41 episodes

Professor Elizabeth Joh teaches Intro to Constitutional Law and most of the time this is a pretty straight forward job. But with Trump in office, everything has changed. Five minutes before class Professor Joh checks Twitter to find out what the 45th President has said and how it jibes with 200 years of the judicial branch interpreting and ruling on the Constitution. Hosted by acclaimed podcaster Roman Mars (99% Invisible, co-founder Radiotopia), this show is a weekly, fun, casual Con Law 101 class that uses the tumultuous and erratic activities of the executive branch under Trump to teach us all about the US Constitution. Proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law Radiotopia

    • Government
    • 4.7, 2.9K Ratings

Professor Elizabeth Joh teaches Intro to Constitutional Law and most of the time this is a pretty straight forward job. But with Trump in office, everything has changed. Five minutes before class Professor Joh checks Twitter to find out what the 45th President has said and how it jibes with 200 years of the judicial branch interpreting and ruling on the Constitution. Hosted by acclaimed podcaster Roman Mars (99% Invisible, co-founder Radiotopia), this show is a weekly, fun, casual Con Law 101 class that uses the tumultuous and erratic activities of the executive branch under Trump to teach us all about the US Constitution. Proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

    40- Jacobson and COVID

    40- Jacobson and COVID

    In mid-April, 2020, states are beginning to explore ways to re-open their economies amid the global coronavirus pandemic. But with states devising their own paths forward, many are wondering what powers the government has, even during a national emergency. Are the states violating our civil liberties by enforcing these lockdowns? To answer this question, many legal scholars are looking to a 115-year-old Supreme Court case for answers, Jacobson v. Massachusetts.

    • 30 min
    39- Quarantine Powers

    39- Quarantine Powers

    During a health crisis, what is the government allowed to do? As the novel coronavirus spreads across America, there have been closures and lockdowns across the country. In this episode, we look to history to understand who has the power to quarantine, and how the office of the president can be used to slow down a pandemic.

    • 32 min
    38- Prosecutorial Discretion

    38- Prosecutorial Discretion

    Prosecutors recommended that Roger Stone, an associate of Donald Trump, be given a heavy penalty after being convicted of seven felony counts, including lying to authorities. But after intervention from Attorney General Barr, and tweets from the President, those recommendations were rescinded. What can his case tell us about presidential interference and prosecutorial discretion?

    • 34 min
    37- War Powers and Impeachment Update

    37- War Powers and Impeachment Update

    After Donald Trump ordered the killing of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani, many wondered if the two countries were on the brink of a major conflict. This incident is only the latest in the long-standing fight between Congress and the President over who has the power to make war, and if an act of violence against another state can be legitimate without Congressional approval.

    This episode also includes an update on the Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which began earlier this week.

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    • 35 min
    36- Bribery

    36- Bribery

    Bribery is one of the three offenses listed in the Constitution as grounds for impeachment. Even though that is attempting to bribe Ukraine is the act that precipitated to Trump’s impeachment, it’s not explicitly listed in the articles of impeachment. Why is that?

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    • 30 min
    35- Confrontation Clause

    35- Confrontation Clause

    Since the beginning of the impeachment proceedings against the President, Donald Trump has insisted he has a right to confront “the whistleblower,” the anonymous member of the intelligence community who set the whole thing in motion. There is a Confrontation Clause in the Sixth Amendment of the United States Constitution, which says a defendant in a criminal case has the right to face their accuser. But does this clause apply to the impeachment hearing against a president in Congress?

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

J. Samo ,

Thank goodness this podcast exists.

We need this. Thank you, Roman!

MNNuke ,

Great legal - nonpartisan - discussion

I think this is an incredibly well done podcast that helps educate lay individuals on what the U.S. Constitution really says, how it's been applied. If you're looking for absolutes, this program does not generally provide absolutes. If you're looking for what the Constitution really says (rather than what is implied) and how has the Supreme Court interpreted the Constitution in the past, this is a grfeat resource. As is generally the case with the law the answer to whether something is legal frequently is that "it depends". The program makes that point in the very first episode and comes back to that pretty consistently. It dependes on the specifics of the case, it depends on the judge's legal perspective and philosophy, and can depend on past decisions.

Each podcast is only about 13 - 15 minutes and works to avoid getting into clearly partisan wrangling, but focuses on what the Constitution says. Very helpful to gain perspective on what's going on.

Seancasm ,

Are you tired of snowflakes?

If you want researched insight and theory as to why Trump isn’t good at his job, then this will outline it for you.

Instead, if you spend your days “ownin’ libs” then you should probably keep scrolling. There are some good podcasts on how to deal with gaslighting that you should check out.

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