75 episodes

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox JoAnn Fox: Buddhist Teacher

    • Buddhism

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

    Episode 72 - Love in The Time of Coronavirus

    Episode 72 - Love in The Time of Coronavirus

    This episode is about a very old Buddhist practice called ‘transforming adversity into the spiritual path’ and is intended to give quick relief and peace in these challenging times. Our world has changed so much since the arising of the coronavirus pandemic. We can transform our personal struggles and anxiety into the spiritual path by cherishing others. This will bring us inner calm, happiness and solve tension between people.
     
    This practice involves cherishing others in three ways:
    Making ourselves calm and relaxed for the benefit of others. Practice the relaxing breathing meditation (see instructions below). Being mindful of our actions in order to protect those who are at-risk of great suffering from Covid-19. Cherishing those we are spending most of our time with. In Buddhism love is a verb. We cherish others by behaving in ways and doing things to make them happy or peaceful.  
    A Simple Breathing Meditation to Relax your Body and Mind
    Straighten your back comfortably. Rest your hands in the lap. Close your eyes. Breathe deeply from the diaphragm, feeling your stomach expand. Breathe out more slowly than you breathe in.  Count during your inhalation, starting at one. Count during your exhalation, also beginning at one and making sure your count is longer during the breath out. This way of breathing has a physiological effect of calming the body. Continue this breathing meditation until you feel peaceful in your body and mind.  Breath, enjoy and abide in this peacefulness. More experienced meditators can do this meditation for an extended period. Do it as long as you enjoy it. At the end of your meditation, breathe out slowly and say inwardly to yourself “calm” “relaxed”. Try to tune your body to these feelings...calm...relaxed.  Put a little smile on your face. Try to find joy in things.  
    Whenever you start feeling stressed, you can do this breathing meditation with your eyes open during your daily activities. Do it until you feel relaxed. This might take only a minute or it may take longer. You’ll get better at this calming technique with practice. With enough practice, eventually you can tame your mind and be calm all day. Ideally, meditate every morning to set the tone of your day to one of peace and calm.    
     
    References and Links
     
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 173-175.
     

    • 33 min
    5 Minute Breathing Meditation

    5 Minute Breathing Meditation

    • 4 min
    Episode 71 - Letting Go of Attachment

    Episode 71 - Letting Go of Attachment

    Attachment is defined as a mental affliction, which is a habit that robs causes us suffering. Attachment arises like this:
     
    We encounter something pleasant + inappropriate attention/exaggerating its good qualities = attachment arises (the feeling we can not be happy without it)
     
    Sometimes we are attached to people being different than they are, to being right, drugs, alcohol, or unhealthy food. In all these cases, it is not the person or object that makes us unhappy, but our attachment that causes us to suffer.
     
    What attachment is not:
    Letting go of attachment does not mean that we don’t own things, but that those things don’t own us. 
     
    Letting go of attachment doesn’t mean that we don’t have love others, but that we love them without attachment. 
     
    Longing gives rise to grief; 
    Longing gives rise to fear. 
    For someone released from longing 
    There is no grief; 
    And from where would come fear? (212) 
     
    Affection gives rise to grief; 
    Affection gives rise to fear. 
    For someone released from affection 
    There is no grief; 
    And from where would come fear? (213) 
     
    Infatuation gives rise to grief; 
    Infatuation gives rise to fear. 
    For someone released from infatuation
    There is no grief; And from where would come fear? (214) 
     
    Sensual craving gives rise to grief; 
    Sensual craving gives rise to fear. 
    For someone released from sensual craving There is no grief; 
    And from where would come fear? (215) 
     
    Craving gives rise to grief; 
    Craving gives rise to fear. 
    For someone released from craving 
    There is no grief; 
    And from where would come fear?
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
     
    References
     
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 56-57

    • 26 min
    Episode 70 - Don’t get entangled

    Episode 70 - Don’t get entangled

    It is so easy to get entangled with the pressures of work, family dramas, relationship issues etc. The body and mind are finely tuned to handle acute stress, but not the prolonged, daily stress we experience from these emotional entanglements. How then do we follow the Buddha’s advice, “Don’t get entangled with what you long for or dislike”? In this episode, we explore how we turn situations and people into things we long for or dislike. We can engage in a mindfulness practice to stop ourselves from getting stressed, angry or attached by reminding ourselves: “Don’t get entangled. It is empty.”
    Don’t get entangled 
    With what you long for or dislike.
    Not seeing what you long for is suffering;
    So also is seeing what you dislike. (210)* 
     
    Therefore, do not turn anything 
    Into something longed for, 
    For then it’s dreadful to lose. 
    Without longing or dislike, 
    No bonds exist.
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
    References
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 56.

    • 30 min
    Episode 69 - The Magical Practice of Taking and Giving

    Episode 69 - The Magical Practice of Taking and Giving

    The ancient meditation known as the ‘the magical practice of taking and giving’ is a profound method to:
     
    transform our suffering into a tool to help others purify our negative karma make our mind strong and resilient  develop universal compassion eventually attain enlightenment  
    In this episode, we learn how to do this practice formally, seated, as well as in daily life. This practice can be done with our eyes open, whenever we see someone suffering. It can help us make our own suffering meaningful and easier to bear, and even purify the karmic causes of it. 
     
    Practicing what one shouldn’t, 
    Not practicing what one should, 
    Having abandoned the goal, 
    Clinging to what is dear, 
    One comes to envy those who practice. (209)*
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
     
    References
     
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 56.
     

    • 39 min
    Episode 68 - How To Develop Love For All Beings

    Episode 68 - How To Develop Love For All Beings

    This episode is devoted to the meditation of loving-kindness, a profound method to develop love for all living beings. It creates immeasurable good karma, diminishes ill will toward others and creates the cause of our own enlightenment. Scientific research has also been done on the results of people practicing this meditation. 
    Research indicates these benefits:
    Increases positive emotions. One study showed that seven weeks of practicing the loving-kindness meditation increased multiple positive emotions including love, joy, contentment, gratitude, pride, hope, interest, amusement, and awe. Quiets your inner critic Strengthens capacity for empathy Decreases migraines Increases compassion  Slows the aging process. In another eye-opening study researchers found that women with experience in loving-kindness meditation had relatively longer telomere length (a biological marker of aging) when compared to age-matched controls. Loving-kindness Prayer Within the Meditation 
    May you be happy

    May you be well
    May your body and mind be at ease
    May all good fortune and successes in life come to you
    May you be healthy
    May you have all the wealth you need
    May your happiness increase day by day 
    May you never know a day of sadness
    May you experience the supreme happiness of enlightenment. 
     
    Verse 206-208 of The Dhammapada
    It’s good to see the noble ones; 
    Their company is always a delight. 
    Free from the sight of fools,
    One would constantly be happy.
     
    One who keeps company with fools
    Will grieve for a long, long time. 
    Living with fools is painful,
    As is living with foes.
    Living with the wise is delightful,
    Like relatives gathered together.
     
    Therefore:
    You should always follow a good, intelligent person
    Who is wise, insightful, learned,
    Committed to virtue, dutiful and noble, 
    As the moon follows the path of the stars. (208)
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
    References
    Abrahmson, L. 6 Amazing Benefits of Loving Kindness Meditation Backed by Science. Lifehack (blog post). Retrieved from https://www.lifehack.org/361244/6-amazing-benefits-loving-kindness-meditation-backed-science
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54-55.

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

Elke Kora ,

Sweet kind advice

Thankyou for your sweet kind advice with dashes of humour and humble humanness. Your way of teaching lights up the day.
Much appreciated Amanda Australia

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