19 episodes

All of America's top ten talk shows are hosted by millionaires and billionaires! This is not one of them. You Talk It. We Live It. is a talk show about, by and for working people. Hosted by three women who know the every day realities of struggling to keep food on the table, pay the bills, educate their families while supporting friends and community. This show will bring you unfiltered perspectives of the issues confronting the working class.

You Talk It. We Live It‪.‬ You Talk It. We Live It.

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

All of America's top ten talk shows are hosted by millionaires and billionaires! This is not one of them. You Talk It. We Live It. is a talk show about, by and for working people. Hosted by three women who know the every day realities of struggling to keep food on the table, pay the bills, educate their families while supporting friends and community. This show will bring you unfiltered perspectives of the issues confronting the working class.

    Should the federal gov't raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and expand Section 8?

    Should the federal gov't raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and expand Section 8?

    In the first episode of Season 4 of YTWL hosts River Scholl and Ellen Quale are joined by guest host Maria Picar to discuss the campaign to raise the federal minimum wage and the positives and negatives of expanding America's biggest rental assistance program — Section 8.

    Below are some of the pros and cons for raising the federal minimum wage:

    Pros:
    Raising the minimum wage would increase economic activity and spur job growth.
    The Economic Policy Institute stated that a minimum wage increase from the current rate of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 would inject $22.1 billion net into the economy and create about 85,000 new jobs over a three-year phase-in period.

    Increasing the minimum wage would reduce poverty.
    According to a 2014 Congressional Budget Office report, increasing the minimum wage to $9 would lift 300,000 people out of poverty, and an increase to $10.10 would lift 900,000 people out of poverty.

    A higher minimum wage would reduce government welfare spending.
    If low-income workers earned more money, their dependence on, and eligibility for, government benefits would decrease. The Center for American Progress reported in 2014 that raising the federal minimum wage by 6% to $10.10 would reduce spending on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) by 6% or $4.6 billion.

    Cons:
    Increasing the minimum wage would force businesses to lay off employees and raise unemployment levels.
    The Congressional Budget Office projected that a minimum wage increase from $7.25 to $10.10 would result in a loss of 500,000 jobs. [5] In a survey of 1,213 businesses and human resources professionals, 38% of employers who currently pay minimum wage said they would lay off some employees if the minimum wage was raised to $10.10. 54% said they would decrease hiring levels.

    Raising the minimum wage would increase poverty.
    A study from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland found that although low-income workers see wage increases when the minimum wage is raised, “their hours and employment decline, and the combined effect of these changes is a decline in earned income… minimum wages increase the proportion of families that are poor or near-poor.” [47] As explained by George Reisman, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Pepperdine University, “The higher wages are, the higher costs of production are. The higher costs of production are, the higher prices are. The higher prices are, the smaller the quantities of goods and services demanded and the number of workers employed in producing them."

    A minimum wage increase would hurt businesses and force companies to close.
    60% of small-business owners say that raising the minimum wage will “hurt most small-business owners,” according to a 2013 Gallup poll.

    Source ProCon.org

    • 1 hr 16 min
    COVID -19: Perspectives on India #19

    COVID -19: Perspectives on India #19

    In this two part episode of YTWL host River Scholl, speaks with Gandhi Scholar Michael Sonnleitner about his 2020 trip to India and the Indian's government's response to COVID -19.

    This time last year, theories about India’s astonishingly low rates of COVID-19 infection included hot weather, natural immunity and the country’s high proportion of young people; some also attributed it to the country’s harsh lockdown. India was doing so well that in megacities like Mumbai and Delhi, officials had begun dismantling temporary COVID-19 facilities.

    Fast-forward to now, April 2021, and cases and deaths are soaring, leaving hospitals running out of oxygen. The shortage of beds and space is so acute that people are dying in car parks waiting to be admitted. Daily rates are currently over 300,000, the world’s highest-ever daily infection rate. - gavi.org
     

    • 50 min
    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Musician Hauk Heimdallsman #18

    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Musician Hauk Heimdallsman #18

    COVID-19 has brought the entertainment industry to its knees and artists of all stripes are struggling  just like the rest of us . Join us for our series An Artist's Tale as we talk to creatives of every stripe about their lives and work during the pandemic.

    Hauk has a tradition for defying convention and limitation. His songs are too country for metal, too heavy for country, too punk for folk, too folk for punk, and always in your face. Hauk has released 10 solo albums, two albums with Black Hat Society, an album with The Pirates Charles. He has also produced bands like No Convention, Margot Lane and the Greybirds, Post Relic, and more. He has also scored two feature films and many short films
    including the award winning “Pirate Captain Toledano.”

    Join our hosts River Scholl and Emily Metcalfe as they talk with Hauk in a wide ranging interview about his experiences as an artist during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

    And some disclaimer stuff: 
    No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. 
    Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.

    • 20 min
    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Director and Voice Actor Sommer Martin #17

    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Director and Voice Actor Sommer Martin #17

    Sommer Martin is a filmmaker and voice actor based in Portland, Oregon.  Her favorite genre to write is horror and with a background in fundraising, communications and theatre Martin will be launching her own production company specializing in hiring BIPoc crew and talent later this year.  

    Join our hosts River Scholl and Ellen Quale as they talk with Martin in a wide ranging interview about her experiences as a woman of color in the movie industry. 

    And some disclaimer stuff: 
    No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. 
    Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.

    • 30 min
    COVID -19: Transit Workers — How are our transit workers faring during the pandemic? #16

    COVID -19: Transit Workers — How are our transit workers faring during the pandemic? #16

    You Talk It. We Live It host Ellen Quale talks with Amalgamated Transit Union 757 (ATU 757)  President Shirley Block about the ATU's work during the pandemic and their fight for fair pay and benefits, a safe, secure working environment and democracy in the workplace.

    ATU 757 organizes public transit workers in Oregon and Southern Washington.

    Here are 5 interesting facts about unions:
    Union members earn better wages and benefits than workers who aren’t union members. On average, union workers’ wages are 19% higher than their nonunion counterparts.More than 75% of union workers have jobs that provide health insurance benefits, but less than half of nonunion workers do.Unions help bring more working people into the middle class. In fact, in states where people don’t have union rights, workers’ incomes are lower.Working people in a union are five times more likely to participate in an employer-provided pension plan than working people without a union.Unions help employers create a more stable, productive workforce—where workers have a say in improving their jobs.Source AFL-CIO

    And some disclaimer stuff: 
    No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. 
    Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.

    • 28 min
    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Musician and Artist Dulcie Taylor #15

    An Artist's Tale: A Conversation with Musician and Artist Dulcie Taylor #15

    COVID-19 has brought the entertainment industry to its knees and artists of all stripes are struggling  just like the rest of us but really how are they doing? What is life like now for the working musician?   

    Join our hosts Ellen Quale,  Emily Metcalfe and River Scholl as they talk with artist and musician Dulcie Taylor about the trials of creating during a pandemic.

    Dulcie learned a hard music lesson at an early age – don’t leave your ukulele unattended in a porch chair at the beach. Some clueless teenager can sit on it and smash it to bits.

    The demise of her ukulele was a tough moment for ten-year-old Dulcie but that Christmas her Mother bought her a guitar and Taylor’s lifelong love of singing and songwriting began. In hindsight, a grown-up Taylor sees the smashed ukulele as something of a blessing in disguise…after all, she has shared the stage with a long and impressive list of artists, including Jerry Lee Lewis, Asleep at the Wheel, Guy Clark, John Gorka, and Kathy Mattea. - source dulcietaylor.com

    And some disclaimer stuff: 
    No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. 
    Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.

    • 28 min

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