100 episodes

On the first episode of the Work in Sports podcast, Carl Manteau of the Milwaukee Bucks said, “I’ve always enjoyed sharing insight into working in the sports industry, the things I wish I knew when I was starting out. I love the idea of this podcast, and I’m thrilled to be a part of it.”



That summarized this whole project beautifully.



I’m Brian Clapp, Director of Content for WorkinSports.com and the host of the Work in Sports podcast. I’m sharing all of my best career advice gathered over 25 years in the sports industry, and I’m bringing in a bunch of old and new friends to do that same.



We’re sharing our knowledge with you, so that you can be better prepared to make your mark in the sports industry. Friends like Colleen Scoles, Philadelphia Eagles, Talent Acquisition Manager (episode 5), Mark Crepeau, Basketball Hall of Fame VP of Marketing (episode 8), Josh Rawitch, Arizona Diamondbacks Sr. VP of Content and Communication (episode 18), Chris Fritzsching, Detroit Lions Director of Football Education and many more.



Every Wednesday I bring in a special sports industry guest, like the names listed above. And every Monday and Friday I go solo, digging deep into a fan question related to working in the sports industry. Topics like, are sports conferences worth attending (episode 22)? What are the best entry level sports jobs (episode 17)? How do I prepare for a sports interview (episode 14)?



We’re covering everything related to sports careers, so if you want to make your love of sports more than just a hobby or escape, this is the place to learn more!

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers Brian Clapp - Work in Sports

    • Sports
    • 4.9, 199 Ratings

On the first episode of the Work in Sports podcast, Carl Manteau of the Milwaukee Bucks said, “I’ve always enjoyed sharing insight into working in the sports industry, the things I wish I knew when I was starting out. I love the idea of this podcast, and I’m thrilled to be a part of it.”



That summarized this whole project beautifully.



I’m Brian Clapp, Director of Content for WorkinSports.com and the host of the Work in Sports podcast. I’m sharing all of my best career advice gathered over 25 years in the sports industry, and I’m bringing in a bunch of old and new friends to do that same.



We’re sharing our knowledge with you, so that you can be better prepared to make your mark in the sports industry. Friends like Colleen Scoles, Philadelphia Eagles, Talent Acquisition Manager (episode 5), Mark Crepeau, Basketball Hall of Fame VP of Marketing (episode 8), Josh Rawitch, Arizona Diamondbacks Sr. VP of Content and Communication (episode 18), Chris Fritzsching, Detroit Lions Director of Football Education and many more.



Every Wednesday I bring in a special sports industry guest, like the names listed above. And every Monday and Friday I go solo, digging deep into a fan question related to working in the sports industry. Topics like, are sports conferences worth attending (episode 22)? What are the best entry level sports jobs (episode 17)? How do I prepare for a sports interview (episode 14)?



We’re covering everything related to sports careers, so if you want to make your love of sports more than just a hobby or escape, this is the place to learn more!

    Kevin Brown: Detroit Red Wings Director of Community Relations & Director of the Detroit Red Wings Foundation

    Kevin Brown: Detroit Red Wings Director of Community Relations & Director of the Detroit Red Wings Foundation

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp VP of Content and Engaged learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…







    Community relations is food for the soul of an organization. 







    Still one of my favorite quotes. It’s from an anonymous CEO, I’d give credit if I could.







    And it’s a true statement. When most departments of an organization are focused on internally beneficial revenue creation, it is the community relations department that is focused on more outwardly impactful projects. 







    They are literally giving, with no intention to receive anything but joy and fulfillment. 







    But, even though the quote hits the mark on the spirit of community relations, it’s purpose and mission, it doesn’t take into account the actual scope of the job. 







    What we see from the outside are hundreds of events each year utilizing the reach and power of a team brand and its athletes to make a difference in the local community. Support for education, the military, cancer survivors, blood drives, coaching -- that what we see, and are moved by as human beings.







    But when we talk about the job, when we talk about Community Relations as a career, yes it starts with caring about the people and the causes -- but it also requires elite skills. Event management, marketing, promotions, budgeting, staffing, leadership skills, and more are required to impact and change the local community. 







