22 episodes

Experts shape our world. Sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. In every big story, you’ll find one; you’ll find a researcher, scientist, engineer, planner, policy wonk, data nerd, bureaucrat, regulator, intellectual, or pseudo-intellectual. Their ideas are often opaque, unrecognized, and difficult to understand. Some of them like it that way. On Cited, we reveal their hidden stories.

Cited Cited Media

    • News
    • 4.9 • 80 Ratings

Experts shape our world. Sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. In every big story, you’ll find one; you’ll find a researcher, scientist, engineer, planner, policy wonk, data nerd, bureaucrat, regulator, intellectual, or pseudo-intellectual. Their ideas are often opaque, unrecognized, and difficult to understand. Some of them like it that way. On Cited, we reveal their hidden stories.

    #9: America’s Chernobyl (2 of 2)

    #9: America’s Chernobyl (2 of 2)

    Hanford is the most-polluted place in America. On our last episode, you heard about the nuclear plant’s largely-forgotten history–how it poisoned the people living downwind. On our season finale: a nuclear safety auditor tries to get it shut down, the downwinders struggle for justice, and we take you into the plant itself. The story of Hanford reveals that expertise is always a political battle, and never as straightforward as simply collecting facts–whether it’s executives putting profit over a safety auditor’s well-documented warnings, a community-based research pitted against government-backed studies, or turning a world-changing nuclear reactor into a dull scientific lecture.

    ———-MORE———-

    You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Nicole Yakashiro, including: a detailed Hanford timeline, as well as the colonial history of the Hanford site. Plus, a transcript.

    ———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

    Sadly, this is the last episode of our season! We’ll be back in Spring 2021, but we’ll be launching a new show in the meantime. You’ll find the first few episodes in this feed, so stay subscribed. The best way to stay abreast of our plans for our new season is to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. You’ll hear about it there first. Plus, while you’re waiting, you might want to check out some of the other stuff that our team makes. Like Crackdown, a podcast about the drug war, covered by drug users as war correspondents.

    ———-FEEDBACK———

    How did you like the season? Which was your favourite episode, which was your least favourite episode? What should we do next? Let us know! Email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

    ———-CREDITS———

    This episode was produced Gordon Katic and Polly Leger. With editing support from Acey Rowe. Nicole Yakashiro was our research assistant, and Aurora Tejeida was our fact-checker.

    Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

    We’d like to thank historian Sarah Fox author of “Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West,” as well as Kate Brown, author of “Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters.

    • 57 min
    #8: America’s Chernobyl (1 of 2)

    #8: America’s Chernobyl (1 of 2)

    Richland, Washington is a company town that sprang up almost overnight in the desert of South Eastern Washington. Its employer is the federal government, and its product is plutonium. The Hanford nuclear site was one of the Manhattan Project sites, and it made the plutonium for the bomb that devastated Nagasaki. Here, the official history is one of scientific achievement, comfortable houses, and good-paying jobs. But it doesn’t include the story of what happened after the bomb was dropped — neither in Japan, nor right there in Washington State. On part one of our two-part season finale, we tell the largely-forgotten story of the most toxic place in America.

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    You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Nicole Yakashiro, including: a detailed Hanford timeline, as well as the colonial history of the Hanford site. Plus, a transcript.

    ———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

    Yes, Cited has an album. Our brilliant composer Mike Barber put it together, and you can find it on his website and on Bandcamp. Check it out.

    Plus, we have branded mugs. And we’re doing a very simple giveaway. Write a review of Cited on Stitcher or Apple Podcasts, and then email me us a photo to info@citedmedia.ca. We’ll randomly pick three of the people who email, and send you a free mug.

    ———-FOLLOW CITED———

    To keep up with Cited, Secondary Symptoms, and our upcoming show: follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

    ———-CREDITS———-

    This episode was produced Gordon Katic and Polly Leger. With editing support from Acey Rowe. Nicole Yakashiro was our research assistant, and Aurora Tejeida was our fact-checker.

    Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

    We’d like to thank historians Sarah Fox, author of “Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West,” as well as Kate Brown, author of “Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters.” Check those out,

    • 50 min
    Secondary Symptoms #8: “Return to Normalcy”

    Secondary Symptoms #8: “Return to Normalcy”

    The phrase “return to normalcy” has been thrown around a lot lately. It’s actually a phrase that was popularized in 1920, in the wake of the WW1 and the Spanish Flu. But, as with the Spanish Flu, “returning to normalcy” means forgetting the conditions that brought us COVID-19, and perhaps even forgetting COVID-19 itself. On this last episode of Secondary Symptoms, we focus on the politics of pandemic memory. We’re still in the thick of it, but many already seem like they want us to forget; yet, we will never forget.

    Gordon Katic talks to Andrew Stoeten (11:00), baseball writer at the Athletic and co-host of the Birds all Day podcast, about baseball’s dubious return plans. MLB’s commissioner claims the game will help us “return to normalcy,” but — with piped-in crowd noise and cardboard cut-out fans — there is nothing normal about these games. Next, historian Nancy Bristow (23:07) talks about her book, American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influence Epidemic. She explains why officials wanted the public to forget the epidemic, even while it was still happening. However, Nancy also argues that regular people simply couldn’t forget. In that spirit, we ask a number of folks one simple question: what will you remember about COVID-19? Finally, even though there are no memorials to the Spanish Flu, it is memorialized in one place: the blues. To close out the show, Mike Rugel (56:33) from the podcast Uncensored History of the Blues, plays us a few classic songs of pandemics and disease.

    ———-MORE———-

    UPDATE: Since speaking with Andrew Stoeten, MLB’s Miami Marlins have suffered a coronavirus outbreak. A number of games have been postponed, and many are wondering if the season may already be in jeopardy—less than one week after beginning.

    To read more about Harding’s “return to normalcy,” check out the article by historian William Deverell in the Smithsonian Magazine.  

    Also, check out our Spotify Playlist to hear the songs in full. They were: Jesus is Coming Soon, by Blind Willie Johnson; Memphis Flu, by Elder Curry; the 1919 Influenza Blues, by Essie Jenkins; Dyin’ Flu, by Albert Collins; and Don’t Let the Corona Get on Ya, by Deacon Otis Wicknine.

    ———-PROGRAMING NOTE———-

    This is the last episode of Secondary Symptoms. Don’t fear, though; we’ll be bringing it back as a new, standalone show. The new show will be here in a month or two, and you’ll see the first few episodes in this feed.  

    To keep up with Cited, Secondary Symptoms, and our upcoming show: follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

    ———-CREDITS———-

    This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and a href="https://twitter.com/gordonkatic?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eautho...

    • 1 hr 16 min
    The Heroin Clinic (Rebroadcast)

    The Heroin Clinic (Rebroadcast)

    At Crosstown Clinic, doctors are turning addiction treatment on its head: they’re prescribing heroin-users the very drug they’re addicted to. This is the story of one clinic’s quest to remove the harms of addiction, without removing the addiction itself.

    ———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

    This is one of the best episodes in our archive. It was broadcast March 9th, 2017, and was honoured with a 2017 Jack Webster Foundation award for excellence in feature reporting in radio. The Jack Webster Awards are BC’s most prestigious journalism awards.

    Our next original documentary will be out next week.

    The Heroin Clinic was made in partnership with the Vancouver newspaper The Georgia Straight and the podcast Life of the Law. Check out the companion piece we produced with Travis here.

    ———-MORE———-

    If you want to hear more stories about the drug war, check out our other podcast Crackdown. Recently, Crackdown produced an episode commemorating longtime Vancouver drug user activist, Dave Murrary. Dave is pretty much the only reason this heroin clinic ever took off, and his story is chronicled in more detail on Crackdown.

    ———-FOLLOW CITED———-

    To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show. 

    ———-CREDITS———-

    This radio documentary was produced by Gordon Katic, Sam Fenn, Alex Kim, and Travis Lupick. With editing from Nancy Mulane.

    We’d like to thank Life of the Law for their editorial support, Dan Reist for academic mentorship, Josh GD for editorial input, as well as Lauryn Rohde and Jenn Luu for research and marketing help.

    Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

    Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

    • 47 min
    Secondary Symptoms #7: Medical Imaginaries

    Secondary Symptoms #7: Medical Imaginaries

    Our whirlwind tour of the pharmaceutical industry ends this week. We’ve shown you the dysfunction, now we look for a better way. For some reason, the political vision is so curtailed here. Where is the manifesto for a new system? Even on the Bernie wing of the left, much of the focus is on negotiating better prices and importing pharmaceuticals from other countries. Today, we look at ways we can fundamentally change the industry, and medicine itself. 

    On this episode of Secondary Symptoms, Gordon Katic interviews economist Dean Baker on his simple idea for how to overhaul the dysfunctional pharmaceutical industry: change the patent system. Then, Jayasree K. Iyer of the Access to Medicine Foundation reminds us that other viral infections — HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria — will surge because of COVID-related disruptions. Finally, we end with Cambridge philosopher Jacob Stegenga. His polemical book Medical Nihilism speaks to the limits of medicine. Perhaps the simple but more overlooked interventions — access to good food, clean air, healthy neighbourhoods —  may offer more than the elusive ‘magic bullets’ of medicine.  

    ———-MORE———-

    This episode is meant to accompany a wider series that we are doing this season about COVID-19 and the pharmaceutical industry. If you are interested in this episode of Secondary Symptoms, you would certainly be interested in a recent Cited documentary: the Tamiflu Trials. You can find it in this feed. 

    You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, on topics like: industry funding of patient advocacy groups, the meaning (and limitations) of ‘evidence-based medicine,’ and the broader research literature on industry funding and why it’s a problem. 

    ———-FOLLOW CITED———-

    To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show. 

    ———-CREDITS———-

    This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant.

    Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn/...

    • 53 min
    #7: The Poison Paradigm

    #7: The Poison Paradigm

    On a daily basis, we are exposed to thousands of toxic chemicals. This is no accident; it is by design. They are everywhere – coating our consumer products, in our food packaging, being dumped into our lakes and sewers, and in countless other places. However, for the most part, regulators say that we need not worry.

    That assessment is based on a simple 500-year-old adage, “the dose makes the poison.” The logic is simple: anything is poisonous, depending on how large a dose.  Dosing yourself with a minuscule amount of lead will cause no harm; while drinking an enormous amount of water will kill you. Regulators then try to find safe exposure levels for these chemicals—and they assume a simple, direct relationship (less is fine, more is worse). So, no matter how toxic the chemical, you only need to worry if it passes a certain exposure threshold.

    However, what if their approach is all wrong? A revolutionary group of scientists are challenging this 500-year-old paradigm. They argue that some chemicals behave in erratic and unpredictable ways, and they can mess with us even at minuscule doses. If they’re right, then the chemicals around us are causing irreparable harm, and everything must change. We sort out this battle of paradigms through the lens of one of their most-hated chemicals, BPA.

    ———-MORE———-

    You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, including: a detailed overview of the two paradigms, the low-down on CLARITY-BPA, and a description of how policies are changing in the EU. Plus, a transcript.

    ———-FOLLOW CITED———-

    To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca.

    ———-CREDITS———-

    This episode was produced by Irina Zhorov. Editing from Acey Rowe and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant, with fact checking from Polly Leger.

    Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

    Special thanks to the scientists who helped us understand this story, including: Laura Vandenberg, Daniel Dietrich, Rich Giovane and Savannah Johnson.

    This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. It’s part of a larger project that examines the roles of values in science, lead by Professor Gunilla Oberg at the University of British Columbia. Professor Oberg also provided research guidance to the project, though this episode does not necessarily reflect the view of Professor Oberg or her project

    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
80 Ratings

80 Ratings

z.pie. ,

Great Content!

No ads, great content and Canadian stories: ReJoice!

Grmdgs ,

Great quality and interesting

This is a consistently entertaining and valuable podcast. Love when it turns up in my feed.

Prof M^2 ,

Gold Star Podcast

Cited’s podcasts present well-researched storytelling in an engaging way. These podcasts are crafted to capture the authentic voices of the people at the heart of the stories. Gordon is a great interviewer. The topics are relevant to issues of today, but presented through unique, and sometimes unexpected, stories. Well worth subscribing.

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