29 episodes

Comparative Musicology. Sometimes Interviews. The old format (which might return) was basically a series about songs that have been covered often and by a wide-range of artists. We'll listen to the original, discuss it and then listen to/talk about the most interesting cover versions. The old format might return again.

Where's That Sound Coming From‪?‬ Where's That Sound Coming From?

    • Music
    • 4.9 • 10 Ratings

Comparative Musicology. Sometimes Interviews. The old format (which might return) was basically a series about songs that have been covered often and by a wide-range of artists. We'll listen to the original, discuss it and then listen to/talk about the most interesting cover versions. The old format might return again.

    Ep. 28/FOITA Ep. 2 - Live 1967

    Ep. 28/FOITA Ep. 2 - Live 1967

    Brian and Joeman are back, this time to discuss what each of them truly believe to be one of the most exciting live albums, right up there with Buck Owens' Carnegie Hall Concert, The Rolling Stones' Get Yr Ya-Ya's Out and KISS Alive! The album in question? The Monkees' Live 1967, released with little fanfare by Rhino in the summer of 1987, and compiled from three concerts in August '67, during a two month summer tour during which they played as a self-contained psychedelic/garage/jangle-pop quartet. Despite both of us purchasing this episode’s featured album the same summer at the same place (Newbury Comics in Harvard Square), Joeman (John Hendrickson) and I did not yet know each other in the summer of 1987. But we did both belong to an exclusive demographic: Late 80’s adolescent Monkees freaks that were also 1) feverishly absorbing as much rock and roll history as possible (so we knew what was what) and 2) enthusiastically pursuing an instrument (Joeman=guitar; Brian=drums) because each of us had already noticed that life did not appear to get much more fun than being in a good rock band.In the relative dark ages of 1987, it was easy to be surprised by a new release by a beloved artist. Being informed took much more work. And that was cool! The pleasantly unexpected is harder to come by in the 21st century.Neither of us saw Monkees Live 1967 coming and it flipped both of us out irreversibly. It’s indeed a perfect presentation.—One’s FIRST impression upon seeing the album cover for the first time: These are four guys serious about being in a band. No pearly white smiles, no embarrassing outfits or goofball expressions, just the guys at work. Guitar necks and drumsticks are seen being put to work. All with a subtle psychedelic glow contrasting with the black background. Excellent job by whomever at the Rhino Art Dept was responsible, because…—One’s LAST impression, should one listen to the full album, is shock, exhilaration, joy, ready to take on the f*****g world!! The promise of the album cover is paid in full, with interest! Why? Because the last song echoing in the listener’s ears, a 5 minute “Stepping Stone” with a perfect psychedelic jam and nods to their new buddy Hendrix, is simply, still, one of the few live recordings that kills me EVERY time (The Who’s “A Quick One” from the Rock and Roll Circus and the Grateful Dead’s “Morning Dew” from Cornell 1977 are the other two that come to mind). Listened to out of context, one might mistake the freakout section for Syd-era Floyd or Cale-era VU—except for the screaming girls in the background. It's so good. For this fleeting moment in Monkees history, they wanted to tour as a real band and play the songs the way THEY wanted to play them. Indeed, The Monkees succeeded in creating a unique sound between the four of them, and it worked. For a certain breed of Monkees fans--the ones who identify more with the music--especially the music they weren't supposed to create--more than the TV series,  Live '67 is a personal victory—vindication that they were a very cool REAL band, even if for a very short time. It should’ve been a victory for the four Monkees at the time, because what we hear is audio proof that in the summer of 1967 they could get as freaky in concert as anyone at Monterey Pop, and rock harder than some of their contemporaries. But nope- the weirder they got, the fewer albums they sold. They’d keep a percentage of mainstream oldies fans that would crop up with each subsequent reunion, but then there are those like Joeman and myself, who represent the formidable, insatiable, nuanced fan. And Live 1967 was most likely the radioactive spider that bit us and others like us back in the summer of ‘87, setting us on this bizarre path. Join us as we start to explore this excellent live album.

