162 episodes

ASCO Guidelines features key recommendations from the latest evidence-based clinical practice guidance from ASCO that you can access on the go.

ASCO Guidelines American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.5 • 2 Ratings

ASCO Guidelines features key recommendations from the latest evidence-based clinical practice guidance from ASCO that you can access on the go.

    Selection of Germline Genetic Testing Panels in Patients with Cancer Guideline

    Selection of Germline Genetic Testing Panels in Patients with Cancer Guideline

    Ms. Charité Ricker, MS, CGC and Dr. Nadine Tung, MD, FASCO share updates from the new ASCO guideline on selection of germline genetic testing panels in patients with cancer. They discuss highlights on family history collection, when and how multigene panel germline genetic testing should be used, which genes are generally recommended for testing, and how germline genetic testing interfaces with somatic genetic testing. Ms. Ricker and Dr. Tung also note the importance of the guideline and the impact of these new recommendations on clinicians and patients with cancer.

    Read the full guideline, “Selection of Germline Genetic Testing Panels in Patients with Cancer: ASCO Guideline” at www.asco.org/molecular-testing-and-biomarkers-guidelines.
    TRANSCRIPT
    GDL 24E13
    This guideline, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/molecular-testing-and-biomarkers-guidelines. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.24.00662 
    Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast, one of ASCO’s podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one at asco.org/podcasts
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Nadine Tung, a medical oncologist from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and Ms. Charité Ricker, a cancer genetic counselor with the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Southern California and Los Angeles General Medical Center, co-chairs on, “Selection of Germline Genetic Testing Panels in Patients with Cancer: ASCO Guideline.”
    Thank you for being here, Ms. Ricker and Dr. Tung.
    Dr. Nadine Tung: Pleasure. 
    Ms. Charité Ricker: Thank you.
    Brittany Harvey: Then, before we discuss this guideline, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the guideline panel, including Dr. Tung and Ms. Ricker, who have joined us here today, are available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which is linked in the show notes.  
    So then, to start us off first, Dr. Tung, could you provide us a broad overview of both the purpose and scope of this guideline?
    Dr. Nadine Tung: Sure. A main impetus for creating the guideline is that oncologists are increasingly being tasked with ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer risk for their cancer patients. More and more now, they may find themselves sending the test and then seeking guidance from genetic experts to interpret the result. And these panels range from focused tests with just a few genes to comprehensive ones that include over 100 genes. So it can be very overwhelming for an oncologist to be able to understand ordering these tests and explaining them to their patients. So, we believe that it was important to offer some guidance and direction on the use of these multigene panels.
    Brittany Harvey: Thank you for setting the stage for this guideline and the recommendations that come from it.  
    So then, Ms. Ricker, this guideline addresses four overarching clinical questions. I'd like to review the recommendations based on each of those questions for our listeners. So starting with that first question, what is the importance of family history collection in the setting of germline multigene panel testing and which elements of family history are the most important?
    Ms. Charité Ricker: Thanks. As a genetic counselor, this is probably one of my favorite questions. I love the opportunity we have to sit with families and really dig into family history. But family history collection can be overwhelming and a big lift so

    • 17 min
    Therapy for Stage IV NSCLC With Driver Alterations: ASCO Living Guideline Update 2024.1

    Therapy for Stage IV NSCLC With Driver Alterations: ASCO Living Guideline Update 2024.1