    It starts with heart, but it requires skill.  







    Today’s guest is a shining example of that mix, a combination of elite skill and unrivaled passion and enthusiasm for making a positive change the world. 







    Kevin Brown is the Director of Community Relations for the Detroit Red Wings and the Director of the Detroit Red Wings Foundation -- it’s my pleasure to have him as our guest 







    Here we go -- let’s dive into the world of community relations with Kevin Brown…















    Questions for Kevin Brown, Detroit Red Wings Director of Community Relations and Director of the Detroit Red Wings Foundation







    1: Let’s start with an easy one – in your opinion why is community relations such an important part of the sports industry?







    2: Early in your career you worked with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and like most sports focused people, you filled various early career roles – Game Day Supervisor, Training Camp Assistant, Team Services Assistant – how did you eventually figure out Community Relations was your path?







    3: You earned your degree in marketing, and now find yourself in community relations – do you find there to be valuable links between the two fields?







    4: Most people understand what community relations is, but I don’t think they full appreciate the depth of the role – how would you describe the main skill sets necessary to thrive in community relations? 







    5: During your years with the Bucs, you were also the Super Bowl Community Relations rep from 2010- 2016. Every player I’ve interviewed over my career just shakes their head when they talk about the playoffs or super bowl, as if to say “it’s a whole different world”







    Did you feel the same about your super bowl experience, like this just ramped everything up?







    6: What do you remember most about your first Super Bowl event? 







    7: After 14 years with the Bucs and the NFL you jumped to the NHL in a newly developed Director of Community Relations role with ...

    • 49 min
    The Keys to Effective Salary Negotiation – Work In Sports Podcast

    The Keys to Effective Salary Negotiation – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work in Sports podcast!







    Alright, a quick recap of the past few weeks shows -- they’ve been awesome. If you haven’t listened go back and check out:







    * Raleigh Anne Gray, CEO of Must Love Sports and Senior Director of Athlete Exchange for Wasserman* Melissa Silberman, Atlanta hawks Director of Partnership Activation * Ameena Soliman, Player Personnel Coordinator for the  Philadelphia Eagles* Neeta Sreekanth COO of INFLCR







    I just noticed that it’s been ladies’ night on the Work In Sports podcast for the last month-- love that! It wasn’t even intentional!







    Coming up this week is Kevin Brown, Director of Community Relations for the Detroit Red Wings and Director of the Detroit Red Wings Foundation -- super cool guy, I learned a lot about the power of community relations from our conversation. I know you will like it. 







    We’re also getting all of our fall semester sports curriculums up and running -- for those of you who don’t know, we have an online Sports Career Game Plan program with over 120 pages of content, 30+ videos, downloadable worksheets and audio files and more. 















    Our program is being used by Grand Canyon University, University of Florida, Ball State, University of Findlay, Fontbonne University, Dubuque University, and many more. 







    If you are a professor listening, this program is available to you -- it teaches the strategies and tactics to get hired in sports. Period. From the feedback we’ve received from students, it’s life-changing. 







    If you are interested in learning more or seeing a demo -- email me - b clapp at work in sports dot come.







    If you are a student -- push your professor to learn more about our program. Your goal is to get a job after college, and we’ll teach you how. 







    Alright on to today. 







    Before we get into today’s question - I have a request for all of you. I need more podcasts to listen to, personally. 







    Now, here are the rules:







    * I don’t need more sports podcasts, I have plenty of those and I know what I like. * I need more podcasts for when I’m not listening to sports. * I don’t need political podcasts, I have a few I listen to and respect, and I’m well covered there. * I really really like well-produced professional podcasts that tell a story over a 6-10 episode arc. * Examples: Winds of Change, The Clearing, The Catch and Kill podcast..and the granddaddy Serial.* If you have any interview-style shows, like mine but not necessarily related to sports or sports careers, let me know those too...I’m always trying to improve my questioning and techniques. 







    I’m looking for more smart, insightful podcasts so if you have a suggestion that hooked you - please let me know. I’m a content junkie, and I like to learn. 







