291 episodes

Practical tips for leaders. Hosted by psychologist and founder of Leadership Today - Andrew Beveridge. Go to www.leadership.today for episodes and more information.

Leadership Today - Practical Tips For Leaders Andrew Beveridge

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 66 Ratings

Practical tips for leaders. Hosted by psychologist and founder of Leadership Today - Andrew Beveridge. Go to www.leadership.today for episodes and more information.

    Interview - Alexa Chilcutt - Executive Communication and Public Speaking

    Interview - Alexa Chilcutt - Executive Communication and Public Speaking

    Summary
    In this conversation, Dr. Alexa Chilcutt (www.linkedin.com/in/alexa-chilcutt-phd/) discusses the importance of executive communication and public speaking skills. She explains that anxiety around public speaking stems from the fear of being judged and evaluated. However, she emphasises that with practice and a clear process, individuals can become more confident and effective communicators. Dr. Chilcutt also provides tips for structuring a message, including identifying the purpose, understanding the audience, and breaking the information into three main points. Additionally, she highlights the significance of executive presence in career advancement and outlines the 10 characteristics of executive presence, which include confidence, communication ability, appearance, and values in action. In this conversation, Alexa Chilcutt and Andrew Beveridge discuss various aspects of leadership and communication. They explore topics such as executive presence, effective communication for technical professionals, and the challenges faced by women in leadership roles. Alexa emphasises the importance of intention and preparation in developing executive presence and highlights the need for technical professionals to simplify complex information for their audience. She also discusses the significance of leaders communicating directly with their teams and the broader organization. Finally, she addresses the challenges faced by women in leadership and the importance of empowering women to overcome imposter syndrome and advocate for themselves.
     
    Takeaways
    Anxiety around public speaking is common and stems from the fear of being judged and evaluated. However, with practice and a clear process, individuals can become more confident and effective communicators.
    When structuring a message, it is important to identify the purpose, understand the audience, and break the information into three main points. This helps to captivate the audience and increase memory retention.
    Executive presence is crucial for career advancement. It encompasses characteristics such as confidence, communication ability, appearance, and values in action. Building executive presence involves being self-aware, authentic, and aligning actions with values.
    To improve executive presence, individuals can ask for feedback, record themselves presenting, and focus on creating meaningful connections with the audience. Developing executive presence requires intention and preparation.
    Technical professionals should simplify complex information for their audience and use relatable language.
    Leaders should communicate directly with their teams and the broader organization to ensure effective communication.
    Women in leadership face challenges such as imposter syndrome and should be empowered to advocate for themselves.
     
    Chapters
    00:10 Introduction and Background
    01:19 Interest in Executive Communication
    05:09 Structuring a Message
    09:01 Finding Your Authentic Style
    11:38 Understanding the Audience
    14:21 Avoiding Imitation and Finding Your Own Style
    23:24 Characteristics of Executive Presence
    25:11 Self-Reflection Exercise
    27:10 Shifting Perceptions and Elevating Adjectives
    29:12 Communicating Complex Technical Information
    33:41 Effective Communication in Leadership
    36:28 Building Connections and Getting Accurate Information
    43:48 Challenges and Empowerment for Women in Leadership
    49:21 Creating a Supportive and Diverse Organisational Culture
    51:18 Connecting with Alexa Chilcutt
     
    References and Resources
    Dagley, G. R., & Gaskin, C. J. (2014). Understanding executive presence: Perspectives of business professionals. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 66(3), 197–211. https://doi.org/10.1037/cpb0000011
    Body Language Expert Explains How to Show Confidence | WIRED - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRJzvJ5XPQI
     
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    • 51 min
    How To Bend The Rules With Integrity

    How To Bend The Rules With Integrity

    Summary  Rules can be frustrating. It can be tempting to bend the rules or ignore them altogether, but this can lead to negative outcomes. This week we explore how to work around rules but maintain your integrity.
     
