27 min

Pioneering the Integrative Health Space | Episode 54 WholisticMatters Podcast Series

    • Alternative Health

Recorded live at the 2019 Integrative Health Symposium in New York City, this podcast features Erika Schwartz, MD, pioneer in the field of integrative medicine and founder of Evolved Science, a concierge medical practice in New York City. Dr. Schwartz is the author of seven books, most recently “The Intimacy Solution.”

John Troup, PhD, talked to Dr. Schwartz about how she became interested in the integrative and functional medicine space. Dr. Schwartz started out working at a trauma center early in her career and also worked in internal medicine. She became interested in supplemental nutrition in 1999 after constantly talking to patients who complained of fatigue.

Then, she started asking patients about their diet, sleep habits, alcohol consumption, exercise, and stress levels. “In the mid-90s, this was so novel that they thought I became a psychiatrist,” Schwartz explained. “But what I actually became was a better doctor.”

Schwartz became increasingly interested in learning about what other options existed to offer fatigued patients, instead of waiting for something more serious to happen. She ultimately went into private practice because she wanted to have continuity of care, to meet her patients and know more about them.

Recorded live at the 2019 Integrative Health Symposium in New York City, this podcast features Erika Schwartz, MD, pioneer in the field of integrative medicine and founder of Evolved Science, a concierge medical practice in New York City. Dr. Schwartz is the author of seven books, most recently “The Intimacy Solution.”

John Troup, PhD, talked to Dr. Schwartz about how she became interested in the integrative and functional medicine space. Dr. Schwartz started out working at a trauma center early in her career and also worked in internal medicine. She became interested in supplemental nutrition in 1999 after constantly talking to patients who complained of fatigue.

Then, she started asking patients about their diet, sleep habits, alcohol consumption, exercise, and stress levels. “In the mid-90s, this was so novel that they thought I became a psychiatrist,” Schwartz explained. “But what I actually became was a better doctor.”

Schwartz became increasingly interested in learning about what other options existed to offer fatigued patients, instead of waiting for something more serious to happen. She ultimately went into private practice because she wanted to have continuity of care, to meet her patients and know more about them.

27 min

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