65 episodes

Conversations at the intersection of politics, religion, and culture: Commonweal Magazine editor Dominic Preziosi hosts The Commonweal Podcast, a regular compendium of in-depth interviews, discussions, and profiles presented by Commonweal’s editors and contributors.

The Commonweal Podcast Commonweal Magazine

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    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Conversations at the intersection of politics, religion, and culture: Commonweal Magazine editor Dominic Preziosi hosts The Commonweal Podcast, a regular compendium of in-depth interviews, discussions, and profiles presented by Commonweal’s editors and contributors.

    Ep. 43 - The Election & Social Catholicism

    Ep. 43 - The Election & Social Catholicism

    We are at a perilous moment in American history, and public Catholicism must rise to the task.

    So says E. J. Dionne Jr., Washington Post columnist and Commonweal contributor.
     
    He joins Commonweal editor Dominic Preziosi to discuss why American Catholicism needs to put aside culture-war rhetoric and return to its rich tradition of social thought—characterized by what he calls “radical moderation”—and how such ideas could play out in the upcoming election and beyond.
     
    Suggestions for further reading:
    ·     Radical, Moderate, and Necessary, E.J. Dionne Jr.
    ·     The Faith of Amy Coney Barrett, Matthew Sitman
    ·     Canons & the Candidate, Nicholas P. Cafardi

    • 29 min
    Ep. 42 - Killing Machines

    Ep. 42 - Killing Machines

    Modern warfare has become an intensely scattered, depersonalized affair. Violence still rages and traumas proliferate, but often remotely, the carnage hidden from public view. So what’s the best way to write about it? How to convey the horror of armed conflict today?

    Few writers do that as well as Phil Klay, who won the National Book Award for his 2014 short story collection, Redeployment, which is based on his experiences as a marine during the Iraq War. His debut novel, Missionaries, expands those insights through the interlocking stories of four characters living in Colombia, Yemen, and the United States.

    In conversation with Commonweal critic Anthony Domestico, Klay shares insights into the ways that globalization, capitalism, and technological advances have made warfare both more deadly and less noticeable. A committed Catholic, Klay also discusses the sacramental worldview that undergirds his fiction, in which even death is “charged with the grandeur of God.”

    • 29 min
    Ep. 41 - White Churches & White Supremacy

    Ep. 41 - White Churches & White Supremacy

    For years, Black churches have worked tirelessly to advance the cause of racial justice in America. In many ways, their white counterparts have done the opposite.

    White Christians are not simply complicit in racism and white supremacy, argues scholar Robert P. Jones. They’re actually culpable. Without their deliberate consent, white supremacy in America could never have been built.

    That’s a shocking assertion. But citing historical evidence and contemporary survey data, Jones, in conversation with assistant editor Regina Munch, maps the long road white Christians must travel if they hope to ever atone for their sins.

    • 26 min
    Ep. 40 - El Paso: One Year Later (Part 2)

    Ep. 40 - El Paso: One Year Later (Part 2)

    On August third one year ago, a 21-year-old white man from Allen, Texas, drove across the state to a Wal-Mart in El Paso, alongside the Mexican border, where he shot and killed 23 people and injured 23 others, the majority of them Mexican and Mexican-Americans. 

    The El Paso matanza, or massacre, is considered to be the deadliest anti-Latino attack in U.S. history, and one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history.

    On this two-part episode, we talk with several people from El Paso about that day, about what has transpired in the year that has passed, about how life has and hasn’t changed along the border—politically, culturally, and spiritually.

    In part two, we’re joined by Dylan Corbett and Marisa Limón Garza of the Hope Border Institute in El Paso, and by Bishop Mark Seitz of the El Paso Diocese.

    For further reading:


    Night Will Be No More, Bishop Mark Seitz


    Confronting White Supremacy, John Gehring


    Injustice at the Border, a collection of Commonweal pieces


    Links:

    The Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States

    Hope Border Institute

    Black Catholic Theological Symposium

    • 36 min
    Ep. 39 - El Paso: One Year Later

    Ep. 39 - El Paso: One Year Later

    On August third one year ago, a 21-year-old white man from Allen, Texas, drove across the state to a Wal-Mart in El Paso, alongside the Mexican border, where he shot and killed 23 people and injured 23 others, the majority of them Mexican and Mexican-Americans. 

    The El Paso matanza, or massacre, is considered to be the deadliest anti-Latino attack in U.S. history, and one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history.

    On this two-part episode, we talk with several people from El Paso about that day, about what has transpired in the year that has passed, about how life has and hasn’t changed along the border—politically, culturally, and spiritually.

    In part one, we’re joined by Monsignor Arturo Bañuelas, a priest in the diocese of El Paso, and Professor Neomi DeAnda, the current president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States. Look for part two soon.

    For further reading:


    Night Will Be No More, Bishop Mark Seitz


    Confronting White Supremacy, John Gehring


    Injustice at the Border, a collection of Commonweal pieces


    Links:

    The Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States

    Hope Border Institute

    Black Catholic Theological Symposium

    • 34 min
    Ep. 38 – A ‘Form for Failure’

    Ep. 38 – A ‘Form for Failure’

    While we may experience moments of clarity and insight in our spiritual lives, more often we face struggles as we try to shed old habits and find new ways of thinking about God.

    On this episode, poet Christian Wiman joins us to read and discuss several poems from his new collection, Survival Is a Style. He also shares insights he’s gleaned from his own grappling with faith and doubt, explaining how poetry not only delights us, but helps us become free.

    For further reading:
    ·     ‘Eight Distillations,” Christian Wiman
    ·     Issues of Blood, Christian Wiman
    ·     Goaded by Doubt, Paul K. Johnston

    • 33 min

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