20 episodes

A Free and Open Exchange of Ideas and Opinions on All Things Space. Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @talkingspace!

Talking Space Gene Mikulka, Mark Ratterman & Sawyer Rosenstein

    • News

A Free and Open Exchange of Ideas and Opinions on All Things Space. Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @talkingspace!

    Episode 1202: Suborbital, Orbital, and Interplanetary

    Episode 1202: Suborbital, Orbital, and Interplanetary

    The “band” is back together to review some breaking news on the launch date for NASA’s upcoming Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover. We talk about the activities on the International Space Station, where NASA Astronauts Chris Cassidy performed a 6-hour 7-minute spacewalk to replace a set of lithium-ion batteries on the facility’s S6 truss. Completing this work will leave the ISS in an exemplary power configuration for the remainder of its operational life. 
    Attention turns to a Pre-spacewalk briefing NASA’s Kenny Todd, and Steve Stich had good words on how well the SpaceX Crew Dragon is performing for its first-time on-orbit and information on when perhaps the Crew-1 mission could fly. Also included was a status on where Boeing was with remediation work on the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft. 
    There was an abrupt “changing of the guard” at NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations office. Kathy Lueders, the Director of the Commercial Crew Program, was promoted to Associate Administrator for the Human Operations and Exploration Directorate replacing Douglas Loverro. He resigned under a ‘dark cloud’ for what he called ‘a mistake’ in his final letter to the HEO organization. That “mistake” is now under the microscope of the NASA Inspector General’s office. 
     
    The NASA Headquarters Building in Washington DC has a new name; we tell you who it is and why that honor was bestowed, plus give you a little hint about another historical figure of note we’re going to discuss on a future show. 
    Our grand ‘pundit of podcasts’, Mark Ratterman has a NASA Podcast that you may wish to add to your diet of space news and information: NASA Johnson’s “Houston We Have a Podcast.” 
    Want all of the Earth Observation satellite data that NASA, Europe and Japan have gathered about how the COVID 19 pandemic has impacted socioeconomic activity all in one place?  There’s now an appfor that! Introduced by all three space agencieson June 24th2020, it aggregates all of the data tracking air and water quality plus agricultural and economic activity all in one place. 
    Show recorded 6-28-2020
    Host: Sawyer Rosenstein
    Panelists: Gene Mikulka, Mark Ratterman, Kat Robison

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Episode 1201: Dragon, Arriving

    Episode 1201: Dragon, Arriving

    On this special episode of Talking Space, we devote the entire episode to the successful launch of Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station.
    The crew successfully launched in their Crew Dragon capsule on Demo-2, marking the first time humans have launched from the US since the end of the shuttle program in 2011.
    We go through the differences between Space Shuttle and Crew Dragon all the way from the suit-up room to orbit.
    We discuss the origins behind the spacecraft's name, Endeavour, along with a stow-away. We also talk about the small, New Jersey group that played a major role in the design of one of the aspects of the capsule.
    Then it's a look at their mission so far and what's to come. Plus, we've heard so many people try and take credit for the commercial crew program, so how did we get to Demo-2?
    Finally we reflect on the significance of the launch during a time of civil unrest and amidst a pandemic.
    Show recorded 6-7-2020
    Host: Sawyer Rosenstein
    Panelist: Gene Mikulka

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Episode 1108: The Path to #LaunchAmerica – In Flight Abort

    Episode 1108: The Path to #LaunchAmerica – In Flight Abort

    With astronauts set to return to space from U.S. soil for the first time in almost nine years, Talking Space is going back through the archives to bring you never-before-heard episodes on what it took to get to the historic Demo-2 launch in May 2020.
    For this episode, we go back to January 2020 when SpaceX tested the in-flight abort capabilities of their Crew Dragon capsule. Hear what it sounded like from launch to explosion...to a surprise after the intentional destruction of a Falcon 9 booster.
    Here's what it's like to root for a rocket to blow up. 
    This episode also includes an EXCLUSIVE sit-down with the Demo-2 crew. Shortly after the abort test, 15 media members sat down and talked with the crew of Demo-2 ahead of their mission. The audio has never been released in its entirety...until now. Hear it inside this episode.
    Show recorded 2-21-2020
    Host: Sawyer Rosenstein
    Panelist: Gene Mikulka
     

