61 episodes

National Chief Perry Bellegarde leads discussions on important issues from a First Nations perspective

Ahkameyimok Podcast with Perry Bellegarde Perry Bellegarde, former National Chief, Assembly of First Nations

    • Government
    • 4.9 • 36 Ratings

National Chief Perry Bellegarde leads discussions on important issues from a First Nations perspective

    Kevin Hearn of the Barenaked Ladies - Norval Morrisseau Documentary

    Kevin Hearn of the Barenaked Ladies - Norval Morrisseau Documentary

    "I just wanted to buy a painting, really."
    Kevin Hearn of the Barenaked Ladies is our guest on this episode of #Ahkameyimok. He and Perry talk about his new documentary, "There Are No Fakes," which exposes a massive art forgery ring surrounding the work of legendary Ojibwe painter, Norval Morrisseau.
    When the Barenaked Ladies started producing chart topping, international hit songs in the late '90's, Kevin Hearn decided he could now afford to buy a painting by his favourite artist, Norval Morrisseau, whose abstract works of Indigenous inspired woodland scenes are celebrated in galleries around the world. Little did Hearn know that that purchase, which turned out to be a fake, would draw him into a bizarre, dangerous and heartbreaking world of art fraud that is destroying the legacy of one of Canada's greatest artists.
    The documentary "There Are No Fakes," tells Hearns story. It was featured at HotDocs in Toronto and is now available to watch for free on TV Ontario at TVO.org
    The Ahkameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions.
    Our theme music is by the Red Dog Singers from Treaty 4 Territory in southern Saskatchewan.
     
     

    • 29 min
    What Brings You Hope?

    What Brings You Hope?

    As National Chief, Perry Bellegarde has always focused on the importance hope: "Always leave more hope in a room than was there when you arrived."
    Over the 57 episodes of the Ahkameyimok Podcast, no matter how difficult the conversation or the issue, he always ends by asking his guests this question:
    What brings you hope?
    As his time as National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations comes to an end, after choosing not to seek re-election, we are looking back at some of his favorite answers to that question about hope.
    They are inspiring, thought provoking and speak to a better future for First Nations.
    01: 18 -- Chief Willie Littlechild - former TRC Commissioner, Member of Parliament, lawyer, social activist and author of the first draft of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
    02:24 Dr Lorna Williams - Canada's leading expert on the promotion and revival of Indigenous languages.
    4:14 William Prince - Award winning and chart topping country music star
    6:30 Rt Hon Brian Mulroney - Canada's 18th Prime Minister
    7:40 Dr Dan Longboat - Founding Director of Trent University's Indigenous Environmental Science Program
    10:42 Marion Crowe - CEO of the First Nations Health Managers Association
    11:41 Wade Davis, best-selling author, film-maker, explorer, UBC Anthropology Professor
    12:32 Mary Ellen Turpel Lafond - fmr judge, law professor, children's advocate
    14:27 Jagmeet Singh - Leader of the federal New Democratic Party of Canada
    15:13 Bobbie Jo Greenland-Morgan - Grand Chief of the Gwich'in Tribal Council
    17:40 Kevin Loring - Artistic Director of the Indigenous Theatre, National Arts Centre, Ottawa
    19:40 Elder Wilfred Buck - leading First Nations astronomy and star lore expert
    21:52 Senator Kim Pate - international expert in legal and prison reform
    24:01 Brigadier-General Joe Paul, the highest ranking First Nations officer in the Canadian Armed Forces
    25:12 Brad Regehr - The first First Nations President of the Canadian Bar Association
    26:21 Louise Bernice Halfe - Canada's first Indigenous Parliamentary Poet Laureate
    28:05 Dr Alika Lafontaine - the first Indigenous person elected as the President of the Canadian Medical Association
    30:03 Romeo Saganash, former Member of Parliament, and leading advocate for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
    31:41 Conner Roulette, First Nations gold medal winning junior hockey star
    33:09 Chief Cadmus Delorme, Cowessess First Nation, home to 751 unmarked graves found at the Marieval Residential School
    34:30 Tom Jackson, actor, musician, social activist
    36:36 Marie Wilson, former Commissioner, Truth and Reconciliation Commission
    The Akhameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions
    Theme music is by the Red Dog Singers, Treaty 4 territory, Saskatchewan
    For more on the work of the Assembly of First Nations, visit AFN.ca
     

    • 39 min
    751 UNMARKED GRAVES - MARIEVAL RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL

    751 UNMARKED GRAVES - MARIEVAL RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL

    On this Canada Day, a special episode on the devastating and ongoing impact of the Residential School system. The shocking find of 751 unmarked graves at the site of the former Marieval Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan is another heartbreaking validation of survivor accounts of the horrifying abuse and neglect Indigenous children endured at these government funded, church run institutions, whose main aim was wiping out Indigenous culture and identity. Nowhere has the heartbreak been felt stronger than in the Cowessess First Nation, where Marieval operated from 1898 to 1996. Cadmus Delorme is the Chief of the Cowessess First Nation and joins Ahkameyimok to describe what it was like finding so many graves, how they were found, the impact on the community, what needs to be done to begin healing, what justice looks like for the children buried there and what advice he has for other First Nations searching for children who died or were killed at Residential Schools.
    ***The Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line is available 24-hours a day for anyone experiencing pain or distress as a result of his or her Residential school experience. 1-866-925-4419***
    For more on the work of the Assembly of First Nations, please visit AFN.ca
    The Ahkameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions.
    Our theme music is provided by the Red Dog Singers from Treaty 4 Territory in Saskatchewan.
     

