247 episodes

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Tuesday on Economist Radio.

Money Talks from Economist Radio The Economist

    • Business News

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Tuesday on Economist Radio.

    Money Talks: Supply strain

    Money Talks: Supply strain

    As the Wuhan coronavirus continues to spread, what effect will factory closures in China have on global supply chains? Also, how technology is finally poised to disrupt the market for real estate. And what it takes to be a CEO in 2020. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 


     
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    • 21 min
    Money Talks: Business after Brexit

    Money Talks: Business after Brexit

    After Britain’s official departure from the European Union on January 31st, the government faces a divergence dilemma: departing from the EU's rules may mean less access to its markets. The Economist’s Britain business editor Tamzin Booth explains the costs and opportunities of a directive-free future. And Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, and city financier Dame Helena Morrissey discuss what government and business must do to adapt. Patrick Lane hosts


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    • 19 min
    Money Talks: Market contagion

    Money Talks: Market contagion

    Concern over the new coronavirus caused global stockmarkets to fall. Could the Wuhan virus hurt economic growth in China more than the SARS virus did? Also, how can India’s economy recover from “stagflation”? And, the “father of disruptive innovation” has died—the legacy of Clayton Christensen’s management lessons. Simon Long hosts.


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    • 21 min
    Money Talks: Goldilocks economy

    Money Talks: Goldilocks economy

    America’s biggest banks posted record profits last week, despite falling interest rates. This week the attention turns to smaller lenders. Why might they not do so well? Also, why precious metals rhodium and palladium make gold look cheap. And, ganbei! The world’s biggest alcoholic-drinks company, finding success in doing everything… wrong. Simon Long hosts 


     
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    • 17 min
    Money Talks: Experiencing turbulence

    Money Talks: Experiencing turbulence

    Boeing has a new chief executive. What does he need to do to restore faith in the world’s biggest aerospace company? Also, why some countries are trying to ditch the dollar and challenge America’s dominance of the global financial cycle. And, how can the economics profession solve its race problem? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


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    • 23 min
    Money Talks: Full battle rattle

    Money Talks: Full battle rattle

    Oil and gold prices spiked after the killing of Qassem Suleimani, an Iranian general, by the United States. How might heightened tension in the Middle East affect these important commodity markets in the weeks ahead? And, at the American Economic Association’s annual meeting, Ben Bernanke reflected on how successfully the Fed has adapted to a world of ultra-low interest rates. Also, why consumer shame now means it pays to be ethical. Patrick Lane hosts 


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    • 24 min

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