13 episodes

What is Good Food? Five episodes of delicious stories and conversations about how we know what we eat is 'good'. This podcast series is produced by a group of food researchers, and our conversations are based on papers presented at a food research workshop organised by the SOAS Food Studies Centre and University of Warwick Food GRP.

Studio production: Anna Cohen
Editor: Mukta Das
Music: Brandi Simpson Miller

What is Good Food? Researchers affiliated to SOAS Food Studies Centre and partners

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.5 • 2 Ratings

What is Good Food? Five episodes of delicious stories and conversations about how we know what we eat is 'good'. This podcast series is produced by a group of food researchers, and our conversations are based on papers presented at a food research workshop organised by the SOAS Food Studies Centre and University of Warwick Food GRP.

Studio production: Anna Cohen
Editor: Mukta Das
Music: Brandi Simpson Miller

    Ep 5. Food and the construction of value - the view from Morocco and Croatia

    Ep 5. Food and the construction of value - the view from Morocco and Croatia

    What is good food: A conversation about food and the construction of value - with stories from Morocco and Croatia.

    Katharina Graf is a postdoctoral research fellow at the SOAS Food Studies Centre, University of London. Her research interests pertain to the preparation of food, material and social change, gender, urban space, food security, risk and uncertainty, and global food markets. Regionally, she focuses on Morocco, North Africa and the Mediterranean region.

    Anna Colquhoun is a part-time doctoral student, currently based in Croatia for her fieldwork with rural food producers and restaurants. Having previously worked in food professionally, Anna returned to university to study the anthropology of food at the SOAS Food Studies Centre, where she continues her research. Her interests include the social construction of cuisine and place-making and value-creation through food.

    Hosts:
    Katharina Graf
    Anna Colquhoun

    Studio production: Anna Cohen
    Editor: Mukta Das
    Music: Brandi Simpson Miller

    With thanks to SOAS Radio.

    Music credits:
    Double Down by Silent Partner
    Shesh Pesh by JR Tundra
    Gypsy Dance by Topher Mohr and Alex Elena

    • 29 min
    Clip: People expect good food to be affordable as well as not containing any additives (ep 4)

    Clip: People expect good food to be affordable as well as not containing any additives (ep 4)

    "For example the produce that my farmers sell at the farmers' markets can be up to seven and a half times more expensive than conventional produce... 500 grams of spinach at a convention market in China is 20 pence whereas the same 500 grams of organic spinach at a farmers' market is £1.50. People that complain about how expensive that food is expect good food to be affordable as well as not containing any additives. And secondly, at the farmers' markets, the farmers usually make claims about their food being grown without synthetic inputs but they don't have certification so there's a lot of scepticism among potential consumers that pass by about the claims that farmers are making".

    • 1 min
    Clip: MSG - from a symbol of culture and civilisation to "Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" (ep 4)

    Clip: MSG - from a symbol of culture and civilisation to "Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" (ep 4)

    "In Taiwan, MSG has been widely used as a flavour enhancing food additives and in the 1980s and 1990s, nutritional scientists appealed to the public to reduce their consumption of MGS and claimed it caused cancers and allergies and all these diseases - the most famous ones was Chinese Restaurant Syndrome. And this came from a letter published in a medical journal in 1968 from the sender who claimed he felt strange every time he ate at a Chinese restaurant, symptoms such as numbness in the back or the neck, general weakness and so on...and after that there were several reports of serious reactions to Chinese food across the United States and more and more people saw MSG as the cause of their symptoms. But it was exactly the opposite in the 1920s, MSG was considered a more advanced way of cooking. It was a symbol of culture and civilisation"

    • 1 min
    Ep 4: Good food is 'real food'

    Ep 4: Good food is 'real food'

    What is good food: A conversation about 'real food' in and around farmers markets in Shanghai and in food education in Taiwan.

    Leo Pang is a PhD candidate at the SOAS Food Studies Centre. His research is on small organic farmers, farmers’ markets and the farmers’ market organisers in Shanghai. In his thesis Leo examines the issues facing farmers in the marketplace and their relationships with consumers, food marketers and environmental activists. Mingtse Hung is a PhD candidate in the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh. His dissertation focuses on the problematisation of food and how it contributes to the development of food education in Taiwan, shaped bills, local projects, and news reports.

    Hosts:
    Leo Pang
    Mingtse Hung

    Studio production: Anna Cohen
    Editor: Mukta Das
    Music: Brandi Simpson Miller

    With thanks to SOAS Radio.

    Music credits:
    Double Down by Silent Partner
    The Voyage by Asian Feel
    Finding Movement by Kevin Macleod

    • 22 min
    Clip: Uncorrupted, unadulterated, 'good' food is *not* an everyday reality (ep 3)

    Clip: Uncorrupted, unadulterated, 'good' food is *not* an everyday reality (ep 3)

    "One of my main interlocutors is an older lady called Fupu, and she suggests that these agrochemicals have made the environment toxic, and that all food today is 'bhejal'. So actually in my research I look at the opposite of good food, through that of 'bhejal' food. While good food is maybe the norm, it is the corrupted, adulterated, impure foods that is the everyday reality of my interlocutors and of many Bangladeshis."

    • 30 sec
    Clip: People have described it as a meatier taste, a gamier taste (ep 3)

    Clip: People have described it as a meatier taste, a gamier taste (ep 3)

    "Ruminants that are raised on grasslands, because they are using more of their muscles, those muscles develop a deeper flavour, because they are consuming a wider variety of grasses. The flavour is also complex. The 'terrior' of their landscape you could say, is indeed translated into the flavour of that meat giving it a - people have described it as a meatier taste, a gamier taste, there is a depth and complexity of flavour, that is not considered very desirable quite frankly by the majority of Americans consumers at this point."

    • 42 sec

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