    Dr. Jyoti Patel discusses the latest update to the stage IV NSCLC with driver alterations living guideline, specifically for patients with EGFR or ROS1 alterations. She shares the latest recommendations based on recently published evidence, such as the FLAURA2, MARIPOSA-2, and TRIDENT-1 trials. Dr. Patel talks about how to choose between these new options and the impact for patients living with stage IV NSCLC, as well as novel drugs the panel is monitoring for future guideline updates.
    Read the full living guideline update “Therapy for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Driver Alterations: ASCO Living Guideline, Version 2024.1” at www.asco.org/living-guidelines.
    TRANSCRIPT
    This guideline, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/living-guidelines. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.24.00762 
    Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast, one of ASCO’s podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one at asco.org/podcasts.
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Jyoti Patel from Northwestern University, co-chair on, “Therapy for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Driver Alterations: ASCO Living Guideline, Version 2024.1.” 
    Thank you for being here today, Dr. Patel.
    Dr. Jyoti Patel: Thanks so much.  
    Brittany Harvey: Then, before we discuss this guideline, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the guideline panel, including Dr. Patel, who has joined us here today, are available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which is linked in the show notes. 
    So then to dive into the content of why we're here today, Dr. Patel, this living clinical practice guideline for systemic therapy for patients with stage four non-small cell lung cancer with driver alterations is being updated on a regular basis. So what prompted the update to the recommendations in this latest update? 
    Dr. Jyoti Patel: This recent update, I think, absolutely reflects how quickly the science is changing. The landscape of treatment options for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer is evolving so rapidly, and guidelines from even six months ago don't address some of the newest approvals and newest data and the newest clinical scenarios that we're presented with when we see patients. I think it's harder because before there was usually a single answer, and now there are a number of scenarios, and we hope that the guideline addresses this.
    Brittany Harvey: Absolutely. The panel's had a lot of data to review as you keep this guideline up to date. 
    So then this latest update addresses updates to both EGFR and ROS1 alterations. So starting with EGFR, what are the updated recommendations for patients with stage four non-small cell lung cancer and an EGFR exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R substitution? 
    Dr. Jyoti Patel: So for patients with classical driver mutations in EGFR, our recommendation remains that patients should be offered osimertinib. We now also have data to support intensification of therapy with osimertinib and chemotherapy. The FLAURA2 trial was a global randomized study in which patients with classical mutations were assigned to receive either osimertinib or osimertinib with doublet chemotherapy. The trial showed that progression free survival was longer with osimertinib plus chemotherapy with a hazard ratio that was pretty profound, 0.62. In patients who had CNS metastasis as well as patients with L858R mutations, this benefit remained and was perhaps

    • 12 min
    Antineoplastic Therapy Administration Safety Standards for Adult and Pediatric Oncology: ASCO-ONS Standards

    Antineoplastic Therapy Administration Safety Standards for Adult and Pediatric Oncology: ASCO-ONS Standards

    Dr. Bradley Hunter, MD, MPH and Ms. Amy Evers, BSN, RN, OCN, MBA join us on the latest episode of the ASCO Guidelines Podcast to share key points and insights on the updated ASCO-ONS antineoplastic therapy administration safety standards for adult and pediatric oncology standards. They highlight key updates across the four standards domains: (1) creating a safe environment, (2) patient consent and patient education, (3) ordering, preparing, dispensing, and administering oral and parenteral antineoplastic therapies in a health care facility, organization, or in the home, and (4) monitoring during and after antineoplastic therapy is administered, including adherence, toxicity, and complications. They also comment on the importance of these standards to provide a framework for optimal safe and effective care for all patients.
    Read the standards, “Antineoplastic Therapy Administration Safety Standards for Adult and Pediatric Oncology: ASCO-ONS Standards” at www.asco.org/standards.
    TRANSCRIPT
    These standards, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/standards. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the JCO Oncology Practice, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/OP.24.00216
    Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast, one of ASCO's podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges, and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts.
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Bradley Hunter from Intermountain Health and Amy Evers from the University of Pennsylvania, authors on “Antineoplastic Therapy Administration Safety Standards for Adult and Pediatric Oncology: American Society of Clinical Oncology – Oncology Nursing Society Standards.” Thank you both for being here.
    Dr. Bradley Hunter: Yeah, thanks. Good to be with you.
    Amy Evers: Thank you.
    Brittany Harvey: Now, before we discuss these standards, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidance products and ensuring that the ASCO Conflict of Interest Policy is followed for all standards. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the expert panel are available online with the publication of the standards in the JCO Oncology Practice, which is linked in the show notes. 
    So then to start us off, Dr. Hunter, what prompted an update to the ASCO-ONS standards? And what is the scope of this update?
    Dr. Bradley Hunter: The last guidelines were published in 2016. And just thinking about in the world of oncology, so much has changed since that time. There are a lot of therapies that have become commonplace now that were really not used too much before, including oral genomically determined targeted therapies, immunomodulatory agents, CAR T cell therapy, bispecific antibodies, etc. So there's really been a need to just talk about how do we navigate those therapies and how do we create systems of care in which they are delivered safely. Additionally, the sites of care have changed. I think all of us, eight years ago, wouldn’t have imagined a global pandemic, and how that would have changed the way that we needed to deliver oncology care. So there's been a huge influx of telehealth, including tele-oncology centers, where the oncologist and the patient may never even meet face to face, but just by video. And so it relies on a team approach for that sort of an outreach setting. Intermountain Health spans seven states, there are so many sites like this that we have and I know that we are not unique. This is an issue and a global thing now. Additionally, patients are even getting chemo in their own homes, so that has changed and we need to figure out how to address that so that everyone could be able to have that site of care so they can get there and they can get their therapy in a safe manner. 
    So, these

