50 episodes

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

WSJ’s The Future of Everything The Wall Street Journal

    • Technology
    • 4.3 • 1.2K Ratings

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

    Thanksgiving of the Future: What Climate Change Means for Your Plate

    Thanksgiving of the Future: What Climate Change Means for Your Plate

    Thanksgiving often centers around a meal: turkey, sides and a lot of desserts. This year, many Thanksgiving staples are more expensive due to inflation; in the future, many of those staples will cost even more due to the effects of climate change. WSJ’s Alex Ossola looks into how environmental conditions, alongside technological advances, will change what makes its way to our Thanksgiving tables, and how our individual choices may spark new traditions. 



    Further reading: 

    The Trouble With Butter: Tight Dairy Supplies Send Prices Surging Ahead of Baking Season 

    Record Turkey Prices Are Coming for Thanksgiving 

    Lab-Grown Poultry Clears First Hurdle at FDA 

    Sean Sherman’s 2018 op-ed in Time 

    The Essential Thanksgiving Playbook 

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    • 21 min
    The Problem With Plastics: Could New Recycling Tech Help the Planet?

    The Problem With Plastics: Could New Recycling Tech Help the Planet?

    World leaders are still trying to figure out how to handle the hundreds of millions of tons of plastic waste generated every year. Back in the 1990s, it was tough to switch on the TV and not see ads or shows offering viewers a simple solution: to reduce, reuse, and recycle plastics. Nice words, but it turns out that wasn’t enough to solve the problem. New high tech methods have shown promise in breaking down plastics or creating new ones that are easier to recycle. But they’re expensive alternatives. Will the economics work out? WSJ’s Danny Lewis sorts through the future of plastics recycling.



    Would you pay more for plastic products designed to be easily recycled? Email us at foepodcast@wsj.com 



    Further reading: 

    U.S. Recycles 5% of Plastic Waste, Studies Show 

    The 100% Recyclable Running Shoe That’s Only Available by Subscription 

    ‘Widely Recyclable’ Label Introduced to Plastic Packaging 

    Soda Brands Are About to Get Possessive of Their Trash 

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    • 21 min
    Siddhartha Mukherjee on the Future of Cellular Medicine

    Siddhartha Mukherjee on the Future of Cellular Medicine

    Cells are the basic unit of life, but you could be forgiven if you stopped thinking about them after high school biology. In his newest book, “The Song of the Cell,” physician and author Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee explores the myriad ways the humble cell is key to our world and our biology. He speaks to WSJ’s Alex Ossola about how our understanding of the cell is opening up a new frontier in medicine, how it is helping create new treatments for difficult diseases like cancer, and how it could one day help fix or even enhance our bodies. 



    What’s something you’re curious about that could shape the future? Email us at foepodcast@wsj.com   



    Further reading: 

    Book Review: The Emperor of All Maladies 

    Peeking Into Pandora’s Box 

    Publisher Tweaks ‘Gene’ Book After New Yorker Article Uproar 

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    • 25 min
    Are Personal Pigs The Future of Human Medicine?

    Are Personal Pigs The Future of Human Medicine?

    In the future, you might leave your doctor’s office with a prescription for a pig whose DNA has been modified to match your own. Scientists are already working on genetically engineering pigs to help predict the progression of a disease, or serve as an organ donor for those who need a transplant. But could pigs one day become keys to truly personalized medicine? WSJ’s Danny Lewis explores the promise and potential pitfalls of using animals to help human health.



    What’s something you’re curious about that could shape the future? Email us at foepodcast@wsj.com 



    Further reading:

    Growing a New Type of Organ Donor 

    Scientists to Study Pig-Organ Transplants in Brain-Dead People for Longer Periods  

    Scientists Transplant Human Tissue into Rat Brains, Opening Door to New Research 

    The Human Genome “Rosetta Stone” and The Future of Health 

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    • 21 min
    Beyond Silicon? The New Materials Charting the Future of Microchips

    Beyond Silicon? The New Materials Charting the Future of Microchips

    Microchips are in pretty much all of our electronic devices—if it’s got a plug or a battery, it’s probably got a chip. For the past 60 years, most of these have been made of silicon. But new devices demand faster, better, and more efficient processors, and engineers are hitting silicon’s physical limits. In this episode of the Future of Everything, WSJ’s Alex Ossola digs into the future of chips—how scientists are boosting silicon’s capabilities and looking for other materials that could take its place.



    Further reading: 

    Graphene and Beyond: The Wonder Materials That Could Replace Silicon in Future Tech 

    The Microchip Era Is Giving Way to the Megachip Age 

    Chips Act Will Create More Than One Million Jobs, Biden Says Timeline of silicon’s development (Computer History Museum) 

    Christopher Mims’ tech column for the Wall Street Journal 

    Deji Akinwande's research page at the University of Texas at Austin 

    Stephen Forrest's profile page at the University of Michigan 

    Deep Jariwala's lab page the the University of Pennsylvania Wolfspeed's website 

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    • 21 min
    The Conservation Conundrum: How Do We Decide Which Species to Save?

    The Conservation Conundrum: How Do We Decide Which Species to Save?

    From “save the whales” to “protect the bumblebee,” animal conservationists rally advocates and officials to put resources toward ensuring the survival of a threatened species. But can we really save them all? Or are we overlooking the trade-offs as we decide which animals are protected to the detriment of others? WSJ’s Danny Lewis speaks to Dr. Rebecca Nesbit, ecologist and author of the book “Tickets for The Ark: From Wasps to Whales – How Do We Choose What to Save?” about the tricky ethical questions behind conservation.

     

    Further Reading:



    A Belgian City Opens a Hotel for an Unusual Clientele: Insects | WSJ 

    Are Shark Attacks a Sign of Conservation Success? | WSJ 

    Bird Populations Plummet in North America | WSJ 

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    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

groovecanon ,

Great Podcast

Wonderfully produced. Great topics. High fiving a million angels 🙌

littlest cowboy ,

This pod used to be good

Your guest on bio whatever didn’t even know how to explain what she’s doing. Bunch of gobblety goop

Marcus517 ,

What happened to the WSJ

This has to be a separate group from WSJ. Both light weight and biased.

The recent Rosetta Stone article talked about how the recent decoding of the entire human genome (filling in the 8% that was missing) was groundbreaking and would change our understanding of diseases. However, the only evidence was essentially the person who did the work saying it was groundbreaking and would change our .... If "felt" like Dr Eichler and his team did a lot of hard work over something that didn't matter all that much and was deparate to make it sound important. Just give me some facts next time and you'll have me.

The recent "As we work" episode was embarassing. All about the unfairness of the wage gap to women, minorities, etc. Zero from the studies which showed where, in large part, this comes from. At least for women, it's that they choose or are forced in some way to take the less intense job. So, take the town lawyer job at 30 hours per week vs. the corporate 60 hour a week one. You can argue against what I said, but at least mention that this data is out there. And the host must know about this, or is incompetent.

The last thing we need is another NPR podcast. I'm done.

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