299 episodes

How would you feel about a superhero story that makes Watchmen look like Superfriends? This is a superhero story that kicks Marvel's and DC's asses out of the multiverse. It's fast, emotional, tactical and above all it's consistent. In a world where people get their powers by triggering under extreme stress and/or trauma, the distinction between ''hero'' and ''villain'' is simply a matter of perspective. Widely regarded as ''the Game of Thrones of superhero stories'' Worm is an intense exploration of a world much like our own if a large number of people started getting superpowers starting in the 1980's.



After an exceptionally traumatizing event, Taylor Hebert finds she has the seemingly-mundane ability to control insects. Told primarily from her perspective, Worm follows Taylor as she decides to use these powers for the greater good - no matter what the cost. Her first attempt at taking down a supervillain sees her mistaken for one, thrusting her into the midst of the chaos and complexities of the 'cape' community of Brockton Bay. Cape politics, factions, rivalries, information warfare, and the individual problems of the unbalanced people beneath the costumes puts even the heroes' morality in question. Taylor's actions in the midst of this leave her in a position where she's forced to make some hard choices, facing the reality of having to do the wrong things for the right reasons.



''The only superhero work to show the world as worse because of superheroes''



''X-men has more continent busters, while Worm has more busted continents''



''You know all those times in superhero stories where you wonder why they don't just do *this* or *that* with their power? In this, they *do*''

Worm Audiobook Robert Ramsay

    • Books
    • 4.7 • 71 Ratings

How would you feel about a superhero story that makes Watchmen look like Superfriends? This is a superhero story that kicks Marvel's and DC's asses out of the multiverse. It's fast, emotional, tactical and above all it's consistent. In a world where people get their powers by triggering under extreme stress and/or trauma, the distinction between ''hero'' and ''villain'' is simply a matter of perspective. Widely regarded as ''the Game of Thrones of superhero stories'' Worm is an intense exploration of a world much like our own if a large number of people started getting superpowers starting in the 1980's.



After an exceptionally traumatizing event, Taylor Hebert finds she has the seemingly-mundane ability to control insects. Told primarily from her perspective, Worm follows Taylor as she decides to use these powers for the greater good - no matter what the cost. Her first attempt at taking down a supervillain sees her mistaken for one, thrusting her into the midst of the chaos and complexities of the 'cape' community of Brockton Bay. Cape politics, factions, rivalries, information warfare, and the individual problems of the unbalanced people beneath the costumes puts even the heroes' morality in question. Taylor's actions in the midst of this leave her in a position where she's forced to make some hard choices, facing the reality of having to do the wrong things for the right reasons.



''The only superhero work to show the world as worse because of superheroes''



''X-men has more continent busters, while Worm has more busted continents''



''You know all those times in superhero stories where you wonder why they don't just do *this* or *that* with their power? In this, they *do*''

    Sequel Announcement!

    Sequel Announcement!

    Ward, the sequel to Worm, is being released and has just entered it’s 4th Arc!

    In equally great news: I’ve begun a new audiobook project for this sequel!  I’m handling things a little differently this time so I hope you’ll continue to listen and enjoy!

    You can read Ward at parahumans.net or listen to the audiobook at ParahumanAudio.com

    ~Rein

    • 42 sec
    Interlude: End

    Interlude: End

    Narrator:  Rein

    Original Chapter

    • 53 min
    Teneral E.5

    Teneral E.5

    Narrator: Genesis

    Original Chapter

    • 52 min
    Teneral E.4

    Teneral E.4

    Narrator: the Snickety

    Original Chapter

    • 50 min
    Teneral E.3

    Teneral E.3

    Narrator: Edgar Preen

    Original Chapter

    • 47 min
    Teneral E.2

    Teneral E.2

    Narrator: Chris Batkin

    Original Chapter

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
71 Ratings

71 Ratings

BabrahamLincoln1203 ,

Wonderful!

I heard about this on a suggestions feed for audiobooks on Reddit actually. I had never heard of it before but it was mentioned over and over as the best web serial/audiobook a lot of people had ever read or heard. Podcast format is so readily accessible that I jumped right in to it and I haven’t stopped listening since. I have tried other things but just keep going back to this. I won’t be able to stop until there is no more to listen to.

Saintnew ,

Love the Story

The story is great but the readers sometimes go I. And out in the audio. I’m in Arc 2 and the girl starts reading, she mumbles slightly and doesn’t speak clearly. Other than that, great story!

hoopty woop ,

Excellent story, rough execution

I read this epic in 2013. Hearing it now, seven years later, I’ve come to realize how much better the story is than what I remember. Whether Hindsight, life experience or just plain wisdom- this story has so much depth that I failed to grasp at my younger age.

That being said, it’s becoming more and more apparent as I listen that the narrators (of which there are multiple) have not agreed on the pronunciation of any odd words, cape names or foreign monikers. The narrators fail to pronounce things as obvious as ‘panacea’ and ‘parian’, pronouncing them ‘pan-ees-sia’ and ‘parry-ann’. Some narrators mispronounce the most common words, or misread an entire sentence.

All of this is the work of amateurs that’ve not put enough learning in place in terms of ‘how to produce an audiobook’. They have not agreed on the format of chapter introduction. They have not determined a standard volume of intro and outro music, resulting in wildly varying volumes depending on narrator. The earlier chapter readings-which are of obviously lower quality- have not yet been replaced with something better. Meg, who has a strong (Irish?) accent, pronounced words occasionally such that I need to relisten three times to understand which word she’s trying to say. NSBP (whoever that is) either has a complicated understanding with syllabic pacing or doesn’t understand the words he reads as he reads them. A side chapter (a thirty-six minute read) was read entirely by someone with an exceptionally strong lisp. This same side chapter was written from the perspective of a previously-read-by-someone-else character.

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