    Jump over to our private Facebook group, by searching for the Work In Sports podcast on Facebook - answer a few questions so I k...

    • 21 min
    Neeta Sreekanth: INFLCR, Chief Operating Officer – Work In Sports Podcast

    Neeta Sreekanth: INFLCR, Chief Operating Officer – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcasts…







    So think about this for a second -- remove all your preconceived notions - remove everything you’ve been told over the years - clear your mind.







    You are a 19-year old elite college athlete. A basketball star, a softball star, a football star - doesn’t matter, you are elite.  







    I love this dream already - I always wanted to be an elite 19-year old athlete, instead of a well, you know, a decent high school athlete who went on to a successful intramural career.







    Ok, back on track, dream scenario, elite athlete…







    You, the 19 year old elite athlete, start to appear in marketing materials for your university. You are selling tickets. Your jersey, with your name and number on it, is top selling merchandise, generating massive revenue. A video game company, puts your face, your body, your brand on the cover of their game...and sells millions.















    You, the product generating everything, the machine that makes it all go, sees nothing. 







    Meanwhile, you post a video of your most recent training session on youtube -- it generates thousands of views, tons of comments… and by a mistake, you had on the option to include ads, on the video, so it generates some revenue for you.  







    It’s your brand, it’s you. But now you are penalized, threatened with losing your eligibility over generating revenue on yourself and for yourself.







    So everyone else can profit off of you, but you can’t.







    Just to clarify with some real numbers, the NCAA generates over a billion dollars yearly in just media right deals, to broadcast their events, and thee athletes upon who’s back this is generated receive a good old fashioned opportunity to gain an education - not without value, but not exactly equal either. 







    This scenario doesn’t have to be relegated to the elite 1% Zion Williamsons and  Trevor Lawrences who end up on video games -- literally any student-athlete should be able to build a brand and monetize it. They have access, stories, fan bases and if they work to cultivate and grow that reach they should reap the benefits. Period. Full Stop. pont made. Drop the mic.







    Is there nuance to my dream scenario we are overlooking, sure, but stick with the overarching scenario - the big birds eye view is far from equitable.







    Now, it took 50 or so years, but we may finally be reaching a point that makes more sense for everyone. 







    Without getting too litigious -- the NCAA has forbade athletes from profiting off their name, image or likeness (NIL) forever. But California, who knows how to party, signed a law last year saying in our state student athletes can profit off of their NIL -- called the fair pay to play act. 







    Basically telling the NCAA - you don’t hold all the power. 







    While many college coaches and administrators started clutching their pearls, decrying the coming downfall of American civilization if athletes are allowed to, you know, make money, 30 other states passed the Fair Pay to play act -- forcing the NCAA hand. 







    The NCAA backed into a corner said “sure sure sure” we love that idea… we universally agree to allow student athletes to profit off their nams images and likeness in 2021. 







    According to research company MediaKix --   influencer marketing is a 5-10 billion dollar enterprise. 







    Now,

    • 55 min
    Mastering Your Entry Level Resume – Work In Sports Podcast

    Mastering Your Entry Level Resume – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged learning at WorkInSports.com and this is the Work in Sports podcast…







    If you haven’t listened to last week's interview with Ameena Soliman, Player Personnel Coordinator for the Philadelphia Eagles yet, I suggest you do that… right after you listen to this episode. 







    As a long time fan of the show and Florida State Football Recruiting Assistant Jake Kernen remarked to me in our private Facebook group “the interview with Ameena Soliman is some of your best work yet. “







    Now, I’d like to take all the credit, because I’m only humble from time to time, but in all honestly, Ameena made it great because of her answers and approach to the conversation, so go give it a listen.







    Coming up later this week---  is my interview with Neeta Sreekanth, COO of INFLCR, a sports tech company building the brand and monetizing the impact of athletes. With the NCAA approving Names, Images, and Likeness rules going into effect in 2021, student-athletes will be able to profit off of their brand. 