    Transcript Hello and welcome to episode 220 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we share practical tips to improve your leadership. This week we explore how to work around rules but maintain your integrity.
    Lapses in integrity have ended many leaders’ careers. Breaking the rules is never a good idea. But we often need to be creative and flexible to get things done. Blindly sticking to out of date rules can mean we miss opportunities. Organisations can become overrun with excessive bureaucracy if we don’t challenge the rules. Sometimes we need to bend the rules, change the rules, or work around them. But how do we do that with integrity?
    Research demonstrates that while rule-breakers may be seen as more dominant, they generally have less respect from others and are seen as having reduced leadership potential. The research also shows that rule-benders can be seen as having more leadership potential, but only in competitive situations. Generally, rule-abiders were viewed most positively in cooperative settings.
    So while bending the rules may work when we need to win against a competitor, we need to be careful bending the rules in most other settings. We also need to be careful about the example we set for others. If we bend the rules as a leader, we can expect those who follow us to do the same. This can lead to adverse outcomes if people bend rules without fully understanding the consequences.
    Here are five tips to help you bend the rules while maintaining integrity:
    Understand why the rules exist. Take the time to research why rules were put in place originally. Speak to those responsible for the rule and find out the history behind them. You might uncover specific reasons why the rule is in place, or you might find that the rule can be changed.
    Confirm the constraints. Sometimes rules are shared from person to person with slight variations. What someone might share as a steadfast rule might actually be quite different to the actual rule. Explore the constraints and where there might be flexibility.
    Get creative. Look for innovative ways to either work around the rule or reduce its impact on your work. Brainstorm with your team to come up with creative solutions.
    Get a second opinion. Before you take action, check in with someone else you respect to confirm your approach. 
    Inform others. You don’t want to be taking innovative action without letting others know. You don’t want to be seen as being deceptive or sneaky in your approach.
    And if you do discover a rule that no longer makes sense for your organisation, mount the case to have it removed. That will help others to be more effective as well.
     
    Research Rule benders make more appealing leaders than rule abiders - https://www.bps.org.uk/research-digest/rule-benders-make-more-appealing-leaders-rule-abiders
     
    Leadership Today On-Demand Special Offer We have a great deal for podcast listeners on our Leadership Today On-Demand subscription. Just go to www.leadershiptoday.com and checkout using the promo code PODCAST for 25% off an annual subscription. 
    Leadership Today On-Demand is a video subscription service that allows you to work on your leadership in your own time and at your own pace. It is available online and through our Apple iOS and Android apps for phones and tablets. Our mission is to help you to become an even better leader.
    Your subscription brings together all of our video content in one place including:
    - Five online courses with workbooks 
    - Five five day challenges with workbooks
    - Nineteen recorded webinars 
    - A searchable library of 170+ "how to" quick videos on a range of leadership challenges 
    That's over $4,500 of content for less than the price of a single online course. And t

    • 3 min
    How To Appear Less Nervous in Meetings and Interviews

    How To Appear Less Nervous in Meetings and Interviews

    Summary
    Interviewers place a strong emphasis on perceptions of nervousness. But there are practical steps we can take to appear less nervous in meetings and interviews.
     
