300 episodes

News features and analysis from Financial Times reporters around the world. FT News in Focus is produced by Fiona Symon.

FT News in Focus Financial Times

    • News Commentary

News features and analysis from Financial Times reporters around the world. FT News in Focus is produced by Fiona Symon.

    K-pop: shaped by fans and shaken by scandals

    K-pop: shaped by fans and shaken by scandals

    K-Pop has never been more popular. However, a recent string of high profile controversies including a rape conviction and two suicides have sullied the image of the Korean cultural export. Edward White talks to Patricia Nilsson about what makes a K-Pop star, why the singers are under so much pressure, and what the industry means to the country’s economy.


    Contributors: Edward White, Seoul correspondent and Patricia Nilsson, Media reporter. Producer: Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 14 min
    Can electric car pioneer Tesla maintain its momentum?

    Can electric car pioneer Tesla maintain its momentum?

    Shares in Elon Musk’s pioneering electric car company Tesla have skyrocketed. Tom Braithwaite discusses whether the company will be able to maintain its current momentum and hold off competition from traditional carmakers with Jamie Powell and Richard Waters.


    Contributors: Tom Braithwaite, companies news editor, Jamie Powell, Alphaville reporter, and Richard Waters, West Coast editor. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 16 min
    China's battle against the coronavirus

    China's battle against the coronavirus

    The full impact of the deadly Sars-like virus that has spread across China will take time to assess. But it’s clear there will be significant damage to the region’s economies and perhaps also to the reputation of China’s leaders for failing to tackle the coronavirus early enough to prevent its spread. Andreas Paleit discusses the political and economic impact of the outbreak with Tom Hancock, recently back from Wuhan, James Kynge in Hong Kong and Sue-Lin Wong in Shenzhen.


    Contributors: Andreas Paleit, companies desk editor, Tom Hancock, China consumer industries correspondent, Sue-Lin Wong, South China correspondent, and James Kynge, global China editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 19 min
    Holding back the floods

    Holding back the floods

    Global warming is set to cause a significant rise in sea levels as the world's polar ice melts. The Netherlands is the best-protected delta in the world, with centuries of experience in holding back the floods. As climate change takes its toll, can Dutch expertise help save the world’s cities that are most at risk? Simon Kuper looked into this question for the FT's weekend magazine and he tells Esther Bintliff what he discovered. Read Simon's magazine article here


    Contributors: Simon Kuper, FT columnist, and Esther Bintliff, FT Weekend Magazine deputy editor. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 18 min
    Does the Fed have a communication problem?

    Does the Fed have a communication problem?

    The US Federal Reserve has begun to consult the public, particularly in poorer parts of the country about monetary policy. As a result, policy wonks at the central bank have begun to reconsider the impact of their decisions on communities far from the centres of power. Brendan Greeley discusses the so-called Fed Listens sessions with Patrick Jenkins.


    Contributors: Patrick Jenkins, Deputy Editor and Brendan Greeley, US economics editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love. Photo credit: Alex Wong/Getty For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 14 min
    Putin seeks to secure his legacy with power shake-up

    Putin seeks to secure his legacy with power shake-up

    Russia’s president Vladimir Putin has been in power for two decades and now it looks as though he intends to stay indefinitely. He has launched an overhaul of the country’s power structures that could allow him to extend his control after his official term ends in 2024. Katie Martin discusses the move with Max Seddon in Moscow and Ben Hall, Europe editor.


    Contributors: Katie Martin, capital markets editor, Max Seddon, Moscow correspondent, and Ben Hall, Europe editor. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 17 min

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