21 episodes

In the practice of law, small changes can have a big impact. In ‘Matters’, each episode focuses on one discipline, learning, or lesson for law firms looking to break free of the status quo and transform the practice of law, for good. With actionable advice from practicing attorneys, law firm leaders, and subject matter experts from the worlds of law and business, Matters helps lawyers and legal professionals alike put new strategies and tactics into place that will dramatically impact their law firms. Matters is a monthly podcast presented by Clio, the world’s leading cloud-based legal technology provider.

Matters: A podcast from Clio Clio

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 15 Ratings

In the practice of law, small changes can have a big impact. In ‘Matters’, each episode focuses on one discipline, learning, or lesson for law firms looking to break free of the status quo and transform the practice of law, for good. With actionable advice from practicing attorneys, law firm leaders, and subject matter experts from the worlds of law and business, Matters helps lawyers and legal professionals alike put new strategies and tactics into place that will dramatically impact their law firms. Matters is a monthly podcast presented by Clio, the world’s leading cloud-based legal technology provider.

    Lawyer-Centered vs. Client-Centered

    Lawyer-Centered vs. Client-Centered

    So far this season, we've introduced the concept of client-centered legal practice, explored why lawyers tend to be so resistant to change, and looked at what's broken within our legal system. On this episode, we'll compare the broken model of legal service delivery—the "lawyer-centered" model—with the client-centered model, which is advantageous for both your clients and your firm.
    Featuring interviews with three practicing attorneys who are all innovating in their fields, this episode covers:

    The core differences between the lawyer-centered and client-centered models of legal service delivery

    The disadvantages of the lawyer-centered model

    The advantages of the client-centered model

    The effects that these different models have on lawyers and clients

    What it's like to operate a client-centered law firm, in practice

    Episode Four's guests include Kim Bennett, Founder of K Bennett Law LLC; Erin Levine, CEO & Founder of Hello Divorce and Managing Attorney at Levine Family Law Group; and Justin Osborn, Partner at Osborn Gambale Beckley & Budd PLLC. Listen in for their perspectives!
    Our Guests:
    Kimberly Bennett
    Kimberly Y. Bennett, Esq., is the Founder of K Bennett Law LLC, a boutique subscription legal services law firm that helps small businesses protect their brands and grow profitable and sustainable seven-figure organizations. Kim defines herself as an innovator, entrepreneur, legal industry disruptor, and a business coach—who happens to be a lawyer. In addition to growing and managing her firm, Kim coaches women building modern businesses, speaks on legal topics, teaches workshops for new entrepreneurs, and is a co-organizer of two legal tech communities: Atlanta Legal Tech and Atlanta Legal Hackers. Kim’s mission is to help foster a permanent shift in the way law firms deliver legal services to clients. You can follow her on Twitter at @kbennettlaw
    Erin Levine
    Erin Levine, Esq. is CEO and Founder of Hello Divorce, a do-it-yourself divorce navigator startup, and she is Managing Attorney at Levine Family Law Group, a full-service family law firm in Oakland, CA. Erin is working to democratize divorce by ensuring that “every American who wants a divorce has access to affordable, accessible and ethical legal assistance.” Erin has won numerous awards during her career, including the 2020 James I. Keane Memorial Award for Excellence in eLawyering, the 2019 ABA “Women in LegalTech” and Fastcase 50 Honoree awards, and the 2019 Reisman Award for Legal Innovation. You can follow Erin on Twitter at @hello_divorce
    Justin Osborn
    Justin Osborn is a founding member of Counsel Carolina (Osborn Gambale Beckley & Budd PLLC), whose personal advocacy for fairness and progressive social policies led to the firm’s RV-based mobile services program. A former insurance adjuster and insurance defense lawyer, Justin now represents clients against the same corporate and insurance interests he once defended. A proud tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation and one of the first in his family to obtain a college degree, Justin has rededicated his career to making legal services more equitable and universally accessible. You can follow Justin on Twitter at @justin_osborn

    • 30 min
    What's Broken—and Why It Needs to Change

    What's Broken—and Why It Needs to Change

    In this episode of Matters, we'll examine how the current legal system is broken, in which particular areas of legal service delivery the industry is failing, why change is direly needed—and what that change might look like.
    This episode’s discussion points include:

    Specific areas where the current legal system is dysfunctional

    Major issues of unmet need within the legal market

    How the existing legal system fails clients—and legal professionals

    What needs to shift in order to build a better legal profession

    Ways for law firms and legal professionals to start changing the status quo

    Episode Three’s guests include Erin Levine, CEO & Founder of Hello Divorce and Managing Attorney at Levine Family Law Group; Jordan Furlong, legal analyst and creator of the Law21 blog; and Nika Kabiri, a JD Ph.D who helps businesses of all sizes make better decisions. Listen in for their perspectives!
    Our Guests:
    Erin Levine
    Erin Levine, Esq. is CEO and Founder of Hello Divorce, a do-it-yourself divorce navigator startup, and she is Managing Attorney at Levine Family Law Group, a full-service family law firm in Oakland, CA. Erin is working to democratize divorce by ensuring that “every American who wants a divorce has access to affordable, accessible and ethical legal assistance.” Erin has won numerous awards during her career, including the 2020 James I. Keane Memorial Award for Excellence in eLawyering, the 2019 ABA “Women in LegalTech” and Fastcase 50 Honoree awards, and the 2019 Reisman Award for Legal Innovation. You can follow Erin on Twitter at @hello_divorce

    Jordan Furlong
    Jordan Furlong is a legal industry analyst and consultant based in Ottawa, Canada. In addition to being an author and the founder of the award-winning Law21 blog, Jordan is a Fellow of the College of Law Practice Management, and Past Chair of the College’s InnovAction Awards. He’s the Strategic Advisor in Residence at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, and he serves as co-chair of the Board of Directors for its Institute for Law Practice Management and Innovation. He’s also taught or guest-lectured in courses at Suffolk Law, Queen’s Law, and Osgoode Hall Law School that focus on preparing students to provide legal services deep into the 21st century. You can follow Jordan on Twitter at @jordan_law21

    Nika Kabiri
    Nika Kabiri has spent 20+ years studying how people make decisions in a variety of contexts. She has a JD from the University of Texas, a PhD in Sociology from the University of Washington, and currently teaches Decision Science at the University of Washington. Nika has worked with businesses of all sizes, including Amazon, Microsoft, VMware, Sony, Oakley, PepsiCo, General Mills, Anheuser-Busch InBev, the Seattle Seahawks, Zillow, Expedia, Smartsheet—and Clio. She is also an Advisor at Madrona Venture Labs, where she helps startups get their footing. You can follow Nika on Twitter at @nikakabiri

    • 42 min
    A History of Risk-Aversion in Legal

    A History of Risk-Aversion in Legal

    No risk, no reward—in this second episode of season two of Matters, we're joined by three guests to take a high-level view of the legal profession—chiefly, why lawyers tend to be so risk-averse, and the effects that this cautiousness has on legal practice, innovation, and firm sustainability.

    • 33 min
    The Client-Centered Law Firm: Why Client-Centered?

    The Client-Centered Law Firm: Why Client-Centered?

    In the first episode of our second season, our hosts speak with four experts—a practicing lawyer, a legal consultant and writer, a data scientist, and a legal professor—to provide a macro-level view of client-centered lawyering, examine why it’s vital to the future of legal service delivery, and give you a glimpse of what to expect on this season of the show.

    • 40 min
    Coming Soon: Matters, Season Two

    Coming Soon: Matters, Season Two

    In season two of Matters, we'll explore what it means to truly be client-centered, how client-centered practices can improve access to justice, and how law firms are addressing a monumental shift in consumer expectations. Learn more at www.clio.com/podcast.

    • 1 min
    Why the Latent Legal Market Matters

    Why the Latent Legal Market Matters

    If you learned that the unmet legal needs of consumers amounted to a multi-billion opportunity, what would that mean for the legal industry?
    What would it mean for your firm?
    In this episode of the Matters legal podcast, Teresa Matich interviews Jack Newton, Clio’s CEO, Co-founder, and author of the new best-selling book The Client-Centered Law Firm. In the episode, Jack speaks about one of the book’s core concepts, the “latent legal market”—and why it matters.
    The latent legal market refers to the untapped potential of all the would-be legal clients who aren’t currently using legal services to solve their legal issues. Consequently, it also refers to all the unrealized revenue that law firms could generate if they focused on providing the experience these would-be clients are looking for.
    No one understands this better than Jack, whose interview highlights the incredible opportunities the latent legal market presents for law firms.

    • 29 min

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5.0 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

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