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Episode 1107: The Path to #LaunchAmerica - Demo-1

    Episode 1107: The Path to #LaunchAmerica - Demo-1

    With astronauts set to return to space from U.S. soil for the first time in almost nine years, Talking Space is going back through the archives to bring you never-before-heard episodes on what it took to get to the historic Demo-2 launch in May 2020.
    For this episode, we go back to March 2019 for the Demo-1 mission. This was the uncrewed version of the Demo-2 mission, instead with a "test dummy" onboard, even if SpaceX doesn't call it that.
    Hear the sound of the launch, as well as hear of the significance of this mission from the heads of the Kennedy Space Center and Johnson Space Center.
    We'll also hear from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on why more innovation is happening now than during the entire Apollo program.
    Show recorded 3-2019
    Host: Sawyer Rosenstein
    Panelist: Gene Mikulka

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Episode 1106- On the Shores Of the Ocean of Storms: Celebrating Apollo 12

    Episode 1106- On the Shores Of the Ocean of Storms: Celebrating Apollo 12

    In this installment of Talking Space, on the very day fifty years ago we look back at the accomplishment that was the Apollo 12 mission by letting its crew Mission Commander Charles " Pete" Conrad, Command Module Pilot Richard Gordon, and Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean tell their "travelers tales" to us during a post-flight press conference. 
    Apollo 12 did a lot more than simply get hit lightning on its way to the Moon, Conrad and Bean brought on board their Lunar Module, Intrepid,  accomplished the first piloted precision landing on the lunar Ocean of Storms region some 500 feet away from where the Surveyor 3 spacecraft had landed some 31 months earlier. A precision landing was key to future exploration of the lunar surface.
    The duo of Conrad and Bean performed a geological survey of the landing site, successfully set up the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package or ALSEP, and conducted a full inspection of the Surveyor 3 spacecraft, removing three items from the probe to return to Earth for material study.
    Richard Gordon on board the Command Service Module Yankee Clipper was able to locate the landing site from lunar orbit and perform a photographic study of two future landing sites, the Fra Mauro Highlands targeted for Apollo 13 and the Descartes Region which would be the landing site for Apollo 16. 
    Join us as we recount the story of Apollo 12 with those who lived it. 
    Host: Gene Mikulka 

    • 49 min
    Episode 1105: Apollo 4 - Paving the Way to the Lunar Surface

    Episode 1105: Apollo 4 - Paving the Way to the Lunar Surface

    In this special edition of Talking Space, we look back into the NASA audio archives and discover a hidden gem that might get lost in United States space flight history. 
    On November 9, 1967, months after the United States lost three intrepid explorers duing a spacecraft test, The Apollo Progam arose like the mythical phoenix and launched the most powerfull launch vehicle the world had ever seen, the 364-foot tall Apollo Saturn V Rocket. 
    Apollo 4 set sail from a brand new port, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center from a brand new launch complex, Launch Complex 39, and with the sucesssfull conclusion of the mission some 8 hours 36 minutes and 59 seconds later, restored confidence in the US Human Spaceflight Program. 
    What is to follow is the post flight press conference for Apollo 4. In attendaence were space flight giants, with names like Robert Seamans, George Muller, Kurt Debus, George Low, and Werner von Braun. 
    Its a time capsule of sorts, a moment that paved the way for the human exploration of the lunar surface for the first time, but also may give a hint of future events in NASA’s Artemis program. 
    Host:
    Gene Mikulka 

    • 1 hr 1 min

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