91 episodes

Conversations at the intersection of politics, religion, and culture: Commonweal Magazine editor Dominic Preziosi hosts The Commonweal Podcast, a regular compendium of in-depth interviews, discussions, and profiles presented by Commonweal’s editors and contributors.

The Commonweal Podcast Commonweal Magazine

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Conversations at the intersection of politics, religion, and culture: Commonweal Magazine editor Dominic Preziosi hosts The Commonweal Podcast, a regular compendium of in-depth interviews, discussions, and profiles presented by Commonweal’s editors and contributors.

    Ep. 69 - Violent Faith

    Ep. 69 - Violent Faith

    In 1940, a group of armed, anti-Semitic Catholic militants were arrested by the FBI in Brooklyn and charged with plotting to overthrow the U.S. government.

    All were members of the Christian Front, a radical rightwing group inspired by Catholic theology and galvanized by the preaching of notorious “radio priest” Fr. Charles Coughlin.

    On this episode, we speak with Charles Gallagher, a historian at Boston College and author of the new book The Nazis of Copley Square: The Forgotten Story of the Christian Front.
     
    Gallagher doesn’t just fill a major gap in our understanding of the history of Christian extremism. He tells a story about faith curdling into violence, one that holds important lessons for us today.

    For further reading:
    -      “On Anti-Semitism,” Jacques Maritain
    -      “Hitler’s Gospel,” John Connelly
    -      “From Trotsky to Soros,” James J. Sheehan

    • 34 min
    Ep. 68 - The Varieties of Religious Community Today

    Ep. 68 - The Varieties of Religious Community Today

    The November issue of Commonweal featured a special package of stories on Catholic religious communities in the broadest sense of the term, including religious orders, secular institutes, lay ecclesial movements, pious houses, and houses of hospitality.

    Despite the variety of communities surveyed, some key themes emerged: the difficulty of adapting to new circumstances, the relationship of community to place, and a sense of hope in the face of precariousness and uncertainty.

    On this special podcast episode, we’re joined by editors and writers—including Paul Elie and Kaya Oakes—who helped put that issue together.

    • 33 min
    Ep. 67 – A Hostile Climate

    Ep. 67 – A Hostile Climate

    Even as political leaders gather in Glasgow to discuss global solutions to climate change, why is it that the most basic facts of climate science still aren’t being taught in classrooms here at home?

    On this episode, Commonweal assistant managing editor Isa Simon speaks with Katie Worth, an investigative reporter and author of the forthcoming book Miseducation: How Climate Change Is Taught in America.
     
    The problem, as Worth sees it, is that climate change is too often framed as a “debate” rather than an established fact. Her reporting tells the story of how financial and political interests got us here, and what we can do to change it.

    • 32 min
    Ep. 66 - Beliefs Made Visible

    Ep. 66 - Beliefs Made Visible

    The murder of eleven Jews at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue three years ago in October 2018 was the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history.

    On this episode, journalist Mark Oppenheimer, author of the new book Squirrel Hill: The Tree of Life Synagogue Shooting and The Soul of a Neighborhood, joins Commonweal editor Dominic Preziosi for a wide-ranging discussion of the aftermath of that event.

    Oppenheimer focuses not on the shooting and the gunman, but rather on the century-old currents of Judaism in Pittsburgh, the variety of religious beliefs and practices visible after the attack, and the resilience of Squirrel Hill.

    For further reading:
    -      ‘Death at the Tree of Life,’ Wesley Hill
    -      ‘From Trotsky to Soros,’ James J. Sheehan
    -      ‘The Author and the Expert,’ Tzvi Novick

    • 28 min
    Ep. 65 - War Without End

    Ep. 65 - War Without End

    Six weeks after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, can we really say that America is no longer a country at war?

    On this episode, we’re featuring two reflections—one political, the other philosophical—on America’s “forever war.”

    Longtime Commonweal contributor and historian Andrew J. Bacevich explains the little-understood Carter Doctrine, and why it needs to go, while fiction writer and Marine Corps veteran Phil Klay asks whether war can ever be considered “humane.”

    Both are in conversation with Commonweal senior editor Matt Boudway.

    For further reading
    -      “The Forever War Continues,” Andrew J. Bacevich
    -      “Sops to Humanity,” Phil Klay
    -      “An Unwinnable War,” The Editors

    • 31 min
    Ep. 64 - Greener Pastures

    Ep. 64 - Greener Pastures

    Our modern food system and its reliance on industrial farming practices has caused considerable harm in rural communities, breaking up family farms and scarring the environment.
     
    That’s a shame, argues journalist Gracy Olmstead, because the legacy of these small farms, and the communities they nurture, could help make life in America fairer and more meaningful.

    On this episode, Olmstead joins Commonweal managing editor Katie Daniels for a wide-ranging discussion of her recent book, Uprooted: Recovering the Legacy of Places We’ve Left Behind.  

    For further reading
    ·     Yours, Mine, or Ours, by Gracy Olmstead
    ·     How Progressives Can Win in Rural America, by Luke Mayville
    ·     Seams of Resentment, by Danny R. Kuhn

    • 29 min

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