    • 17 min
    Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer – CDK4/6 Inhibitors Rapid Update

    Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer – CDK4/6 Inhibitors Rapid Update

    Dr. Rachel Freedman and Dr. Sharon Giordano share the latest rapid guideline update from ASCO on the adjuvant use of the CDK4/6 inhibitors abemaciclib and ribociclib in patients with stage II and III breast cancer. They share details on the impetus for the update, supporting evidence, and considerations of benefits and harms for individuals. Additionally, Drs. Freedman and Giordano discuss what these options mean for clinicians and patients, and outstanding questions regarding optimal adjuvant chemotherapy and targeted therapy for patients with early breast cancer.
    Read the full rapid update, “Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer – CDK4/6 Inhibitors: ASCO Rapid Guideline Update” at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines."


    TRANSCRIPT
    This guideline, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.24.00886 
    Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast, one of ASCO's podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges, and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one at asco.org/podcasts.
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Rachel Freedman from Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Dr. Sharon Giordano from MD Anderson Cancer Center, co-chairs on “Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer – CDK 4/6 Inhibitors: ASCO Rapid Guideline Update.” Thank you for being here, Dr. Freedman and Dr. Giordano.
    Dr. Rachel Freedman: Hi. It's great to be here, thank you.
    Dr. Sharon Giordano: Yeah, thank you for having us.
    Brittany Harvey: Great. Then, before we discuss this guideline, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the guideline panel, including Dr. Freedman and Dr. Giordano, who have joined us here today, are available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which is linked in the show notes.
    So then, to dive into the content here. First, Dr. Freedman, what prompted this update to the “Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer Guideline”, which was previously updated in 2021?
    Dr. Rachel Freedman: Yeah, at that time, we published guidelines which were part of an amendment to the previously published 2020 early breast cancer guidelines to include consideration of adjuvant CDK4/6 inhibitor use, because the first data for adjuvant abemaciclib became available from the monarchE trial, and because the FDA had acted to grant approval for the use of abemaciclib in those with node positive disease and a Ki-67 score of at least 20%. Our recommendation at that time was to apply abemaciclib in the greater context of the intention-to-treat population included on the monarchE study.
    But since that time, the FDA in 2023 expanded its approval for adjuvant abemaciclib for a broader population, removing that Ki-67 requirement that was a part of their initial approval. With this change, the recently published longer term data from the monarchE study and the recently published data from the NATALEE trial and adjuvant ribociclib study, we felt that it was time to update our guidelines to be more relevant to the most current data available.
    Brittany Harvey: I appreciate you providing that background information on the impetus for this latest update.
    So then, Dr. Giordano, based on this new data, what are the updated recommendations in the latest version of this guideline?
    Dr. Sharon Giordano: So we really have two updated recommendations and then two qualifying statements t

    • 11 min
    Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: ASCO-SIO Guideline Update

    Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: ASCO-SIO Guideline Update

    Dr. Karen Mustian joins us to share the latest update to the management of fatigue in adult survivors of cancer guideline from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Society for Integrative Oncology. Dr. Mustian highlights the recommendations across the continuum of care, including recommendations for patients with cancer-related fatigue during active treatment, after treatment, and for patients with advanced cancer or at the end of life. She also discusses interventions that are not recommended for treating cancer-related fatigue. The episode wraps up discussing the importance of this guideline for clinicians and patients, and a call for more research both on interventions and on dissemination and implementation to improve symptom management for cancer-related fatigue.
    Read the full guideline update, “Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: ASCO-SIO Guideline Update” at www.asco.org/survivorship-guidelines.
    TRANSCRIPT
    This guideline, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/survivorship-guidelines. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.24.00541 
     Brittany Harvey: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast, one of ASCO's podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges, and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts.  
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Karen Mustian from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Wilmot Cancer Institute in New York, co-chair on “Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology –Society for Integrative Oncology Guideline.” Thank you for being here, Dr. Mustian.
    Dr. Karen Mustian: Thank you for having me, Brittany.
    Brittany Harvey: Then, before we discuss this guideline, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the guideline panel, including Dr. Mustian, who has joined us here today, are available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which is linked in the show notes. 
    So then, to dive into the content of this episode, Dr. Mustian, what is the purpose and scope of this updated guideline on fatigue in adult survivors of cancer?
    Dr. Karen Mustian: Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common and debilitating consequences that patients experience when they go through treatment, and it can actually interfere with their ability to complete treatment and their recovery along the way. And it's not the same as a typical fatigue that you might experience from physical activity, let's say, where you can come back in and rest for a little while or take a nap or sleep, and you wake up refreshed and not feeling fatigued anymore. This type of fatigue actually needs special attention and needs to be treated with therapies.  
    So, this particular guideline is developed in a manner to help clinicians when patients present with fatigue, especially moderate to severe fatigue, that can be very debilitating, help patients decide what kinds of treatments they can use to reduce this fatigue. It's really important that this fatigue be reduced for a number of reasons. But some of the reasons we think of as being really critical are so that they can actually get their full treatment as prescribed, and then when finished with treatment, so they can actually resume their normal daily activities. They can keep working, they can keep engaging with their families, they can resume all those wonderful normal life activities that we hope for and that their prognosis will be a good one.
    Brittany Harvey: Absolutely.

