33 episodes

Welcome to The ABR Podcast. Released every Wednesday, The ABR Podcast features a range of literary highlights, such as reviews, poetry, fiction, interviews, and commentary. Subscribe on iTunes, Google, or Spotify Podcasts, or whichever app you use to listen to your favourite podcasts.

For more information about ABR, visit our website, www.australianbookreview.com.au

The ABR Podcast The ABR Podcast

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

Welcome to The ABR Podcast. Released every Wednesday, The ABR Podcast features a range of literary highlights, such as reviews, poetry, fiction, interviews, and commentary. Subscribe on iTunes, Google, or Spotify Podcasts, or whichever app you use to listen to your favourite podcasts.

For more information about ABR, visit our website, www.australianbookreview.com.au

    In conversation with James Bradley about David Mitchell's 'Utopia Avenue'

    In conversation with James Bradley about David Mitchell's 'Utopia Avenue'

    In today's episode, author and critic James Bradley speaks to ABR's digital editor Jack Callil about David Mitchell's latest novel Utopia Avenue. Mitchell is perhaps best known for Cloud Atlas (2004), a work of sprawling interconnected narratives. In a similar vein, Utopia Avenue traces the lives of four band members during their rise to fame during the bustle of the 1960s. Yet as James Bradley details, the book is less concerned with history or music than with its own 'metaphysical game'.

    • 30 min
    'The Dolorimeter' by Kate Middleton

    'The Dolorimeter' by Kate Middleton

    The Calibre Essay Prize, now in its fourteenth year, goes on producing some of the finest longform essays from around the world. This year we received about 600 entries from 29 different countries. The overall prize went to Yves Rees for their essay 'Reading the Mess Backwards', which Yves reads in a recent podcast episode. Placed second was 'The Dolorimeter' by Sydney-based poet and academic Kate Middleton. Kate's essay, which appears in the September issue of ABR, is a personal meditation on her experience with illness and dealing with the medical profession over many years.

    • 32 min
    Poets Abroad – Victoria

    Poets Abroad – Victoria

    We continue our poetry podcasts with the first in a series of readings by poets living in a particular state. It complements in a way ABR’s old States of Poetry anthologies (all still available online). This time we’re inviting a number of poets to record a poem of theirs that is set outside their home state (whether interstate or overseas – or indeed in space, as you will hear). The poems can be published or unpublished ones. We list all the readers and poems on our website. Given the present lockdown in that state, we’re starting in Victoria. After all, if we can't leave home, we might as well do so imaginatively.

    • 49 min
    Recession speak: Amanda Laugesen on the language of financial crises

    Recession speak: Amanda Laugesen on the language of financial crises

    Amanda Laugesen, Director of the Australian National Dictionary Centre, reveals in today's episode how the national vocabulary has always been shaped by recession, depression, financial crises, and periods of high unemployment. A list to which we somberly might add the current pandemic.

    • 8 min
    'River Story' by Mykaela Saunders, winner of the 2020 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize

    'River Story' by Mykaela Saunders, winner of the 2020 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize

    In today's episode, listen to Mykaela Saunders read the entirety of her remarkable 'River Story', which won this year's ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize. Mykaela is a Koori writer, teacher, and community researcher. Of Dharug and Lebanese ancestry, she’s working-class and queer, and belongs to the Tweed Aboriginal community. Mykaela has worked in Aboriginal education since 2003, and her research explores trans-generational trauma and healing in her community.

    • 35 min
    Declan Fry on 'Fire Front: First Nations poetry and power today', edited by Alison Whittaker

    Declan Fry on 'Fire Front: First Nations poetry and power today', edited by Alison Whittaker

    Fire Front, edited by Gomeroi author and scholar Alison Whittaker, is an anthology of contemporary First Nations poetry. Featuring several eminent Australian writers – including Ellen van Neerven, Tony Birch, Alexis Wright, and many more – this collection serves as a testament to the contemporary renaissance of First Nations poetry. It is divided into five thematic sections, each introduced by an essay written by a prominent Aboriginal writer and thinker, such as Bruce Pascoe, Ali Cobby Eckermann, and Evelyn Araluen. In this episode, listen to Declan Fry discuss Fire Front before reading his review of the book.

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

Glenally ,

Insightful, and a delight

I loved this podcast, Garner is always a great subject, and this review was so well considered and put together. Thanks. I’m looking forward to more.

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