31 episodes

We explore a wide range of topics related to pharmacy practice, patient care, and healthcare delivery in every setting. Listen in as we speak with respected experts and key thought leaders about their lessons learned. Our goal is to empower pharmacists, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy students to advance their practice by introducing them to new knowledge and role models.

PharmacyForward Division of Pharmacy Professional Development - University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy

    • Science

We explore a wide range of topics related to pharmacy practice, patient care, and healthcare delivery in every setting. Listen in as we speak with respected experts and key thought leaders about their lessons learned. Our goal is to empower pharmacists, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy students to advance their practice by introducing them to new knowledge and role models.

    Social Media to Make Professional Connections (II)

    Social Media to Make Professional Connections (II)

    Ashley Barlow, PharmD (MD Anderson Cancer Center) & Brooke Barlow, PharmD (University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center) - @theABofPharmaC and PGY2 Pharmacy Practice Residents - talk to us about developing their professional brand using Twitter and why creating an online presence can help you achieve your career goals.
    Key Lessons:
    Social media, especially Twitter, has become an increasingly important forum for connecting with professional colleagues and engaging in dialog about cutting edge issues that impact patient care and pharmacy practice.
    To get started, read this brief article by Robert Pugliese entitled How Twitter Has Made Me a Better Pharmacist.
    Consider maintaining separate professional and personal social media accounts.
    Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are the most commonly used social media platforms for professional networking purposes.
    Everyone should purposefully develop their professional brand online.  Your digital footprint ultimately reflects your reputation.
    Your online persona is perhaps the first and most important impression that others with have of you.
    Think about the ABCDEs of your social media presence. A - align your social media with your professional goals.  B - build your profile with a professional bio and photo.  C - curate the content you find interesting and important.  D - define your audience.  E - engage in conversations ... be sure to like, comment, and retweet!
    Your online network through social media can lead to many new opportunities.
    Get the Social Media Infographic by Ashley and Brooke Barlow (@theABofPharmaC)

    • 23 min
    Social Media to Make Professional Connections (I)

    Social Media to Make Professional Connections (I)

    Dave L. Dixon, PharmD, BCACP, BCPS, CDE, CLS  - Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy and - Brent N. Reed, PharmD, BCPS, BCCP  - University of Maryland School of Pharmacy - talk with us about using social media for professional development and staying current with the latest evidence to support your practice.
    Key Lessons:
    Social media includes a wide range of online applications intended to interact with other users in a public setting.
    Social media, especially Twitter, has become an increasingly important forum for connecting with professional colleagues and engaging in dialog about cutting edge issues that impact patient care and pharmacy practice.
    Social media use should be done in a systematic, thoughtful way - you need to decide what your goals are, who to follow, and how frequently to check your social media feeds.
    Being a passive recipient of social media posts (aka being a "lurker") is a great way to get started but eventually, you may wish to share and comment on content you find valuable ... as well as create your own original content.
    Learning how to curate your social media feed can help prevent information overload.
    Following a professional conference (and the people attending) on Twitter can enhance the conference experience and enable those who are not able to attend the conference to learn about what's happening.
    Engaging in social media can be personally and professionally rewarding.  Share your personality!  It should be fun.
    Get the Social Media Infographic by Ashley and Brooke Barlow (@theABofPharmaC)

    • 21 min
    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (III)

    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (III)

    Casey Tak, PhD, MPH - University of North Carolina Eschelman School of Pharmacy and - Karen Gunning, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP - University of Utah College of Pharmacy - talk with us about hormonal contraception and how pharmacists in community and ambulatory care settings can increase women's access to care.
    Key Lessons:
    A variety of contraceptive methods have been available through pharmacies for decades but many states now permit pharmacists to directly "provide" hormonal contraception without a prescription.
    A state-wide standing order is the most common mechanism for authorizing pharmacists to provide hormonal contraception directly to patients, but state laws and regulations vary.
    The CDC Guidance for Healthcare Providers - US Medical Eligibility Criteria do not require a woman to have a pelvic exam prior to receiving hormonal contraception. The pharmacist needs to ask about and document the patient's medical and medication history, take the patient's blood pressure, and inquire about contraceptive preferences before providing hormonal contraception.
    Some states require pharmacists to refer patients to a primary care provider to receive recommended preventive care, such as pelvic exams, breast exams, and Pap smears.  Even when this is not required by state law, it's a best practice to ensure all women are receiving appropriate health maintenance services.
    Insurance coverage for pharmacist-provided hormonal contraception is not universal - many private insurance plans do not cover the cost of hormonal contraception or compensate for the pharmacist's time.  However, Medicaid programs often do (varies by state).
    Increasing access to hormonal contraception is good public policy because it can positively impact Medicaid costs by reducing unintended pregnancies, high-risk pregnancies, and infant mortality.
    Student pharmacists can (and have) played an important role in advocating for pharmacist-provided hormonal contraction.