    • 24 min
    Ron Ignace: First Indigenous Languages Commissioner

    Ron Ignace: First Indigenous Languages Commissioner

    "For those of us who are survivors of the oppression of our languages and the part of the cultural and physical genocide brought on us by the Church and State that ran Residential Schools... the day the that Bill C-91, the Indigenous Languages Act, received Royal Assent was a memorable occasion that was long overdue."
    This week, Ron Ignace was appointed as Canada's first ever Indigenous Languages Commissioner. He joins the Ahkameyimok Podcast to talk about his new job, what he hopes to achieve, success stories in the revitalization of Indigenous languages, his experiences at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, and how he was able to keep his Secwepemctsin language despite efforts to beat it out of him at that school.
    Stsmél̓qen, Ron Ignace, is a member of the Secwepemc Nation in British Columbia and a fluent speaker of Secwepemctsin. He was the elected chief of the Skeetchestn Indian Band for more than 30 years. He has a PhD in Anthropology from Simon Fraser University with a dissertation on Secwepemc oral history. From 2016-2021, he co-chaired the Assembly of First Nations' Chiefs Committee on Languages, where he played an instrumental role in the development and passage of Bill C-91, the Indigenous Languages Act.
    For more on the Assembly of First Nations work on Indigenous Languages and other issues, visit AFN.ca
    The Ahkameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions.
    Our theme music, Intertribal, is by the Red Dog Singers, Treaty 4 Territory in southern Saskatchewan.
     
     

    • 36 min
    John Milloy: Residential Schools - A National Crime

    John Milloy: Residential Schools - A National Crime

    "The Feds founded the first three federal residential schools in 1883 in Alberta and Saskatchewan. First Nations people formed the majority of the population and were power brokers in that area and one of the ways to deal with them was treaties, the other way to deal with them was to take their children hostages."
    John Milloy's award winning book, "A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System," used ground breaking research into government archives to expose the planned genocide of First Nations people at the heart of the residential school system. It has been described as one of the 100 most important Canadian books ever written.
    In the wake of the 215 unmarked graves of First Nations children found at the the Kamloops Indian Residential School, Milloy discusses the reasons for the birth of the Residential Schools as a tool to oppression, why it was so brutal, why it continued for so long, and why Canadians continue to be surprised by the horrors of that system, despite repeated high profile exposures of that system over the last 25 years.

    John Milloy is professor emeritus in the departments of Native Studies and History at Trent University.
    The Ahkameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions in Ottawa.
    Our theme music is performed by the Red Dog Singers of Treaty Four Territory in Saskatchewan.
     

    • 33 min
    Marie Wilson: The Mass Grave at Kamloops Residential School

    Marie Wilson: The Mass Grave at Kamloops Residential School

    ***The subject matter and content of this episode may not be suitable for all listeners***
    "We did hear of children's bones being found in the foundations of buildings when (Residential) schools were dismantled. We heard of children being thrown into furnaces. These were children. The little ones who have woken up in Kamloops this week, these are children calling out to all of us now."
    Marie Wilson, former Commissioner on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which investigated crimes and abuses against Indigenous children at Residential Schools in Canada, joins the Ahkameyimok Podcast from Yellowknife to discuss the shocking find of a mass grave of 215 children at the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The grave was found on the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School at the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation in British Columbia. Dr Wilson discusses her feelings on hearing of the the Kamloops mass grave, her memories of visiting that site as Commissioner, why her work on the TRC from 2009 to 2015 means she is shocked but not surprised by this mass grave and believes there are many more like it across Canada that need to be investigated, and why she believes the Pope and Catholic church, which ran the majority of the Residential Schools, needs to apologize for its role in what the TRC described as cultural genocide.
    National Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line: 1-866-925-4419
    For more on Residential Schools and the work of the Assembly of First Nations, please visit AFN.ca
    The Ahkameyimok Podcast is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions
    Our theme music is performed by the Red Dog Singers.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
36 Ratings

36 Ratings

Review guy other ,

Great format and discussions

Great conversations captured in podcast ... learning about some great perspectives I’d likely not otherwise be exposed to without searching. 👍🏻👍🏻

Looking@theStars ,

Ekosani National Chief

Listened to 1-6 podcasts so far. The quality, timeliness, focus, feel (I can hear you speaking from the heart) and wisdom of this podcast is amazing. I truly appreciate hearing from the guests and directly from the National Chief.

Thanks for making space for FNMI voices!

Listening helps me feel connected.

I hope the podcast continues beyond COVID-19. First podcast was my favourite 😳. We are ALL connected.

Mainstream media, take note.

NSFNW ,

So informative

Thank you National Chief for always keeping us informed and updated. You are a great leader!

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