48 min

What's Eating You? p.2 hello X

    • Daily News

Salmon, seaweed, or wormballs on the menu in 2068? Can we really manage nature? And what’s the matter with humans anyway?
Five polar scientists discuss how future (and present-day) humans fit into the Arctic bioenergetic food system. Why might X benefit from eating more vegetables (or being one)? Do humans want to farm in the sea with the same strategies used on land? What is multi-trophic aquaculture?
Meet Lis Lindal Jørgensen, marine biologist at the Institute of Marine Research in Tromsø and leader of the FRAM (High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment) flagship research program on Effects of climate change on sea and coastal ecology in the north), Pedro Duarte, researcher at the Norwegian Polar Institute specializing in Arctic marine ecosystem modeling and contributor to the FRAM flagship research program on Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, technology and agreements, Elina Haltunnen, marine biologist at the Institute of Marine Research specializing in the impacts of aquaculture on wild fish, Ann Eileen Lennert, environmental anthropologist with Ice-9 and the Polar Museum at University of Tromsø (hear more about Ann Eileen in episode 1), and Sigurd Tønnessen, philosopher of science at University of Tromsø and member of the Environmental Philosophy Research Group.
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/IMG_2006.JPG)
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/ep4_whats+eating+you_workshop_web.jpeg)
Hear also about the hello X March to the Future a parade through the streets of central Tromsø behind a ceremonial ship of dreams wearing seaweed and boats on our heads and led by the epic all-female drum corps, the Tromsø Tamborene. Check out links below to videos, pictures, and press coverage from the March to the Future. Email us a voicememo at helloX@ice-9.no and tell us what time it is on the clock of the earth. Thanks to Chin Keeler, Mikey Weinkove, the Tromsø Tamborene, Northern Norway Art Museum, and Polaria Science Center, Vårscenefest… and special thanks to all the amazing participants!
Finally, Christine’s 12-yr old nephew Sebastian speculates on what his future daughter might cook him for dinner in 2068.
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/future-3209.jpg)
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/future-3236.jpg)
March to the Future convocation:
Welcome earthlings.
We welcome you all to the other side of today. This former post office, police office, art museum… What do you picture here in 2068? A virtual playground, a makeshift hospital, a beach?
Salutations from your unborn children, your thriving grandchildren, and great grandchildren. If you remember us, we may remember you.
Before all of us, there were all of you. Before all of you, one hundred billion homo sapiens walked this planet. Every single one had a story. From the Gállá-bártnit, descended from the sun, to the driftwood that made Ask and Embla, to our mitochondrial Eve.
Every single one of you in 2018 is living a story. Each life is a story to be told, re-mixed, told again.

Salmon, seaweed, or wormballs on the menu in 2068? Can we really manage nature? And what’s the matter with humans anyway?
Five polar scientists discuss how future (and present-day) humans fit into the Arctic bioenergetic food system. Why might X benefit from eating more vegetables (or being one)? Do humans want to farm in the sea with the same strategies used on land? What is multi-trophic aquaculture?
Meet Lis Lindal Jørgensen, marine biologist at the Institute of Marine Research in Tromsø and leader of the FRAM (High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment) flagship research program on Effects of climate change on sea and coastal ecology in the north), Pedro Duarte, researcher at the Norwegian Polar Institute specializing in Arctic marine ecosystem modeling and contributor to the FRAM flagship research program on Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, technology and agreements, Elina Haltunnen, marine biologist at the Institute of Marine Research specializing in the impacts of aquaculture on wild fish, Ann Eileen Lennert, environmental anthropologist with Ice-9 and the Polar Museum at University of Tromsø (hear more about Ann Eileen in episode 1), and Sigurd Tønnessen, philosopher of science at University of Tromsø and member of the Environmental Philosophy Research Group.
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/IMG_2006.JPG)
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/ep4_whats+eating+you_workshop_web.jpeg)
Hear also about the hello X March to the Future a parade through the streets of central Tromsø behind a ceremonial ship of dreams wearing seaweed and boats on our heads and led by the epic all-female drum corps, the Tromsø Tamborene. Check out links below to videos, pictures, and press coverage from the March to the Future. Email us a voicememo at helloX@ice-9.no and tell us what time it is on the clock of the earth. Thanks to Chin Keeler, Mikey Weinkove, the Tromsø Tamborene, Northern Norway Art Museum, and Polaria Science Center, Vårscenefest… and special thanks to all the amazing participants!
Finally, Christine’s 12-yr old nephew Sebastian speculates on what his future daughter might cook him for dinner in 2068.
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/future-3209.jpg)
(https://s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/hellox/images/future-3236.jpg)
March to the Future convocation:
Welcome earthlings.
We welcome you all to the other side of today. This former post office, police office, art museum… What do you picture here in 2068? A virtual playground, a makeshift hospital, a beach?
Salutations from your unborn children, your thriving grandchildren, and great grandchildren. If you remember us, we may remember you.
Before all of us, there were all of you. Before all of you, one hundred billion homo sapiens walked this planet. Every single one had a story. From the Gállá-bártnit, descended from the sun, to the driftwood that made Ask and Embla, to our mitochondrial Eve.
Every single one of you in 2018 is living a story. Each life is a story to be told, re-mixed, told again.

48 min

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