    Transcript
    Hello and welcome to episode 219 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we share practical tips to improve your leadership. This week we work through ways to appear less nervous in meetings and interviews.
    Research demonstrates that anxious candidates perform worse at job interviews, even when their skills and experience align well with the role. Interviewers place an oversized importance to the appearance of anxiety when making judgements. And this tendency can extend to other important meetings.
    To avoid this, we might consider visible signs of nervousness such as shaky hands or nervous laughter. We might then focus on the use of our hands, slowing our speech or avoiding fidgeting. We can risk becoming overly sensitive to how our behaviours are coming across.
    However, In the research, the only consistent behavioural indicator of nervousness that the interviewers focused on was long pauses before responding to questions. This was potentially seen as the candidate being less prepared and less assertive than if they answered questions directly. Negative perceptions of anxiety in meetings and interviews was less about nervous signs, and more to do with perceptions of assertiveness and warmth as traits. Those who were perceived as less warm and less assertive were also rated as more anxious. Those who came across as friendly and assertive were seen as less anxious. It appears the overall impression we leave is far more important than any nervous tics that we might show.
    So what can we do to appear less nervous in meetings and interviews? To increase others’ perceptions of our warmth and assertiveness, you can try these techniques:
    Plan for first impressions. We want to demonstrate warmth from the very start of the meeting or interview. Research who will be there. Prepare and practice what you will do and say when you first arrive. Listen to others. When we’re nervous we can focus too much on ourselves and not enough on others. Demonstrate you’re listening by taking notes, restating their perspectives, and clarifying their views. Be prepared. There’s no substitute for preparation. It will help you to avoid lengthy pauses before responding. Remember to smile. When we’re nervous we can forget about our facial expressions, but they’re an important indicator of our confidence and friendliness. Video yourself. Have someone ask you some practice questions, and video your responses. This can help you to uncover unconscious signs of nervousness. Seek feedback. After the meeting or interview, explore how you came across. Ask about anything you could have done to appear more confident and engaged. We often feel more nervous than we appear. Focus on the overall impression of warmth and assertiveness that you give to others. Apply these tips in your next meeting or interview.
     
    Research
    Feiler, A.R., Powell, D.M. Behavioral Expression of Job Interview Anxiety. J Bus Psychol 31, 155–171 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10869-015-9403-z
     
    Leadership Today On-Demand Special Offer
    We have a great deal for podcast listeners on our Leadership Today On-Demand subscription. Just go to www.leadershiptoday.com and checkout using the promo code PODCAST for 25% off an annual subscription.
    Leadership Today On-Demand is a video subscription service that allows you to work on your leadership in your own time and at your own pace. It is available online and through our Apple iOS and Android apps for phones and tablets. Our mission is to help you to become an even better leader.
    Your subscription brings together all of our video content in one place including:
    - Five online courses with workbooks
    - Five five day challenges with workbooks
    - Nineteen recorded webinars
    - A searchable library of 170+ "how to" quick videos on a rang

    • 4 min
    How To Boost First Impressions on Zoom

    How To Boost First Impressions on Zoom

    Summary
    Research demonstrates the background we choose for video calls has a significant impact on how trustworthy and competent we appear. This week we explore how to boost your first impressions on a video call in three simple ways.
     
    Transcript
    Hello and welcome to episode 218 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we share practical tips to improve your leadership. This week we explore how to boost your first impressions on a video call in three simple ways.
    Your choice of background on a video call has a greater impact on how you’re perceived by others than you might expect. You might be tempted to choose a novelty background to communicate a sense of fun, or a home background to reflect that you’re not in the office. But there are risks with these choices.
    Selecting a novelty background or a simulated home background saw ratings of trustworthiness drop. Blurring a home background resulted in better ratings of trustworthiness for the person, but the best ratings were for a background with plants or a bookcase.
    The research also found that facial expressions, not surprisingly, also mattered. Happy faces were rated as more trustworthy than neutral or sad faces.
    Ratings of competence also varied by background, with bookcases, plants and blank walls leading to the highest ratings. Novelty backgrounds, home backgrounds, and blurred backgrounds saw lower ratings. Again, happy facial expressions resulted in more positive ratings of competence.
    Interestingly, women were seen as more trustworthy and more competent than men across all backgrounds in the experiment. Our gender impacts the first impressions we make on a video meeting. Men will likely benefit from additional efforts to demonstrate trustworthiness and competence during the meeting.
    Here are three simple ways to boost your first impressions on a video call:
    Keep backgrounds professional.  Avoid a home or novelty background when you can. Blurring a background is better, but choosing a virtual background with a bookcase or plants helps to boost first impressions. Demonstrate warmth. Smiling helps perceptions of both trustworthiness and competence. Try to maintain your interest in others on the call and keep your facial expressions positive and engaged. Build confidence in your competence. Research suggests it’s always best to start with warmth and build perceptions of your competence over time. Being helpful, responsive, on-time, and interested can all boost how confident you appear. Give these practical ideas a try on your next video call.
     