    Neeta and her team at INFLCR are leading the way in marketing, branding and monetizing this potential… and what is really cool is that they are working collectively with the schools and the athletes to follow best practices and make it a win-win for everyone. 







    I like this a lot, I respect it, because rather than saying “let’s grab all the athletes and go crazy!” they are doing this in a responsible manner that still helps the students get exposure but in a responsible manner.







    It’s a great interview - Neeta started out by telling me she likes to spit fire on podcasts… and she did. 







    Tune in for that on Wednesday, and in the coming weeks, I have Kevin brown Director of Community Relations for the Detroit Red Wings and The Detroit Red Wings Foundation. Another incredible conversation… and Shahbaz Khan, Director of Digital Content for the TWolves and Lynx.







    We keep crushing these interviews!







    If you guys and gas listening have specific types of guests you want me ot have on, or recommend a specific person, hit me up. Connect on LinkedIn and let me know!







    Also, if you have a specific sports career-focused question - share it with me and I’ll do a deep dive on the podcast!







    Today’s question comes in from Hannah in Nevada, 







    “Hi Brian, I’m looking to land my first real grown-up job out of college, I know not the greatest time, and I’m struggling with my resume. I have some experience, I have some good grades, I have clubs and stuff -- but I’m having trouble making it show the best version of me! Can you help?”







    Hannah -- I will gladly do so!







    Oh my gosh I just channeled the giant crab Tamatoa in Moana, my kids love that movie... and if you haven’t seen it the always funny Jermaine Clement plays the giant crab and ...why am I going down this tangent?







    Ok, back on track. 







    First things first -- some overarching concepts then we’ll dig in.







    Coordinator, assistant, associate -- searches like that,







    When they say 3-5 years’ experience, they don’t really mean it. They really mean 0-3, but for some reason, employers always say their dreams rather than their expectation. Don’t let that discourage you.







    The expectation is that the entry-level candidates won’t have a ton of exper...

    • 25 min
    Ameena Soliman: Philadelphia Eagles Player Personnel Coordinator – Work In Sports Podcast

    Ameena Soliman: Philadelphia Eagles Player Personnel Coordinator – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…







    I started to read a new book the other day and after about 70 pages I had to put it down. 







    This is abnormal for me, I’m the type of personality that once I start something I have to finish it. I have to know how it ended. 







    This is true for novels, movies, hikes to waterfalls you name it. I have to reach the moment of closure. 







    I could be watching the worst Matthew McConaughey romantic comedy, which is slowly rotting my brain away with each passing line of dialogue (hello Failure to Launch), but I still have to see how it ends. 















    This frustrates my wife, who can cut ties in a moment's notice… but that’s another story. She’s from Philly, she doesn’t suffer fools.  







    Back to the book. 







    I had to put down this book for a very simple reason. And this is a book of great acclaim, an international best seller that was turned into a pretty darn successful movie.







    I put it down because it followed every generalized cliche you could possibly make about races, cultures, religions and creeds.







    The Japanese character was good at math and a whiz on computers.







    The Palenstinian character had been involved in terrorist acts.







    The Russian character was cold, calculating and emotionless.







    The Mexican character worked hard in the fields and then drank beer every night.







    The Jewish character was tight with their money and a shrewd negotiator. 







    Of course, the American character was dashing, intelligent, and fearless -- I'll leave that to your own interpretations. 







    But I didn’t make it much past those characters. This isn’t me being “woke” or pandering to our current culture war,  I just really hate generalizations. I hate cliches, I hate lazy, boring storytelling.   







    Spreading this narrative and reinforcing to people where they should fit, is a dangerous weapon, meant to discourage.







    I’m not having it. I may spark some outrage with this, but I fail to believe we are all pre-determined to fit into categories at birth. We can be whoever we work and are driven to be. 







    Period. 







    Of course, I am oversimplifying, there are systemic obstacles that prevent many of us from becoming exactly who we desire to be, but the over-arching point is simple -- none of us fit into a cliche, we are all individuals.  







    Generalizations like the ones exhibited by this trash book slide their way into our sports world often. 







