8 episodes

Using the expertise at West Virginia University, we seek to answer questions about coronavirus (COVID-19): What is it? How can I stay safe? We'll also learn more about viruses and how they work, as well as how West Virginia and the University are responding to the global pandemic that has caused the world to go into lockdown.

WVU and the Coronavirus WVU University Relations

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

Using the expertise at West Virginia University, we seek to answer questions about coronavirus (COVID-19): What is it? How can I stay safe? We'll also learn more about viruses and how they work, as well as how West Virginia and the University are responding to the global pandemic that has caused the world to go into lockdown.

    How do you handle an epidemic as it's unfolding?

    How do you handle an epidemic as it's unfolding?

    How do you handle an epidemic unfolding on-the-ground, and how do you handle cultural and language barriers? How do you know when an epidemic starts to wind down?
    In the eighth episode of "WVU and the Coronavirus," we talk to Dr. Diane Gross. She’s an adjunct professor of Epidemiology and Public Health Practice at West Virginia University’s School of Public Health.
    The episode is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts. A transcript is available on the show page.
    Dr. Gross was on-the-ground in 2015 in Sierra Leone during the Ebola outbreak. She’s also served as a senior epidemiologist in the High Threat Pathogens unit for the World Health Organization (WHO), and currently works with the Monongalia County Health Department’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    In this interview-driven series, “WVU and the Coronavirus” will examine what we already know about COVID-19, find out the latest information about the virus, explore how RNA viruses like coronaviruses work, and learn how the University community has responded to the global pandemic.
    Written by Stacey Elza, Wendy Holdren and David Ryan. Narrated by David Ryan. Sound mixed by Sean Hines.
    For more information or to listen now, visit the “WVU and the Coronavirus” show page.

    • 34 min
    Keeping up with your care is important

    Keeping up with your care is important

    The new coronavirus disrupted a lot in our lives. But it shouldn't disrupt how we all approach our routine healthcare and wellness visits.
    In the seventh episode of "WVU and the Coronavirus," we welcome back Dr. Lisa Costello, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the West Virginia University School of Medicine and the president of the West Virginia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    Dr. Costello discusses some of the unanticipated health consequences of living during a global pandemic — not only for children, but for adults and those with special health considerations.

    In this interview-driven series, “WVU and the Coronavirus” will examine what we already know about COVID-19, find out the latest information about the virus, explore how RNA viruses like coronaviruses work, and learn how the University community has responded to the global pandemic.
    Written by Stacey Elza, Wendy Holdren and David Ryan. Narrated by David Ryan. Sound mixed by Sean Hines.
    For more information, visit the “WVU and the Coronavirus” show page. 
    Additionally, find COVID-19 resources with general information and specific details related to populations such as students, faculty and staff, researchers, healthcare providers or the general public. Other resources, including a quick reference fact sheet, videos, social media graphics, field experts, media contact information and more are also available.
    Visit coronavirus.wvu.edu/media-resources and the WVUToday Media Center.
    Produced by University Relations at West Virginia University.

    • 30 min
    COVID-19 In Black and Minority Communities

    COVID-19 In Black and Minority Communities

    In this week’s episode of the “WVU and the Coronavirus” podcast, we talk to Spenser Darden, the director of Diversity Initiatives and Community Engagement at WVU. In the episode, Darden explains how COVID-19 has further shown the gap in access to care in black communities, and how those gaps came to be.      

    • 33 min
    Spillover Events - How can a bat infect a human?

    Spillover Events - How can a bat infect a human?

    How exactly did a virus from a bat jump to humans?
    In this week’s episode of the “WVU and the Coronavirus” podcast, Dr. Rita Rio, biology professor in the West Virginia University Eberly College of Arts & Sciences, talks about “spillover events,” and explains how a coronavirus from a bat could make the leap to cause a global pandemic.
    In this interview-driven series, “WVU and the Coronavirus” will examine what we already know about COVID-19, find out the latest information about the virus, explore how RNA viruses like coronaviruses work, and learn how the University community has responded to the global pandemic.
    Written by Stacey Elza, Wendy Holdren and David Ryan. Narrated by David Ryan. Sound mixed by Sean Hines.
    For more information, visit the “WVU and the Coronavirus” show page. 
    Additionally, find COVID-19 resources with general information and specific details related to populations such as students, faculty and staff, researchers, healthcare providers or the general public. Other resources, including a quick reference fact sheet, videos, social media graphics, field experts, media contact information and more are also available.
    Visit coronavirus.wvu.edu/media-resources and the WVUToday Media Center.
    Produced by University Relations at West Virginia University.

    • 16 min
    10,000 Masks For Healthcare Heroes

    10,000 Masks For Healthcare Heroes

    In our fourth episode, we talk to Elizabeth Shorrock, a visiting assistant professor of Fashion, Dress & Merchandising at the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design. She launched an effort in March to create masks for healthcare providers and others in need. 

    She shares how the idea was generated, how she and a group of students worked during the pandemic, and how gratifying the experience has been. 
    In this interview-driven series, “WVU and the Coronavirus” will examine what we already know about COVID-19, find out the latest information about the virus, explore how RNA viruses like coronaviruses work, and learn how the University community has responded to the global pandemic.
    Written by Stacey Elza, Wendy Holdren and David Ryan. Narrated by David Ryan. Sound mixed by Sean Hines.
    For more information, visit the “WVU and the Coronavirus” show page. 
    Additionally, find COVID-19 resources with general information and specific details related to populations such as students, faculty and staff, researchers, healthcare providers or the general public. Other resources, including a quick reference fact sheet, videos, social media graphics, field experts, media contact information and more are also available.
    Visit coronavirus.wvu.edu/media-resources and the WVUToday Media Center.
    Produced by University Relations at West Virginia University.

    • 13 min
    Closing and reopening: How West Virginia continues to respond to COVID-19

    Closing and reopening: How West Virginia continues to respond to COVID-19

    In our third episode, we talk to Dr. Clay Marsh, vice president and executive dean for WVU Health Sciences. Dr. Marsh serves as West Virginia's COVID-19 czar, and has been part of the state's response team to the coronavirus.

    • 22 min

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