13 episodes

The Women's & Gender Studies Program fosters critical awareness and intellectual sensitivity to women's issues, the relationship between gender and other aspects of “identity,” including race, class, age, religion and sexuality, methods inflected by the interdisciplinary of women's studies, and how the academic study of women's issues and gender has the power to transform lives.

The late Dr. Laura C. Harris was a pioneer in the medical profession and the embodiment of the Denison ideal. A member of the Class of 1916 (earning the Ph.B., or Bachelor of Philosophy), Dr. Harris was the first woman ever to receive a medical degree from Syracuse University. She also did post-graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania before beginning her medical practice in New York in the 1920s.

A pioneer medical educator among women, she was appointed clinical professor of pediatrics at the State University of New York Medical Center at Syracuse. Her teaching career spanned more than 30 years. In 1951, Dr. Harris was honored with a Denison Alumni Citation and in 1981 with an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. She died in 1987 at the age of 93.

The Laura C. Harris Endowment, the result of a major bequest from Dr. Harris’ estate, stands as a tribute to her memory, evidence of her clear commitment to women’s achievement and reinforcement of her belief in the importance of undergraduate education. The objective of the Laura C. Harris Symposium is to enhance and promote the education of young women as students and as professionals and serve to promote the career opportunities and carry on the pioneering spirit of women students at Denison University.

Women's & Gender Studies Denison University

    • Courses

The Women's & Gender Studies Program fosters critical awareness and intellectual sensitivity to women's issues, the relationship between gender and other aspects of “identity,” including race, class, age, religion and sexuality, methods inflected by the interdisciplinary of women's studies, and how the academic study of women's issues and gender has the power to transform lives.

The late Dr. Laura C. Harris was a pioneer in the medical profession and the embodiment of the Denison ideal. A member of the Class of 1916 (earning the Ph.B., or Bachelor of Philosophy), Dr. Harris was the first woman ever to receive a medical degree from Syracuse University. She also did post-graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania before beginning her medical practice in New York in the 1920s.

A pioneer medical educator among women, she was appointed clinical professor of pediatrics at the State University of New York Medical Center at Syracuse. Her teaching career spanned more than 30 years. In 1951, Dr. Harris was honored with a Denison Alumni Citation and in 1981 with an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. She died in 1987 at the age of 93.

The Laura C. Harris Endowment, the result of a major bequest from Dr. Harris’ estate, stands as a tribute to her memory, evidence of her clear commitment to women’s achievement and reinforcement of her belief in the importance of undergraduate education. The objective of the Laura C. Harris Symposium is to enhance and promote the education of young women as students and as professionals and serve to promote the career opportunities and carry on the pioneering spirit of women students at Denison University.

    • video
    Scandalous Voices

    Scandalous Voices

    The Robbins Hunter Museum in partnership with Denison University presents “Scandalous Voices: Journalistic Truths,” a roundtable featuring approaches to current concerns in the news media.

    “Scandalous Voices: Journalistic Truths” is about the media’s accountability for journalistic “truths” and “falsities.” The roundtable is part of a three-year program celebrating the interests and concerns of Victoria Claflin Woodhull, a native of Homer, Ohio, and the first woman to run for U.S. President in 1870.

    Woodhull and her sister were the primary contributors and editors of a newspaper, The Weekly, known for its radical views, some of which are still quite controversial today. Many of the issues the sisters approached are still relevant- woman’s rights, labor laws, and revealing frauds on Wall Street.

    This roundtable’s discussion, the second in a series, will tie the sisters’ interests to today’s issues of journalistic integrity, relationships between the media and administration, and the need for visible truth in media.

    Speakers include Max Abelson, Bloomberg News and Business Week; Myra MacPherson, Washington Post and CNN; Julie Carr-Smyth, Associated Press; and Mary Yost, Columbus Dispatch. It will be moderated by Sally Crane Cox, former editor of the Granville Sentinel.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    • video
    Yours For Humanity - Abby

    Yours For Humanity - Abby

    The Laura C. Harris Series presents “Yours for Humanity – Abby,” an inspiring one-woman play based on the letters and speeches of Abby Kelley Foster (1811-1877), a radical abolitionist and women’s rights activist. Despite constant harassment and intense ridicule, Foster lectured across the country for twenty years, nearly two of which were in Ohio. Celebrate Women’s History Month and experience Foster’s world when social and political differences divided the United States – a time not unlike our own. Lynne McKenney Lydick, an actress, activist, and mother of three, has portrayed Foster since the play premiered in 2004 as a program for the Worcester Women’s History Project.