    Research - https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0291444
     
     
    Leadership Today On-Demand Special Offer
    We have a great deal for podcast listeners on our Leadership Today On-Demand subscription. Just go to www.leadershiptoday.com and checkout using the promo code PODCAST for 25% off an annual subscription.
    Leadership Today On-Demand is a video subscription service that allows you to work on your leadership in your own time and at your own pace. It is available online and through our Apple iOS and Android apps for phones and tablets. Our mission is to help you to become an even better leader.
    Your subscription brings together all of our video content in one place including:
    - Five online courses with workbooks
    - Five five day challenges with workbooks
    - Nineteen recorded webinars
    - A searchable library of 170+ "how to" quick videos on a range of leadership challenges
    That's over $4,500 of content for less than the price of a single online course. And there are more videos added each week.
     
    Get Connected
    Find out ways to get connected here: https://leadership.today/connect

    • 3 min
    How to Be More Real on Video Calls

    How to Be More Real on Video Calls

    Summary
    Research demonstrates a risk of detachment and reduced connection on video calls. This week we explore ways to be more real when we’re not meeting in-person.
     
    Transcript
    Hello and welcome to episode 217 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we share practical tips to improve your leadership. This week we look at how to be more real on video calls.
    We make rapid judgements about people based on visual and other information we receive. While this can lead to us making incorrect judgements when we meet people in-person, the risk is increased through video calls.
    Research demonstrates an increased risk that we treat a visual representation of someone as less real than if we meet them in-person. On a video call we can treat other people as abstract rather than real. This effect is likely increased on a call that has audio and video challenges.
    In experiments, participants viewed others as having fewer conscious feelings and less ability to make free choices than when meeting in-person.
    As a leader, this could make us seem detached and lacking empathy during the conversation. It can, in turn, lead us to give less ethical consideration to the person on the other end of the video call. Our decision making may lack the warmth, concern and consideration that we would normally provide. So what can we do about this?
    When making video calls, we need to be conscious of the risk of detachment and make conscious effort to see people as real human beings. Here are some tips to try:
    Connect as human beings first. Rather than just getting straight down to business, spend a few minutes enquiring about the other person, how they are, and what they have been doing. You might share something personal about yourself to enhance this connection. Ask open questions. When we treat people as an object rather than a person, we can tend to “talk at” people rather than “talk with” people. Asking open questions helps avoid this trap. Increase your ethical consideration. Explore the impact of any decisions you are making upon people. Great decisions are a combination of logic and emotion. Acknowledge the challenge. You might share this research with your team members. This will help everyone to manage the risk of detachment. Make the most of in-person opportunities. When you do meet together in-person, use this time to connect on a personal level. Save more administrative activities to video calls and don’t waste the time you have physically together. Give these tips a try on your next video call, and we can all become more real.
     
    Research summary - https://www.bps.org.uk/research-digest/medusa-effect
     
     
    Leadership Today On-Demand Special Offer
    We have a great deal for podcast listeners on our Leadership Today On-Demand subscription. Just go to www.leadershiptoday.com and checkout using the promo code PODCAST for 25% off an annual subscription.
    Leadership Today On-Demand is a video subscription service that allows you to work on your leadership in your own time and at your own pace. It is available online and through our Apple iOS and Android apps for phones and tablets. Our mission is to help you to become an even better leader.
    Your subscription brings together all of our video content in one place including:
    - Five online courses with workbooks
    - Five five day challenges with workbooks
    - Nineteen recorded webinars
    - A searchable library of 170+ "how to" quick videos on a range of leadership challenges
    That's over $4,500 of content for less than the price of a single online course. And there are more videos added each week.
     
