50 episodes

Discover what comes next with this in-depth look at how science and technology are revolutionizing the way we live, work and play. Join our award-winning team of journalists as we crisscross the country to interview the leaders and luminaries reshaping our world.

WSJ’s The Future of Everything The Wall Street Journal

    • Technology
    • 4.3 • 1.1K Ratings

Discover what comes next with this in-depth look at how science and technology are revolutionizing the way we live, work and play. Join our award-winning team of journalists as we crisscross the country to interview the leaders and luminaries reshaping our world.

    Teacher's New Assistant: Artificial Intelligence

    Teacher's New Assistant: Artificial Intelligence

    Schools around the world are slowly adopting artificial intelligence to better tailor teaching to individual kids. One program maps a student's mastery of math; another assesses literacy and screens for dyslexia. Critics are skeptical that this technology is as effective as promised. Could surveilling students in this way do more harm than good?

    • 30 min
    Mobile Voting's Future

    Mobile Voting's Future

    As the U.S. gets ready for an election during a pandemic, we report on in-person voting options and review the security threats inherent in mobile or blockchain assisted voting. In a previous version of this podcast released on Oct. 2, we said that Bradley Tusk was funding mobile voting apps, including the Voatz app. Tusk Philanthropies has given funding to voting precincts to launch mobile voting pilot programs - not to the apps themselves.

    • 26 min
    The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

    The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

    The coronavirus pandemic led to blood-donation shortages across the world, outlining the fragility of the pipeline. That has brought fresh urgency to research that has been decades in the making but is only now starting to become a reality: The production of artificial blood. Last year, researchers began a pioneering clinical trial, and more are on the way, bringing us closer to a world where blood factories augment supplies.

    • 27 min
    How to Talk to Animals (and Know What They're Saying Back)

    How to Talk to Animals (and Know What They're Saying Back)

    What if we could alert whales to stay away from oil spills? Or hear from dolphins directly when they want treats? Seamless conversation between animals and humans is still a far-off goal. But scientists think that machine-learning tools could open the door to communication with marine mammals. Listen to the first part of this two-part series, Google AI Tries to Save the Whales.

    • 28 min
    Google AI Tries to Save the Whales

    Google AI Tries to Save the Whales

    In the Pacific Northwest, an increase in shipping traffic is further threatening the orca population, which has already seen its numbers drop in the face of food shortages and climate change. One of the biggest threats from the boats is noise pollution, which interferes with the whales' ability to communicate. Engineers at a unit of Google may have an answer: An alert system that relies on artificial intelligence.

    • 32 min
    Traveling With Tech Made for the World's Fastest Sailboats

    Traveling With Tech Made for the World's Fastest Sailboats

    The America's Cup, the world's oldest sailing competition, has a reputation for fostering innovation. In 2013, contestants began to use hydrofoils-underwater wings on the hull-to lift their boats out of the water during the race, allowing them to reach highway speeds and revolutionizing the sport. An Olympic sailor and a billionaire oil trader are now reimagining the technology to make passenger ferries faster and more eco-friendly.

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

Btm000000 ,

Amazing in beginning

Used to be amazing and I couldn’t get enough of it. Now it’s a bit boring, too many recordings from conferences, and I liked the original host Jennifer Strong SO much better

statedept1515 ,

Cool idea but

It’s obvious when people care about their podcasts and with this it’s just not there. I get that it’s pretty research heavy, but monthly podcasts are tough to build a listener base.

t.swiezy ,

Pushing an agenda

The episode on police training lost me. Implicit bias is a sham. The result of experiments are not repeatable and don’t hold up to scientific scrutiny. Why is it presented as gospel truth here? There are legitimate concerns about its efficacy and it was presented as an unimpeachable scientific finding along with the implication that there’s a significant proportion of the population who it is making racist and therefore marginalizes a portion of society. This is a despicable and ideologically driven effort to rebrand the Marxist idea of false consciousness and foist it on all society. The Wall Street Journal should be ashamed of itself for this poor quality “reporting” or “content” or “narrative” or whatever you want to call it. Shameful display and it made me question what else I’ve missed in past episodes that I’m not as knowledgeable on to know where I’m being presented ideology instead of reality.

To be a bit more concrete in my criticism, the episode spoke on a program that has people play as a black person throughout their life and then talks about how the result of that was having peoples’ minds changed about race and justice, but there is an immense amount of special pleading involved here considering the life story is a narrative written by someone, who by their statements in the episode, it can be assumed has a specific idea of race in America which is taken as reflective of reality when it may not be. That’s special pleading. They’re making the argument contingent on the depiction of reality they present despite there being ample evidence that their depiction is flawed that they choose to ignore. Once again, this is a shameful display by the WSJ and is reflective of how our journalistic class has fallen. Be better.

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