    I just finished reading an article where the EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER OF THE NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE, Renie Anderson, posted an opinion piece on NFL.com reminding people that “hey, women work in sports too, and there are lots of us in the NFL!”







    Let me repeat that - She is an Executive VP and Chief Revenue Officer in the NFL - which immediately qualifies her as a badass - and she had to write an article telling people that women really do work in sports. In 2020. 







    Let’s break down some more walls, let's get out of this generalized, homogenized world and invite in change, diversity,

    • 42 min
    How to Be The Best Possible Mentor – Work In Sports Podcast

    How to Be The Best Possible Mentor – Work In Sports Podcast

    Hey everybody, I’m Brian Clapp, VP of Content and Engaged Learning for WorkInSports.com and this is the Work In Sports podcast…







    I know I probably say this all the time...but I am on a hot streak lately for great guests.







    Last week Melissa Silberman Director of Partnership Activation for the Atlanta Hawks really brought it. Great info and insight. Later this week, Ameena Soliman Player Personnel Coordinator for the Philadelphia Eagles will blow you away.







    She is so impressive -- focused, measured, direct -- just totally in control, which I loved. 















    Last week I also conducted interviews with Neeta Sreekanth COO of INFLCR - for those of you who follow me on LinkedIn likely saw mee share a photo with Neeta posing with Ken Griffey JR. while being photobombed by Trey Wingo. 







    Here is a professional woman barely across 30 - and she’s already worked in key roles for the Dallas Cowboys and ESPN prior to joining INFLCR -- so cool.







    And Kevin Brown -- Director of Community Relations for the Detroit Red Wings and Director of the Detroit Red Wings foundation -- Kevin is another one, so insightful, so passionate and so driven to make a difference in the world. He uses sports as a way to make a positive change in the community -- it is so inspiring.







    Ameena debuts later this week ---then Neeta...then Kevin… so stay tuned and subscribe to the podcast so you don’t miss a thing.







    Alright today’s question comes in from me. 







    Let me explain. 







    The impact of covid hits us all. 







    Feels weird to hear someone you respect in the industry so much can be let go, like wait, that’s a thing? Makes you fear for yourself a bit…  if they can be removed, who the hell am I? 







    My dad got laid off when I was a kid and I remember feeling like -- wait, that’s possible? He’s superman. 







    Makes you feel vulnerable. 







    But it’s also a chance to give -- I've been connecting my guy with my contacts for the last few days and that feels good, the ability to pay him back for all he’s done for me, even if just in some small way. 







    BUT. the reason I am saying this week question comes from me is because --- it does. 







    The question is “how do you become a strong mentor to others?”







    Everyone has a chance to mentor others, even if you are a college student, you can lead high schoolers and underclassmen. 







    Mentoring makes a difference -- so let’s talk about how this works and then I’m going to give you examples from being mentored by my guy, Steve Becker. 







    1:  There is no set it and forget it process to mentoring...everyone you mentor is different, so everyone needs different things from you. Don’t try to fit the experience into your world, be flexible.







    2: Understand your mentee - what motivates them? what are their goals? what are their roadblocks? How do these things line up with your skills?







    3:  Be vulnerable -- admit mistakes, missteps -- etc there is noting that connects you more with people than resisting the urge to be a know it all.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
199 Ratings

199 Ratings

Eric Cole - Big Train ,

Learning every episode

Already working in the industry I can attest to the value of Brian’s show. It actually goes beyond what those who want to work in sports would expect. Each show is chalked full of wisdom and experience from others in the industry that those looking to break in or those of us already in can learn from. This is my favorite and most valuable podcast by far.

d_salazzar ,

All interns need to subscribe

Everyone needs to subscribe to this podcast to take that next step and further their careers. So many good nuggets you can find on here.

Godspeed25884 ,

The Best Relevant Information for Sport Professionals

I am so thankful for the Work in Sports Podcast. I have been listening for about a year. I have learned so many practical tips and wonderful advice that I have been able to apply to my previous internships and jobs. I now have confidence when I am applying for full time jobs and interviewing. Please listen to the podcast and take notes. So much good information for sport professionals

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