19 episodes

Do you wonder why small towns, small businesses and people seem to be falling behind and you don’t know why? Feeling helpless about whether any of us can do anything to halt the decline of the places we love? Well, we know a secret. Our society fought the same battles about 100 years ago, and small towns won.

Join Andrew Cameron, the founder of the Center for Small Town Success and small business owner, every other week as he rediscovers our Canadian Anti-Monopoly tradition. The goal is to learn how we successfully fought back against Monopolies in the 1900s so we can restore power to small towns, small businesses and individuals today.

Listen to this podcast if you want to learn more about Canadian Competition Policy and to join the Anti-Monopoly movement. #freeboswell #cdnpoli

Monopolies Killed My Hometown Andrew Cameron

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Do you wonder why small towns, small businesses and people seem to be falling behind and you don’t know why? Feeling helpless about whether any of us can do anything to halt the decline of the places we love? Well, we know a secret. Our society fought the same battles about 100 years ago, and small towns won.

Join Andrew Cameron, the founder of the Center for Small Town Success and small business owner, every other week as he rediscovers our Canadian Anti-Monopoly tradition. The goal is to learn how we successfully fought back against Monopolies in the 1900s so we can restore power to small towns, small businesses and individuals today.

Listen to this podcast if you want to learn more about Canadian Competition Policy and to join the Anti-Monopoly movement. #freeboswell #cdnpoli

    e18 - Rogers-Shaw and Competition Policy for all of us

    e18 - Rogers-Shaw and Competition Policy for all of us

    Welcome back everyone! In this episode I dive into my take on the Rogers/Shaw merger. Tl dr; the Competition Policy Machine worked exactly how it has been designed. I also share how I see a democratic approach to Competition policy would work for all of us.
    Join CAMP February 2, 2023 at 12:00 EST for a more in-depth discussion of the Rogers/Shaw merger. Register here. Or check out a replay here.
    Some quick house keeping - I am going to pause new episodes until Spring. Stay subscribed and I'll be back soon.
    Links from today's episode:

    Rogers faces doubt over Shaw deal as closing date approaches
    Statement from the Commissioner of Competition on the Federal Court of Appeal's decision regarding the Rogers-Shaw merger
    Rogers, Shaw and Videotron's Cost Submissions
    Commissioner's Cost Submissions
    Globalive takes its offer to buy Freedom Mobile to Shaw
    Consultation on the future of competition policy in Canada

    • 24 min
    E17: Roll-Up Those Newspapers

    E17: Roll-Up Those Newspapers

    Today's episode is all about local newspapers. I've had a long history with them, every Saturday my Dad would buy 4 different papers and we'd all sit around and read them. When I was 9, inspired by adding to my hockey card collection, I called and got myself a paper route delivering the Chronicle Herald. Little did I know, I was going to be running my own little business.
    More importantly, I want to talk about some of the common stories about why local news died, and I want to add a couple of my own to this list. In my mind, the biggest culprit was companies buying up and consolidating all the local newspapers, in Amherst's case this was Transcontenintal Media Group.


    This episode was inspired by my Grandmother and the scrapbooks she kept full of all newspaper articles mentioning anyone in our family. I found a scrapbook from 1943-1945 that was full of articles about my Grandfather from when he was a labour leader at the Canada Car and Foundry plant in Amherst. This plant manufactured airplane parts during WWII.

    I hope you enjoy this episode, and I wish you all a Happy Holidays and a succesful 2023.

    • 20 min
    E16: How to fix retail? - Price Spreads Report part 6

    E16: How to fix retail? - Price Spreads Report part 6

    This episode is perfect timing. We're looking at the recommendations the Price Spreads Commission is making to try to fix the retail industry in the 1930's, and on November 17, 2022 our Federal Government announced a review of our current Competition Act. A lot of the recommendations made in the 1930's are still relevant, and we can make today. Listen to this episode and learn what ideas we need to reuse.

    • 19 min
    E15: What were they actually doing? - Price Spreads Report Pt 5

    E15: What were they actually doing? - Price Spreads Report Pt 5

    We're getting near the end of the discussion on the department and chain stores. This episode will be a look into the specific actions of the chain and department stores that worried the Commission. These behaviors were lumped into mass buying and price concessions, and competitive practices in retail trade. Price concessions are between mass buyers and suppliers, retail trade is between mass buyers and other retailers.

    This is a perfect time for this episode - the Canadian Competition Bureau just announced a market study of the Canadian grocery industry. Basically, the Competition Bureau is going to look into 'competitive practices in retail trade'. again.

    • 23 min
    E14: The Price Spreads Report, part 4 - Chain Stores

    E14: The Price Spreads Report, part 4 - Chain Stores

    Last episode was a dive into department stores, this week is all about chain stores – think Wal-Mart, Superstore, The Brick, Home Depot, Kent. We’re going to get in the difference between chain and department stores, and how the impact of chain stores differed from the impact of department stores. Most importantly stick around to hear about the how different retail in Amherst is today compared to when I was a kid.

    • 19 min
    E13: The Price Spreads Report Pt 3 - Department Stores

    E13: The Price Spreads Report Pt 3 - Department Stores

    I'm continuing my deep dive into the Price Spreads report and it's look at the retail industry in the 1930's. This week's episode is all about department stores, specifically Eaton's, The Bay. In the 1930's Eaton's did 7% of all retail sales in Canada. Canada has a long, history with the Hudson's Bay company. I look back quickly on the history of HBC and how they used similar monopolistic tactics when they had the dominant position in the fur trading industry. And to connect back to today, I talk a lot about Amazon. I know Amazon wasn't around in the 1930's but Amazon has a lot of the same dominant characteristics and impacts today that the department stores had in the 1930's.

    Sign up for my newsletter at mkht.ca to get a bite size 5 competition policy related items each week.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

AnimalCrosser242342 ,

A great exploration of small town issues

I love the tone and information. A must listen for anyone who cares about our small towns.

KeldonB ,

Learned a lot

Excellent podcast telling the under appreciated story of the impact of monopoly on small towns in Canada

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