13 episodes

Writings of the Saints from the first millennium of Christianity as free audio downloads to aid discovery of what has been believed everywhere, by all, since the time of the apostles, and what the Church did and looked like throughout its history.

Writings of the Church Fathers H. Ian Attila and Ancient Faith Radio

    • Christianity

Writings of the Saints from the first millennium of Christianity as free audio downloads to aid discovery of what has been believed everywhere, by all, since the time of the apostles, and what the Church did and looked like throughout its history.

    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians: Part 3

    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians: Part 3

    [a.d. 30–100.] Clement was probably a Gentile and a Roman. He seems to have been at Philippi with St. Paul (a.d. 57) when that first-born of the Western churches was passing through great trials of faith. There, with holy women and others, he ministered to the apostle and to the saints. As this city was a Roman colony, we need not inquire how a Roman happened to be there. He was possibly in some public service, and it is not improbable that he had visited Corinth in those days. From the apostle, and his companion, St. Luke, he had no doubt learned the use of the Septuagint, in which his knowledge of the Greek tongue soon rendered him an adept. His copy of that version, however, does not always agree with the Received Text, as the reader will perceive. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 97-103). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. The date of this Epistle has been the subject of considerable controversy. It is clear from the writing itself that it was composed soon after some persecution (chap. i.) which the Roman Church had endured; and the only question is, whether we are to fix upon the persecution under Nero or Domitian. If the former, the date will be about the year 68; if the latter, we must place it towards the close of the first century or the beginning of the second. We possess no external aid to the settlement of this question. The lists of early Roman bishops are in hopeless confusion, some making Clement the immediate successor of St. Peter, others placing Linus, and others still Linus and Anacletus, between him and the apostle. The internal evidence, again, leaves the matter doubtful, though it has been strongly pressed on both sides. The probability seems, on the whole, to be in favour of the Domitian period, so that the Epistle may be dated about a.d. 97. This Epistle was held in very great esteem by the early Church. The account given of it by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., iii. 16) is as follows: “There is one acknowledged Epistle of this Clement (whom he has just identified with the friend of St. Paul), great and admirable, which he wrote in the name of the Church of Rome to the Church at Corinth, sedition having then arisen in the latter Church. We are aware that this Epistle has been publicly read in very many churches both in old times, and also in our own day.” The Epistle before us thus appears to have been read in numerous churches, as being almost on a level with the canonical writings. And its place in the Alexandrian ms., immediately after the inspired books, is in harmony with the position thus assigned it in the primitive Church. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 141-153). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. St. Clement is commemorated on November 25th.

    • 10 min
    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians: Part 2

    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians: Part 2

    [a.d. 30–100.] Clement was probably a Gentile and a Roman. He seems to have been at Philippi with St. Paul (a.d. 57) when that first-born of the Western churches was passing through great trials of faith. There, with holy women and others, he ministered to the apostle and to the saints. As this city was a Roman colony, we need not inquire how a Roman happened to be there. He was possibly in some public service, and it is not improbable that he had visited Corinth in those days. From the apostle, and his companion, St. Luke, he had no doubt learned the use of the Septuagint, in which his knowledge of the Greek tongue soon rendered him an adept. His copy of that version, however, does not always agree with the Received Text, as the reader will perceive. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 97-103). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. The date of this Epistle has been the subject of considerable controversy. It is clear from the writing itself that it was composed soon after some persecution (chap. i.) which the Roman Church had endured; and the only question is, whether we are to fix upon the persecution under Nero or Domitian. If the former, the date will be about the year 68; if the latter, we must place it towards the close of the first century or the beginning of the second. We possess no external aid to the settlement of this question. The lists of early Roman bishops are in hopeless confusion, some making Clement the immediate successor of St. Peter, others placing Linus, and others still Linus and Anacletus, between him and the apostle. The internal evidence, again, leaves the matter doubtful, though it has been strongly pressed on both sides. The probability seems, on the whole, to be in favour of the Domitian period, so that the Epistle may be dated about a.d. 97. This Epistle was held in very great esteem by the early Church. The account given of it by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., iii. 16) is as follows: “There is one acknowledged Epistle of this Clement (whom he has just identified with the friend of St. Paul), great and admirable, which he wrote in the name of the Church of Rome to the Church at Corinth, sedition having then arisen in the latter Church. We are aware that this Epistle has been publicly read in very many churches both in old times, and also in our own day.” The Epistle before us thus appears to have been read in numerous churches, as being almost on a level with the canonical writings. And its place in the Alexandrian ms., immediately after the inspired books, is in harmony with the position thus assigned it in the primitive Church. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 141-153). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. St. Clement is commemorated on November 25th.

