8 episodes

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency hosts conversations and interviews with people in our community. We discuss current issues, address myths and common questions, and think about what we can do to best protect the public and support the safe delivery of health care in Australia.

Taking care Ahpra

    • Health & Fitness

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency hosts conversations and interviews with people in our community. We discuss current issues, address myths and common questions, and think about what we can do to best protect the public and support the safe delivery of health care in Australia.

    Dr Gerald Hickson on patient safety and high-risk practitioners

    Dr Gerald Hickson on patient safety and high-risk practitioners

    Dr Gerald B. Hickson, MD is from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he works in the Department of Pediatrics. There, he has worked there since 1982 in multiple capacities. Since 1990, Dr Hickson's research has focused on why families choose to file suit and how to identify and intervene with high-risk physicians and in 2003, he founded the Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy. Dr Hickson joins Susan Biggar in conversation about the patient safety movement and the important changes he has seen. They discuss how to best identify and intervene with high risk situations and the importance of open disclosure and feedback in achieving safer, more satisfactory outcomes. Dr Hickson talks about the 'culture of safety': how to promote it and how to address behaviours that undermine it. Listen to this important conversation that expands the scope of healthcare delivery beyond the practitioners to also include those receiving care, and their families.
    Please subscribe to Taking Care in your podcast player. You can find more information about Taking Care on the Ahpra website. If you have any feedback for the podcast, please email communications@ahpra.gov.au

    • 23 min
    Launching the National Scheme's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020-2025

    Launching the National Scheme's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020-2025

    In this episode, we listen to inaugural co-Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy Group, Professor Gregory Phillips and incoming co-Chair Karl Briscoe talk to Tash Miles. They discuss the importance and relevance of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020-2025 (the Strategy) in achieving cultural safety and Closing the Gap.
    The Strategy's vision is that 'Patient safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is the norm. We recognise that patient safety includes the inextricably linked elements of clinical and cultural safety, and that this link must be defined by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.' This will guide the work of the National Scheme and marks an important development in health regulation in Australia.
    In this episode we hear how the Strategy came to be, listen to stories of memorable moments in its development and what the future could hold in an environment of increased cultural safety in Australian healthcare. This important conversation also acknowledges the many people and organisations involved in developing and delivering the Strategy.

    • 28 min
    A new look at mandatory notifications

    A new look at mandatory notifications

    In early March 2020, amendments to the legislation on mandatory notifications came into effect. This presents a unique and important opportunity to talk about their impact on public safety and health practitioners. Susan Biggar and Tash Miles speak to Dr Andy Tagg, an emergency medicine physician, Dr Caroline Johnson, a GP and registrar support and progress coordinator, and Ms Kaye Frankcom, a clinical and counselling psychologist. Listen to them discuss what mandatory notifications mean for treating practitioners and their practitioner-patients. Most importantly, the guests emphasise the importance of all practitioners seeking help without fear of being reported, especially as the new amendments raise the threshold for when a mandatory notification is needed.

    • 22 min
    Ahpra's role in the health system

    Ahpra's role in the health system

    This episode of Taking Care is a conversation between Martin Fletcher, the CEO of Ahpra, and Tash Miles. They talk about what Ahpra and the National Boards can and cannot do under the National Scheme, as well as the importance of the many key players in a bigger health care system. Martin explains how the scheme helps to keep the public safe through its various roles and relationships. Martin highlights how the free public register of practitioners is there to help protect all Australians in health care, and how Ahpra is working to inform and engage with the public so that they access the register. We also hear Martin talk about the concerns that are raised about practitioners to Ahpra, how we manage those concerns and what the future of health regulation might look like to ensure it is effective, fair and trustworthy.

    • 28 min
    A view of mental health from both sides

    A view of mental health from both sides

    An interview with Kate Richards, award-winning author and medical researcher who trained as a doctor. As a student and trainee doctor, Kate experienced serious mental health issues, involving many hospital admissions and significant encounters with the health system while simultaneously training to provide that care to others. She talks about challenges for students and young trainee doctors, particularly those facing a health or mental health issue. From the patient perspective, she speaks of the vulnerabilities, power imbalance and serious obstacles that patients can face in their effort to access good, safe and humane health care. She also compares her profession as a writer with that of a doctor.

    • 32 min
    The practitioner experience of a notification

    The practitioner experience of a notification

    Dr Anne Tonkin, Chair of the Medical Board of Australia, reflects on Ahpra's videos featuring first-person accounts of what it is like to be the subject of a notification, or a complaint, from the perspective of a registered health practitioner. In a discussion with Susan Biggar, she talks about what the Medical Board and Ahpra can learn from these accounts of their notification experiences and what could be done to improve it for all people involved in the process. Dr Tonkin also talks about changes that are already happening and what they mean for practitioners and the public.

    • 14 min

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