113 episodes

The Neurodiversity Podcast talks with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, about positively impacting neurodivergent people. Our goal is to reframe differences that were once considered disabilities or disorders, promote awareness of this unique population, and improve the lives of neurodivergent and high-ability people.

Neurodiversity Podcast Emily Kircher-Morris

    • Health & Fitness

The Neurodiversity Podcast talks with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, about positively impacting neurodivergent people. Our goal is to reframe differences that were once considered disabilities or disorders, promote awareness of this unique population, and improve the lives of neurodivergent and high-ability people.

    Technology: Keeping Kids Safe from the Digital Dark Side

    Technology: Keeping Kids Safe from the Digital Dark Side

    Technology use, for both kids and adults, is in uncharted territory. With ‘sticky’ algorithms, misleading information, and the tracking capabilities of technology companies, it’s becoming more and more difficult to know where it’s safe to go, and how much exposure is too much. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Dr. Alex Packer, author of Slaying Digital Dragons, about how to navigate the murky waters of the digital dark side, and how to involve your kids in setting their own healthy limits. ABOUT THE GUEST - Alex J. Packer, Ph.D., is an educator and psychologist. A recognized expert on adolescent development, parenting, and substance abuse prevention, Alex served for 14 years as President and CEO of FCD Educational Services, the leading nonprofit provider of onsite K-12 drug education and substance abuse prevention services for schools throughout the United States and in over 60 countries abroad.
    Alex is the author of 11 books for parents, counselors, teachers, and teenagers, including Slaying Digital Dragons: Tips and Tools for Protecting Your Body, Brain, Psyche, and Thumbs from the Digital Dark Side, and How Rude!: The Teen Guide to Good Manners, Proper Behavior, and Not Grossing People Out. Alex graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy. He received undergraduate and Master’s degrees from Harvard University and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in Educational and Developmental Psychology from Boston College. He served as headmaster of Parkmont School in Washington, D.C., and was the Director of Education for the Capital Children’s Museum.
    You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com

    • 34 min
    What’s So Normal About Normal?

    What’s So Normal About Normal?

    Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Jonathan Mooney, who authored a book called Normal Sucks, and who learned to read at the age of 12. They talk about the gap between normal and neurodivergence, and how advocates can help bridge it effectively and permanently. Who can advocate? How does the life experience of neurodivergent people affect how they parent their own kids? How does the deficit-model approach differ from strengths-based? What is the effect of lack of support on mental health?
    ABOUT THE GUEST - Jonathan Mooney is a neurodiverse author and advocate who did not learn to read until he was 12 years old. He went on to graduate from Brown University and is the co-founder of Eye To Eye, a non-profit advocacy organization for people with learning and attention differences. He is also the author of three books, most recently Normal Sucks.
    His work has been featured in the New York Times, LA Times, on ABC News, and National Public Radio, to name a few. Mr. Mooney speaks across the nation about neurological and physical diversity, inspiring those who live with differences, and advocating for change.
    You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com

    • 31 min
    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Pathological Demand Avoidance (from episode 85)

    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Pathological Demand Avoidance (from episode 85)

    The language around autism and neurodiversity in general is changing. As part of the review of 2021’s biggest conversations we present a chat with Kristy Forbes, founder of Australia-based inTune Pathways, about PDA (Pathological Demand Avoidance), the difference between PDA and other types of demand avoidance, and the changing language of autism, especially the terminology society uses to describe neurodivergent people. You can learn more about Kristy and PDA on the episode 85 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.

    • 42 min
    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Helping Kids With Anxiety (from episode 88)

    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Helping Kids With Anxiety (from episode 88)

    Parents often struggle with helping their children manage anxiety. Dr. Eli Lebowitz of Yale University talked with Emily Kircher-Morris about his research and work with children and their parents on managing anxiety and OCD. He’s also developed a program to teach parents how to help their children with anxiety, and to help therapists learn new therapy techniques. This was one of the biggest conversations of 2021, and for details go to the episode 88 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.

    • 44 min
    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Supporting Bright Kids (from episode 89)

    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Supporting Bright Kids (from episode 89)

    How can we knock down the walls that surround many neurodivergent kids? Should teachers play a role in their students’ social and emotional well-being, or is school only about academic rigor? What are some teaching techniques that will get kids talking and participating? Emily Kircher-Morris and Jim Delisle have a conversation about ways to release the potential often locked inside neurodivergent kids, and it was one of the biggest conversations of 2021. For more information about Jim Delisle’s work, visit the episode 89 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.

    • 36 min
    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Oppositional Defiant Disorder (from episode 92)

    2021’s Biggest Conversations: Oppositional Defiant Disorder (from episode 92)

    One of the more misunderstood diagnoses in the world of neurodiversity is ODD, or Oppositional Defiant Disorder. We talk with Amelia Bowler, a behavior consultant and author of the book “The Parent’s Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder,” about the diagnosis, and how to be better at decoding the message that kids are trying to send through their defiance. This conversation is from another of the most-downloaded episodes of 2021. For more information about Amelia and her book, go to the episode 92 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.

    • 32 min

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