    • 46 min
    Ep. 27/FOITA Ep. 1

    Ep. 27/FOITA Ep. 1

    The pilot episode of Freaking Out in the Afternoon, a Monkee-centric podcast produced by Where's That Sound Coming From and cohosted by myself and my old friend Joeman. In this first episode we discuss how we first discovered The Monkees, what reeled us in, concert stories from '86-97 and, well, why in the world would two well-educated, well-travelled, well-read, musically well-rounded grown men continue to heed the call whenever the great Monkee Signal appears in the sky. We grapple with that conundrum as well as celebrate it. Peppered with fun sound bites and introducing the recurring Song of the Moment. We're still figuring out what works and not, so feel free to send emails to wheresthatsoundcomingfrom@gmail.com. 

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Ep. ## - Introducing FREAKING OUT IN THE AFTERNOON

    Ep. ## - Introducing FREAKING OUT IN THE AFTERNOON

    "And now, from the elegant pump room of the magnificent Palmer House..." This is not a real episode, but a mini 10 minute announcement (with fun soundbites). I'll explain. Wanting to keep podcasting, but not jazzed about going back to the old format, I finally entertained the great suggestion of my old friend, and fellow rock geek, John Hendrickson, that he and I team up and co-host a "sidecast" which deals in seldom-explored aspects of...THE MONKEES. Their final tour was announced recently, and so it seemed the mood was right. When combining the totals, John and I have seen The Monkees and/or solo endeavors close to 50 times since 1987. That's a total guess. Maybe it's more like 30.. We'll find out together. On one hand we want to talk about our personal experiences as Monkees fans--it's a lonely road a lot of the time.. The peaks (the first time hearing "Circle Sky") and valleys (our personal "Marge Simpson Monkees Lunchbox Moment"). John and I are both lifelong musicians. We're also equally admiring of old school punk rock as we are The Grateful Dead. So our knowledge comes from a deep well of having listened to, read about and played a LOT of music in our lives. Which is why we also want to explore things like "why Eddie Hoh's drumming defines much of the best Monkees songs". Or "Nesmith's best rhythm guitar work" or "Davy ballad that went from worst to first as we got older". Oh, and there will occasionally be special guests! We have two lined up already! Anyway, stay tuned. This will be fun.

    • 10 min
    Ep. 26 - The Beach Boys and The Grateful Dead Part 3: Honest. Not Perfect.

    Ep. 26 - The Beach Boys and The Grateful Dead Part 3: Honest. Not Perfect.

    In Part Three (of three) of this miniseries on The Beach Beach Boys and The Grateful Dead, we finally reach our destination in space and time--the Fillmore East on April 27, 1971. This is a two hour episode, and in it, I compare and contrast the career arcs of each band leading up to the gig. In 1970, The Beach Boys released a single, "Add Some Music To Your Day", which only reached #64 on the US pop chart. This was embarrassing for them because it reaffirmed how unpopular they'd become. In 1970, The Grateful Dead released a single, "Truckin'", which only reached #64 on the US pop chart. This was embarrassing for them because #64 was perilously close to the Top 40--which was a place they had no intention of getting cozy with. Still, despite the two bands' contrasting ideas of success, there was a great admiration between them as well as shared influences. I read from several accounts of this concert, from books and articles, and note the wide contrast between descriptions. The subtitle of this episode, "Honest. Not Perfect.", comes from a snatch of Brian Wilson studio chatter in early 1967. He's instructing his brother Carl on how to sing a certain part and says that "it doesn't have to be perfect, just kind of honest", and I took that phrase and unpacked it. Threw stuff everywhere. In fact I made quite a philosophical/psychological/psychedelicized mess all over the place and hope you can deal with it. The reward is the concert. Dennis and Billy having a blast despite very different drumming styles. Carl and Jerry trading a solo. Bobby, Al and Carl singing together. The Fillmore Dead audience cheering wildly for The Beach Boys (drowning out the one or two hecklers). I hope you enjoy this episode and thanks for listening. 