    • 14 min
    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians

    First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians

    [a.d. 30–100.] Clement was probably a Gentile and a Roman. He seems to have been at Philippi with St. Paul (a.d. 57) when that first-born of the Western churches was passing through great trials of faith. There, with holy women and others, he ministered to the apostle and to the saints. As this city was a Roman colony, we need not inquire how a Roman happened to be there. He was possibly in some public service, and it is not improbable that he had visited Corinth in those days. From the apostle, and his companion, St. Luke, he had no doubt learned the use of the Septuagint, in which his knowledge of the Greek tongue soon rendered him an adept. His copy of that version, however, does not always agree with the Received Text, as the reader will perceive. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 97-103). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. The date of this Epistle has been the subject of considerable controversy. It is clear from the writing itself that it was composed soon after some persecution (chap. i.) which the Roman Church had endured; and the only question is, whether we are to fix upon the persecution under Nero or Domitian. If the former, the date will be about the year 68; if the latter, we must place it towards the close of the first century or the beginning of the second. We possess no external aid to the settlement of this question. The lists of early Roman bishops are in hopeless confusion, some making Clement the immediate successor of St. Peter, others placing Linus, and others still Linus and Anacletus, between him and the apostle. The internal evidence, again, leaves the matter doubtful, though it has been strongly pressed on both sides. The probability seems, on the whole, to be in favour of the Domitian period, so that the Epistle may be dated about a.d. 97. This Epistle was held in very great esteem by the early Church. The account given of it by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., iii. 16) is as follows: “There is one acknowledged Epistle of this Clement (whom he has just identified with the friend of St. Paul), great and admirable, which he wrote in the name of the Church of Rome to the Church at Corinth, sedition having then arisen in the latter Church. We are aware that this Epistle has been publicly read in very many churches both in old times, and also in our own day.” The Epistle before us thus appears to have been read in numerous churches, as being almost on a level with the canonical writings. And its place in the Alexandrian ms., immediately after the inspired books, is in harmony with the position thus assigned it in the primitive Church. Schaff, Philip. Ante-Nicene Fathers Volume 1 - Enhanced Version (Early Church Fathers) (Kindle Locations 141-153). Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Kindle Edition. St. Clement is commemorated on November 25th.

    • 33 min
    The Didache

    The Didache

    “Granting the general authenticity of the Greek work, the time of composition must be at least as early as the first half of the second century. If the Teaching is older than Barnabas, then it cannot be later than A.D. 120. If both are from a common source, the interval of time was probably not very great. The document itself bears many marks of an early date…” (Anti-Nicene Fathers, Vol 7. pp. 374-375). St. Athanasius the Great (d. 373) seems to have recommended this work in his 39th Easter Epistle : “But for greater exactness I add this also, writing of necessity; that there are other books besides these not indeed included in the Canon, but appointed by the Fathers to be read by those who newly join us, and who wish for instruction in the word of godliness. The Wisdom of Solomon, and the Wisdom of Sirach, and Esther, and Judith, and Tobit, and that which is called the Teaching of Apostles, and the Shepherd.” (Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, 2nd Series, Vol. 4, p. 552, italics added)

    • 22 min
    The Epistle of Barnabas: Part 5

    The Epistle of Barnabas: Part 5

    “Though the letter really is anonymous, its traditional title connects it with the famous name of the one-time companion of the apostle Paul. Could it actually have been written by that Barnabas? Or was the author some other man named Barnabas? Or did the name get attached for some other reason? We do not know, but by the year 200, Clement of Alexandria had attributed it to Paul’s companion. What we do know is that the Letter of Barnabas was widely read in the church during the second and third centuries. Clement, who lived in Alexandria from about 180 to 203, quoted Barnabas as ‘Scripture’….[W]hen Athanasius gave his list of (1) canonical Scripture and (2) other books ‘read’ in the fourth-century Alexandria, Barnabas appeared in neither list. Eusebius, the church historian of the same period, was dubious about its canonical claim, and Jerome in the same century called it apocryphal. Nevertheless a fourth-century Greek manuscript of the Scriptures places it right after Johns Revelation.” Jack N. Sparks ed., The Apostolic Fathers (Thomas Nelson, 1978), 263-264.

    • 9 min
    The Epistle of Barnabas: Part 4

    The Epistle of Barnabas: Part 4

    “Though the letter really is anonymous, its traditional title connects it with the famous name of the one-time companion of the apostle Paul. Could it actually have been written by that Barnabas? Or was the author some other man named Barnabas? Or did the name get attached for some other reason? We do not know, but by the year 200, Clement of Alexandria had attributed it to Paul’s companion. What we do know is that the Letter of Barnabas was widely read in the church during the second and third centuries. Clement, who lived in Alexandria from about 180 to 203, quoted Barnabas as ‘Scripture’….[W]hen Athanasius gave his list of (1) canonical Scripture and (2) other books ‘read’ in the fourth-century Alexandria, Barnabas appeared in neither list. Eusebius, the church historian of the same period, was dubious about its canonical claim, and Jerome in the same century called it apocryphal. Nevertheless a fourth-century Greek manuscript of the Scriptures places it right after Johns Revelation.” Jack N. Sparks ed., The Apostolic Fathers (Thomas Nelson, 1978), 263-264.

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

Ana Zogbi ,

Amazing Podcast

I love this podcast! For those who are interested in the writings of the Fathers, don’t think twice, subscribed because it’s so profound and beautiful
Please keep this amazing apostolic work

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Thanks

Thank you for making this available for us. It makes sense that the people who were closest to the apostle would have the best perspective on what they taught considering they spoke the languange and was able to speak face to face with them or someone who knew them.

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