667 episodes

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes is a personal development podcast focused on exploring the day-to-day behaviors we all engage in that determine the results we gain in our lives. Hosted by Gregg Clunis, the show shares simple strategies you can implement into your life to start moving the needle towards your biggest goals.

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes Gregg Clunis

    • Mental Health
    • 4.5 • 6 Ratings

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes is a personal development podcast focused on exploring the day-to-day behaviors we all engage in that determine the results we gain in our lives. Hosted by Gregg Clunis, the show shares simple strategies you can implement into your life to start moving the needle towards your biggest goals.

    628 - Top 3 Relationship Podcasts (December 2020)

    628 - Top 3 Relationship Podcasts (December 2020)

    In this episode, I share 3 relationship podcasts I think you need to be listening to. 

    Sponsor: Join Tiny Leaps Plus today for just $5 and if you aren’t happy within 30 days a full refund will be offered. Head over to www.tinyleapsplus.com today to learn more. That’s www.tinyleapsplus.com






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    • 13 min
    627 - How to Stop Reacting Emotionally

    627 - How to Stop Reacting Emotionally

    In this episode, we look at how to stop reacting emotionally to tough situations. 

    Sponsor: Head over to www.blinkist.com/tinyleaps to get 25% off and a 7-day free trial. www.blinkist.com/tinyleaps

    The Problem

    You’ve probably heard before that humans are emotional creatures who make decisions based purely on feeling and then try to justify it afterwards with logic.

    This isn’t a new idea, it’s one that I’ve shared on this podcast in the past and it’s one that many others have discussed as well.

    This isn’t by accident. There are a few different ways that we process information but things tend to start with the amygdala (or the croc brain as some call it). This is the part of the brain that most if not all species have.

    Digging Deeper

    Before we can talk about fixing the issue we need to better understand what is going on. As I mentioned earlier, the Amygdala's job is to process information before it gets to the prefrontal cortex.

    With that said, when something gets to the Amygdala we aren’t actually make a decision on the information. Afterall, the definition of a decision is

    “A conclusion or resolution reached after consideration”

    In order to make a decision we need to think about something. That’s not what the Amygdala does.

    The Solution

    The answer is simply to slow the situation down. We now know that changing the immediate emotional reaction is a tough task. This is because the Amygdala’s job is to create an autonomic response to the information it receives.

    So don’t waste any time beating yourself up because you had an immediate negative response to something. Yes, logically you know that it’s not a real issue, but your brain never had a chance to process that. It’s okay.

    So since we can’t change that autonomic response, our only choice is to slow down the external situation. This gives us time to push back against the autonomic response and create a better response.


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    • 14 min
    626 - How to Improve Your Sleep Cycle

    626 - How to Improve Your Sleep Cycle

    In this episode, we look at how to improve your sleep cycle. 

    Sponsor: You can join Tiny Leaps Plus today for just $5 and if you aren’t happy within 30 days a full refund will be offered. Head over to www.tinyleapsplus.com today to learn more. That’s www.tinyleapsplus.com

    Here’s a good way to start the show...

    Why do you need to improve your sleep cycle in the first place? Improving your sleep cycle is actually going to make you more productive, you will have more energy and can get quality work done. It is one of the best ways to optimise your health. Research has shown that poor quality sleep has negative effects on your body, hormones, performance and even brain function! With all that being said why wouldn't you want to improve your sleep cycle?

    So let's dive right into the strategies

    Today's Episode Was Written By: Samridhi Jain | https://www.instagram.com/samridhiii__/


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    • 12 min
    625 - Why Smoking is Easier Than Working Out

    625 - Why Smoking is Easier Than Working Out

    In this episode, we look at why smoking is so much easier than working out. 

    Sponsor: http://andstillivote.org

    The Problem

    We all know the “right” things to do. If you want to lose weight, eat better and exercise. If you want to get out of debt, live below your means and save your money. If you want to improve your relationship, create lines of open communication with each other.

    Chances are if you have a goal for your life you are also FULLY aware of how to accomplish it. And even if you aren’t 100% positive on the exact formula, you at least know what direction to go in.

    And even more, let’s pretend that you have a goal and have absolutely no idea at all how to accomplish it. There are plenty of resources like this podcast, google, or books to help you out.

    My point is that we have absolutely no problem figuring out what to do to make progress.

    Digging Deeper

    Researchers over the years have come up with a reliable theory on how habits are formed. We’ve discussed this in past episodes but as a bit of a refresher, a habit requires 3 things in order to be created.

    First it needs a trigger, this is the external thing that your behavior is responding to. Second it needs a behavior, this is the core activity of the habit, finally it needs some kind of reward.

    Once the trigger happens, if we take the behavior our brains use a process called Myelination to reinforce the circuitry responsible. This allows the response to the initial trigger to become much faster. We essentially become more efficient in order to use less energy the next time.

    The Solution

    Honestly this is a difficult question to answer. There is no way to get results from the gym faster. There is no way to reduce the pleasures of engaging in bad habits.