    • 31 min
    • video
    Activist Workshop

    Activist Workshop

    The Laura C. Harris Series welcomes Rachel Marco-Havens, a “solutionary” artist, performer, activist, facilitator, and storyteller. She currently serves as advisor for the Center of Earth Ethics and as a UN representative for the Wittenberg Center focusing on indigenous and environmental issues. Joined by faculty and local activists Carol Apacki, Rita Kipp, and Ceciel Shaw, Marco-Havens will lead an Activist Workshop focused on how to effectively and efficiently engage as grassroots organizers and activists on the local, state, and national scale. Workshop participants will develop an action plan to address a selected issue and propel the movement forward.

    During her visit to Denison, Marco-Havens will visit classes on Wednesday, Feb. 7 and Thursday, Feb. 8. Also, she will take part in the Courageous Voices Roundtable at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 8, at the Robbins Hunter Museum. The roundtable is the first event of a three-year program of the museum to celebrate Victoria Claflin Woodhull, a native of Homer, Ohio, and the first woman to run for U.S. President in 1870. Marco-Havens will be one of four panel members moderated by Judith Dann, a professor at Columbus State Community College, who will also deliver the opening remarks. Carol Apacki, Rita Kipp, and Ceciel Shaw round out the panel. Using the backdrop of Woodhull’s own courageous voice, Rachel, the panelists will introduce their stories and their community activism work.

    • 1 hr 48 min
    • video
    Hidden Human Computers

    Hidden Human Computers

    The Laura C. Harris Series welcomes author, academic and legal scholar Duchess Harris. Harris’ book, “Hidden Human Computers: The Black Women of NASA,” tells the story of her grandmother and other black women who made it possible for John Glenn to orbit Earth in 1962.

    Professor Harris is the chair of the american studies department at Macalester College. She is the author of four books. In addition to “Hidden Human Computers: The Black Women of NASA,” Harris co-authored “Black Lives Matter: with Sue Bradford Edwards. She also authored “Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton/Obama,” and published an edited volume with Bruce Baum, “Racially Writing the Republic: Racists, Race Rebels, and Transformations of American Identity.”

    • 42 min
    • video
    Q&A: Gabrielle Civil in Performance

    Q&A: Gabrielle Civil in Performance

    The Laura C. Harris Series welcomes performance artist and scholar-in-residence Gabrielle Civil for a solo performance titled “Q&A: Gabrielle Civil in Performance.” The first part of the performance, “Live Art Action,” will run from 1 to 5 p.m. Audiences are welcome to drop by or to hang out for any or all of the four-hour long performance. The second part of the performance includes an “Artist Talk Back” beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the same location.

    Gabrielle Civil has premiered over 40 original solo and collaborative performance works around the world. Recent works include “…hewn and forged…” at the Salt Lake City Performance Art Festival; “Call and Response” for Obsidian’s “Experiments in Joy;” “Say My Name (an action for 270 abducted Nigerian girls);” and “Fugue (Da, Montreal)” at the Hemispheric Institute Encuentro. Her writing has appeared in Small Axe, Obsidian, Asterix, Rain Taxi, and other publications and her performance memoir, “Swallow the Fish” was published by Civil Coping Mechanisms Press in 2017.

    At Denison, Civil holds the 2017-2018 Laura C. Harris Scholar-in-Residence position, a highly competitive one-year position that brings together a scholar and their work with students over the duration of an academic year. In the second semester of her residency, Civil will work with students to present her current project, titled “Activating / Performance \ Activism,” to be premiered on April 19, 2018.

    • 35 min
    • video
    Transnational Feminism Roundtable

    Transnational Feminism Roundtable

    The Laura C. Harris Symposium holds a Transnational Feminism Roundtable as part of this year’s symposium theme titled “Leaderful Feminist Futures.” The panel discussion include transnational feminist scholars Margo Okazawa-Rey from San Francisco State University, Amy Lind from University of Cincinnati, Christine Keating from University of Washington, Simona Sharoni from Merrimack College, and Laila Farah from Depaul University.

    • 52 min

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