    • 2 hr 10 min
    Ep. 25 - The Beach Boys and the Grateful Dead Pt.2: R(h)onda, 1974 and Pregaming for the FillmoreEast

    Ep. 25 - The Beach Boys and the Grateful Dead Pt.2: R(h)onda, 1974 and Pregaming for the FillmoreEast

    So it looks like there’s going to be a Part 3 to this madness, since we haven’t arrived at the Fillmore East yet. My apologetic tone is facetious, of course, because this has been nothing but fun for me. I hope my self-indulgence is slightly more entertaining/enlightening than annoying? Anyway, this episode takes a look at the evolution of the song “Help Me, Rhonda” through all its changes between 1965-80, from its spelling to its instrumental and vocal arrangement to the lyrics to who sings lead which year. I use its evolution as a metaphor for the changes in pop music, its artists and its fans during that time period. Then we take a brief look at the bill the two featured bands were on together on June 8, 1974 (didn’t play with each other though). Finally, as a “pregaming” exercise for the Fillmore East show, we take a look at some other versions of the songs the two bands played together. Both bands sure loved The Coasters! An oddly paced, oddly weighted episode, but imagine that we hit traffic on the way to the Fillmore East and took a strange alternate route.

    • 1 hr 24 min
    Ep. 24 - The Beach Boys and The Grateful Dead Part 1 or Are You Kind? I Know They Must Be Kind

    Ep. 24 - The Beach Boys and The Grateful Dead Part 1 or Are You Kind? I Know They Must Be Kind

    Initially, this was supposed to be a straight forward episode in which I'd examine what occured on April 27, 1971 at the Fillmore East, and what led up to it. This was the night that Jerry Garcia invited "another famous California band" up onstage and out came...The Beach Boys! A seemingly unlikely combination of bands, their off-the-cuff mini set sounded a lot more listenable than the vast majority of "come on up and jam" type situations I've heard, either live or on tape. Why? Well, that's what I wanted to explore, and, like Brian Wilson adding parts to SMiLE only to find it kept needed redefinition, I kept adding elements to my script until I realized that I needed to make this a two parter and that part 1 wouldn't even get to the Fillmore East. The theme of this episode is like a Beach Boys song in that it seeks to find all the harmonious relationships between elements of the two bands (and, thus, perhaps, fans of one that think they don't like the other). But the structure of this episode is a bit like certain Grateful Dead songs, which start and end with strength and purpose, but a little meandering happens in the middle while trying to figure out which road leads to the destination. This is sort of a love letter to both bands (mostly concentrating on 1966-73, my favorite eras of each), and during this terrible year, they've each been of great comfort. This episode includes lots of musical montages, discussions of music, LSD, Charles Lloyd, Phil Spector, Yo La Tengo and...well, just listen. And short answer as to why The Beach Boys and Grateful Dead would sound ok playing together without any rehearsal is, they're both bands that know how to listen.  

    • 2 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Sir Winningham ,

The Prison

Thank you so much for the episode on The Prison. It has been an extremely enjoyable and meaningful work for me since I first heard it when the first cd version was released. I am hopeful you will be able to complete a book on this topic.

Paul From The Band Mercy Choir ,

A comprehensive, dazzling, and fun podcast for true music geeks

What a joy to discover this wonderful podcast, perfect for lovers of obscure music trivia and minutiae. Whether you know and love or know and hate or are about to discover the songs discussed here, you will surely be entertained. Brian does an excellent job engaging the listener with his charming factoids an antidotes. Additionally, you just may find a new version of your very favorite song. Every episode is essential for music nerds. Thanks, Brian!

ItchyShirt ,

A joy to listen to

A podcast that speaks directly to my trivia-lovin' heart. Brian is more than just a music fan, he's a musician himself, and he brings such unique insights to the program. There's nothing quite like this out there in the pod-o-sphere, and you'll marvel at the weird ways the likes of Jerry Garcia and Michael Nesmith manage to sneak their way into practically every other episde.

Top Podcasts In Music

The Black Effect and iHeartPodcasts
Double Elvis | Amazon Music
Barstool Sports
The Joe Budden Network
Vulture
Rory Farrell & Jamil "Mal" Clay