    Get Connected
    Find out ways to get connected here: https://leadership.today/connect

    • 3 min
    How To Lead Through a Crisis

    How To Lead Through a Crisis

    Summary
    When you’re in leadership for long enough you discover that crises are inevitable. This week we look at five ideas to help you lead through a crisis.
     
    Transcript
    Hello and welcome to episode 216 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we share practical tips to improve your leadership. This week we look at five ideas to help you lead through a crisis.
    When you’re in leadership for long enough you discover that crises are inevitable. Whether it's a financial downturn, a global pandemic, or internal organisational challenges, we all need to navigate through uncertainties to ensure the survival and success of our teams and organisations. Here are some practical strategies backed by research on how to effectively lead through a crisis.
    Maintain Transparent Communication: Research suggests that leaders who communicate clearly and honestly during a crisis build trust and enhance team resilience. Sharing information about the situation, potential impacts, and the organisation's response plan helps employees feel informed and engaged. For example, during the COVID-19 pandemic, leaders like Microsoft's Satya Nadella held regular virtual town hall meetings to update employees on the company's response, addressing concerns and providing a sense of direction. Foster a Culture of Adaptability: In times of crisis, adaptability becomes a crucial trait for both leaders and their teams. Research suggests that organisations promoting adaptability are more likely to thrive during crises. Leaders can encourage a culture that embraces change and innovation, empowering employees to contribute ideas and solutions. Prioritise Employee Well-being: The well-being of employees is a cornerstone of effective crisis leadership. Research by Gallup indicates that companies focusing on employee well-being experience higher levels of employee engagement and productivity. Leaders must demonstrate empathy, provide emotional support, and implement practical measures to ensure the physical and mental well-being of their teams. Help Others See the Potential for Development. The times when I have learned the most have also been times of crisis. Fortunately I had leaders and others who encouraged me to focus on what I could learn through these tough times. That brought a sense of purpose and opportunity to what otherwise might have appeared to be entirely negative situations. Develop a Robust Crisis Response Plan: Having a well-defined crisis response plan is essential for leaders to navigate uncertainties efficiently. Leaders should proactively identify potential risks, develop response strategies, and regularly test and update their crisis plans to ensure relevance. You can build this into your regular business planning. Each year I look at risks across one year, five year, and ten year time horizons. This helps me to anticipate what might go wrong and have contingencies in place ready to go. Leading through a crisis demands a combination of strategic thinking, effective communication, and a focus on well-being. Crises present opportunities for growth and transformation when met with thoughtful, prepared and decisive leadership.
     
    Leadership Today On-Demand Special Offer
    We have a great deal for podcast listeners on our Leadership Today On-Demand subscription. Just go to www.learn.leadership.today and checkout using the promo code PODCAST for 25% off an annual subscription.
    Leadership Today On-Demand is a video subscription service that allows you to work on your leadership in your own time and at your own pace. It is available online and through our Apple iOS and Android apps for phones and tablets. Our mission is to help you to become an even better leader.
    Your subscription brings together all of our video content in one place including:
    - Five online courses with workbooks - valued at $250 each
    - Five five day challenges with workbooks - valued at $150 each
    - Nineteen recorded webinars - valued at $100 each
    - A searcha

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
66 Ratings

66 Ratings

Naomi_W ,

Well worth a listen

Insightful snippets of leadership wisdom and evidence-based advice all neatly packaged into a series of snazzy little podcasts. Great work Andrew!

erniemcd ,

Advice to take into the week

What I love about this podcast is it is short and sharp to listen to and brings a leadership challenge to take into the week which is practical and relevant. Thanks for sharing your insight Andrew Beveridge

Yurt1Oberon ,

Facilitator

Dear Andrew

I've just listened to your first podcast... and what a delight. Full of examples about where leaders can get tripped up and more importantly some really useful strategies to help us form new habits and move ahead on our leadership journey.

Good job! Thanks for sharing your smarts and for inspiring others.

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