68 episodes

One question. One story from Africa for Africa. Alan Kasujja takes a deep dive into the news shaping the continent.

Africa Daily BBC

    • News
    • 3.4 • 35 Ratings

One question. One story from Africa for Africa. Alan Kasujja takes a deep dive into the news shaping the continent.

    Why are so many teens getting pregnant?

    Why are so many teens getting pregnant?

    Covid-19 has put teenage girls’ futures at risk.

    Thousands of young girls across the continent never returned to school after lockdowns were lifted.

    And this is because, while they were away, many of these teenagers got pregnant.

    In fact, spikes in teen pregnancies have been reported in several countries across sub-Saharan Africa.

    So how did the problem get so bad? And what exactly can be done about it?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 12 min
    Has Twitter found a new home in Ghana?

    Has Twitter found a new home in Ghana?

    Twitter’s got its eye on Ghana.

    The social media giant wants to open new headquarters in Accra - the company’s first in Africa.

    Twitter’s also recruiting a dozen people to help it expand its reach across the continent.

    The news has been welcomed by many users, including the Ghanaian president himself.

    But how much of a difference could their move actually make?

    And can Africa really become a new home for big tech?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 12 min
    Why isn’t there more trade between African countries?

    Why isn’t there more trade between African countries?

    The African Continent Free Trade Agreement came into force this year with the aim of creating a borderless market for services, goods and commodities worth trillions of dollars for the region.
    It’s a high ambition for the 54 nation bloc and the World Bank estimates that the new trade regime could unlock growth in income of up to four-hundred and fifty billion dollars.
    It is expected to boost intra-African trade, generating millions of jobs for the continent’s youthful population.
    But little trade currently goes on between African countries and Bogolo Kenewendo, a former minister for trade in Botswana, says it’s not just tariffs that have hindered the process. She says it’s also about such things as product standard associations which are closely linked to colonial systems. She says for a country like Botswana it makes it easier to accept standard approved products from countries like the United Kingdom than it is from Uganda.
    The former minister says that this means that “instead of seeing each other as allies, we’ve seen competing sectors as just that, competing”.
    In Africa Daily Alan Kasujja looks at why more trade isn’t being done between African countries and what needs to change.

    • 14 min
    How will Samia Suluhu Hassan change Tanzania?

    How will Samia Suluhu Hassan change Tanzania?

    Tanzania’s new President seems to be taking the country in a new direction. She’s the only woman running an African country, having replaced John Pombe Magufuli, a popular leader in Tanzania, who died in March. Within the first week of taking office, she set up a taskforce to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The severity of the virus had been downplayed by the man she succeeds. And she’s also allowed some media outlets that had been censored to reopen.

    She’s signing big deals with her neighbours too! In her first state visit to Uganda, she launched a billion-dollar project with President Museveni, setting up the fuel pipeline that will run between the two countries. A project she hopes will bring jobs and prosperity to the East African community. In Africa Daily Alan Kasujja has been finding out how’s she’s doing.

    • 12 min
    Should Africa be concerned about Covid-19 variants?

    Should Africa be concerned about Covid-19 variants?

    South Africa’s President, Cyril Ramaphosa has said Africa needs the skills and capacity to manufacture its own Covid-19. vaccines. At a conference of African leaders, he said the world was watching “vaccine apartheid”.

    And it’s a fact that of the hundreds of millions of vaccines that have so far been given, less than two percent have been to Africans.

    Up until now Africa has had a low number of Covid-19 infections compared to Europe or the United States. This is because many African governments reacted quickly - they closed borders and imposed restrictions. But the World Health Organisation has warned another wave of Covid-19 infections could happen and that less developed heath care systems could find themselves struggling. So how concerned should we be by these new variants? Prof Salim Abdul Karim is the co-chair of the South African Covid-19 advisory committee. He said, “because we are still seeing transmission, we are seeing new variants”. He said when they discovered the new South African variant “they were very concerned” because this new variant “was able to cause infections in individuals who had already been infected” in the first wave. So, with Covid-19 variants spreading how worried should Africa be about them?

    • 14 min
    Why should places like Nairobi be short of water?

    Why should places like Nairobi be short of water?

    In Africa an estimated 160 million people live with water scarcity. Either because there isn’t enough water or it isn’t safe to consume. And the problem is worst in big urban areas. For places like Nairobi the problem is getting bigger with more people settling in the city. It's particularly bad in some areas, places like Dandora Phase 4 in the suburbs. Caroline Achieng used to sell tea there but the water shortages have forced her out of her trade. “If you wanted water, you would have to wake up at one am and fetch it.” She said “right now there is no water in the taps”. City authorities have blamed what have been described as water cartels for the problem. Those, who either hoard or sell water for profit. But is it really as simple as that? Professor George Okoye at Nairobi University says the city is “nineteen years late” with its infrastructure investment. In today’s Africa Daily Alan Kasujja looks at why cities like Nairobi are short of water

    • 16 min

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5
35 Ratings

35 Ratings

nqobizitha daniel dube ,

Not anti biased

I don’t believe that this podcast is SA anti biased,people are still drinking,police are buying and distributing in the black market,yet some of us have lost our jobs.There is no proper solution to this pandemic.People are still having parties,family gatherings that’s how it’s spreading.

NitPic'ie ,

Africa Daily: how dangerous is the south african covid variant

Listened to this podcast today and was shocked by the clear anti SA bias, how the journalist didn’t even bother to interview a South African physician.
Sloppy journalism and indicative of how BBC seems to be sliding in tabloid gossip as opposed to balanced reporting.

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