspective on conscious living, as her husband’s family owns a sustainable ranch in California. She’s been able to learn a lot very quickly and shares that knowledge with us. But she also shares the irony and dynamism many of us experience: we wouldn’t be where we are without having worked with large, corporate brands, many of which are now the ones we’re boycotting. It’s a fascinating and dynamic discussion for anyone who’s interested in learning about the slow living movement.

In this interview, we discuss:

– why sustainable sweaters cost $800 (she literally breaks it down!), and why that’s not a terrible price to pay

– our own pasts, how we’re actually reformed children of a material world and how that’s totally OK!

– the problem with bargain shopping for the lowest common denominator

– the significance of a farm-to-table sweater in our lives

– the benefits of living minimally, and how to do it in a way that’s sustainable for you

SHOW NOTES:

Alden Wicker, Episode 3 from the WELL / AWARE Show archives

How to Clean Sweaters over on Upperlyne (written by Marissa Goodman Theiriot, our guest in today’s show)

39 min