    Since we can’t change this dynamic between good habits and bad habits there is really only one thing we can do. Accept that building good habits is going to suck. Like seriously suck. And it sucks for a reason, your brain wants there to be a clear reward from that activity. That’s how it tricks you into doing it. If you work out for long enough you will start to feel that reward in the release of neurochemicals. You’ll start to see that reward in your body. But you’ve gotta make it to that point before you can take advantage of it.


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    • 12 min
    624 - How to Be a Supportive Partner

    624 - How to Be a Supportive Partner

    In this episode, we look at how to be a supportive partner. 

    Written By: Sophie Sumpter | https://www.instagram.com/sorosum/

    Sponsor: 

    Head over to www.betterhelp.com/tinyleaps and use the discount code tiny leaps to get 10% off your first month. That's  www.betterhelp.com/tinyleaps coupon code tiny leaps.

    The Problem:

    Choosing to share your life with a romantic partner looks different for everyone. Cohabitating, long distance relationships, choosing to have children or not. There are a lot of choices and none of them are necessarily “right” or “wrong”. However, there is one common denominator among every successful relationship: your partner will one day face challenges that are outside of your control and outside of your experience. So how do you support them when you can’t move a roadblock out of their path? Is it even your responsibility to move it?

    Digging Deeper:

    Throughout the course of your relationship, the type of support that your partner needs may change. Mental illness, chronic pain, cancer, or family deaths name a few of the unpredictable things that may throw your relationship for a loop. According to the National Law Review, stress about finances, parenting disagreements, and household responsibilities are some of the most common challenges faced in relationships. To make things worse, COVID-19 has heightened anxieties leading to an uptick in divorce rates (National Law Review, 2020). According to the New York Post, the number of people seeking divorce from March to June of this year was 34% higher than March to June of 2019 (Rosner, 2020). Newly weds seem to be the demographic seeking divorce at a higher rate than ever before (Rosner, 2020).

    The Solution

    Supporting your partner through a difficult situation involves first realizing that we all have problems that we go through. This seems like a general statement that we are all aware of, but it’s important to acknowledge and be reminded of. Our partner’s struggles may be similar to or the same problem as the ones we are facing, but their experience is entirely independent of our own. It can be easy to ignore this when we get so caught up in our own day to day struggle. We may experience the exact same thing as another person, such as the pandemic, but no two experiences are exactly the same.

    SOURCES:

    Medina, Raphael. Supporting Your Partner: Long Term Illness. (2020). Ultimate Love Counseling & Coaching. 

    Retrieved from https://ultimatelovecc.com.supporting-your-partner-long-term-illness/.

    Rosner, Elizabeth. (2020). Divorce Rates Skyrocket in US Amidst Pandemic. New York Post.

    Retrieved from https://nypost.com/2020/09/01/divorce-rates-skyrocket-in-u-s-amid-covid-19/.

    National Law Review. (2020). Divorce Rates and COVID-19. 

    Retrieved from https://www.natlawreview.com/article/divorce-rates-and-covid-19.

    Cramer, Duncan. (2006). How Supportive Partner May Increase Relationship Satisfaction.

    British Journal of Guidance & Counseling. 

    Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03069880500483141




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    • 10 min
    623 - How We Form Habits

    623 - How We Form Habits

    In this episode, we look at how we form habits.

    Sponsor: Right now Blinkist has a special offer just for our audience. Go to blinkist.com/TINYLEAPS to start your free 7 day trial and get 25% off of a Blinkist Premium membership.

    The Problem

    I’ve mentioned on this podcast a number of times that the secret to moving forward is taking consistent action over long periods of time. I’ve also spent an enormous amount of time talking about how taking advantage of the habit system can make it significantly easier to do that.

    The process for change becomes really simple when we break it down into these two things.


    You identify the change you want to create
    You figure out the key behavior that will drive it
    You turn that behavior into a habit
    Over time the change occurs

    It’s basic, straightforward, and makes sense. But obviously simple and basic aren’t quite enough to create change.

    Digging Deeper

    You may already know this but let’s quickly cover what exactly a habit is. According to Oxford, a habit is defined as a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.

    In other words, they are the things you regularly lean towards doing when faced with a similar situation. This could be something good for you like brushing your teeth or it could be something detrimental like responding negatively to anxiety.

    This is an important point. From the brain’s point of view, there is no difference between a good habit and a bad habit. There are just tendencies in our behavior that get reinforced.

    So how do habits form? In a response on the website 1440.org Dr. Judson Brewer said this about habits:

    “In brain speak, the habit loop needs a trigger, a behavior, and a reward.”

    The Solution

    Well the first thing to remember is that it doesn’t matter whether you are purposefully building a good habit or accidentally building a bad habit. The process is going to be the same. This means you need to be careful of how you respond to things.

    But assuming that we want to purposefully build a good habit, one that aligns with the goals we’ve set, then we simply need to look at the process and try to create those outcomes.

    We need a trigger of some kind and we need a similar context. This could be anything, just pick something that you can repeat on a close to daily basis. This is why tools like Habit Stacking, the process of piling a new habit on top of an existing habit work. The existing habit already has a trigger and so you piggy back your new habit with that existing trigger.




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    • 12 min

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