    • 23 min
    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (II)

    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (II)

    Kristin Wiisanen, PharmD - Clinical Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Precision Medicine at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy - talks with us about using genomics to guide therapeutic decisions.
    Key Lessons:
    Precision medicine and personalized medicine are synonymous terms.
    Pharmacogenomics is a tool to personalize treatment decisions.  However, it is not the only tool.  Other readily available and routinely collected clinical information has been used to personalize therapy for decades (e.g. blood type, serum creatinine, CV risk score).
    While creating a separate pharmacogenomic service can help ease practitioners into using pharmacogenomic tests, learning how to integrate genetic information as a routine part of clinical decision-making is the ultimate goal.
    Pharmacists have a unique role (and responsibility) to know when and how to use the results of pharmacogenomic tests.
    Teaching students, residents, and fellows to use pharmacogenomic information should be done in an integrated manner - considered alongside other clinical data, not in isolation.
    Several excellent resources now exist that can assist pharmacists and other providers use the results of pharmacogenomic tests including the Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB) and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines.

    • 22 min
    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (I)

    Expanding the Frontiers of Pharmacy Practice (I)

    Lucas Berenbrok, PharmD, BCACP, TTS - Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Therapeutics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy - talks with us about hearing loss and the important role pharmacists can play as OTC hearing aids become available in 2020.
    Key Lessons:
    Most older adults have some degree of hearing loss and it can significantly impact the quality of life
    There are many causes of hearing loss including medications, infections, cerumen, and aging
    A screening exam for hearing impairment is part of the Welcome to Medicare Exam, but hearing aids are not covered by Medicare.
    OTC hearing aids are predicted to be a far more affordable option for patients with mild-to-moderate hearing loss.
    Pharmacists have an important role in assessing patients and referring them to an audiologist for hearing exams.
    Pharmacists can assist patients select an appropriate OTC hearing aid
    To find an audiologist: American Academy of Audiology

    • 14 min
    Gender Identity & Transgender Care (III)

    Gender Identity & Transgender Care (III)

    Cheyenne C. Newsome, PharmD, BCACP and Jessica Conklin, PharmD, BCACP, CDE, AAHIV — passionate advocates for the role of pharmacists in the care of transgender persons — talk with us about the need for patient and provider education and about the benefits and risks of gender-affirming treatment.
    Key Lessons:
    Gender-affirming therapy is highly effective, improving the quality of life in more than 80% of patients.
    Hormonal therapy is the cornerstone of gender-affirming therapy. 
    Testosterone is used for masculinization by trans-men.  It is traditionally given by intramuscular injection but subcutaneous injections are easier to administered and may have a smoother effect (e.g. lower peak effect). 
    Side effects from testosterone are common including body and facial hair growth (you don't get to pick!), deepened voice (irreversible), clitoral enlargement, acne, menstrual irregularities, and weight gain from increased appetite.
    Estradiol (preferred estrogen) is used for feminization by trans-women. In addition, spironolactone is used in high doses for its anti-androgen effects.  Side effects are similar to those experienced by cisgender women.
    While trans-men often develop amenorrhea, pregnancy is still possible.  Frank discussions about the use of contraception, if sexually active, is important.
    A number of great resources are available to inform drug therapy decision making particularly the Endocrine Society Guidelines.
    Pharmacists can uniquely contribute to optimizing the care of trans-men and -women.
    To learn more, view and download the Show Notes!

    • 25 min

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