    • 19 min
    Palliative Care for Patients with Cancer Guideline Update

    Palliative Care for Patients with Cancer Guideline Update

    Dr. Debra Lundquist, PhD, RN and Dr. Arun Ghoshal, MD, MBBS discuss the new update to the palliative care for patients with cancer guideline developed by an interdisciplinary Expert Panel. They share the key updated recommendations on the most effective palliative care interventions, how these recommendations relate to other supportive care services, interventions for family caregivers, care partners, and communities, referrals to specialist palliative care services, and specific strategies for the integration of palliative care for patients with hematologic malignancies and those on early phase clinical trials. Dr. Lunquist and Dr. Ghoshal also discuss the contextual factors that affect equity at the intersection of palliative and oncology care, the impact of this guideline refresh for clinicians and patients, and future innovations in the field of palliative care. Read the full guideline update, “Palliative Care for Patients with Cancer: ASCO Guideline Update” at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines.
    TRANSCRIPT
    This guideline, clinical tools, and resources are available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines. Read the full text of the guideline and review authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.24.00542
    Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast, one of ASCO’s podcasts delivering timely information to keep you up to date on the latest changes, challenges, and advances in oncology. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts.   
    My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Arun Ghoshal from Princess Margaret Cancer Center and Dr. Debra Lundquist from Massachusetts General Hospital, authors on, “Palliative Care for Patients with Cancer: ASCO Guideline Update.” Thank you for being here, Dr. Ghoshal and Dr. Lundquist.
    Dr. Ghoshal: Thanks, Brittany. Thank you for having us here.
    Dr. Lundquist: Yes, it's a pleasure.
    Brittany Harvey: Great. Then before we discuss this guideline, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The disclosures of potential conflicts of interest for the guideline panel, including Dr. Lundquist and Dr. Ghoshal, who have joined us here today, are available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which is linked in the show notes. 
    So then, to start us off, Dr. Lundquist, what prompted this guideline update, and what is the scope of the current update for palliative care for patients with cancer?
    Dr. Lundquist: Sure. So the goal of this refresh is really to provide oncology professionals with current recommendations regarding palliative care and assess which of the 2016 recommendations remain valid. The scope did increase to also include hematologic malignancies and participants of early phase clinical trials. In addition, this was an opportunity to reflect more recent evidence around the understanding of linguistic, geographic, ethical, and contextual factors that affect equity at the intersection of palliative and oncology care. This update also increased discussion about the inclusion of palliative care, as I mentioned earlier, for the enrollment of patients in clinical trials. And also, in terms of the equity piece, there is also a companion manuscript with the guidelines that focused on the health equity in the oncology palliative care setting.
    Brittany Harvey: Excellent. Thank you for setting the stage for this update, Dr. Lundquist.  
    So then next, I'd like to review the key updated recommendations for our listeners. So starting with clinical question one, Dr. Ghoshal, what are the key recommendations regarding the most effective interventions to provide palliative care to patients with cancer?
    Dr. Ghoshal: As we know, healthcare providers s

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

The Imperfects
Hugh van Cuylenburg, Ryan Shelton & Josh van Cuylenburg
Huberman Lab
Scicomm Media
Perform with Dr. Andy Galpin
Scicomm Media
ZOE Science & Nutrition
ZOE
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: GP & Author
Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley
BBC Radio 4

You Might Also Like

ASCO Daily News
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
Two Onc Docs
Sam and Karine
Plenary Session
Vinay Prasad, MD MPH
Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
NEJM This Week
NEJM Group
ASCO Education
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)