6 episodes

Following a long absence (let’s call it an extended break), the Sordid Cinema Podcast made its return, with a new format that sees hosts Ricky D and Patrick Murphy taking a look at some of their favorite films over the years that may have flown under the radar for some audiences. This new version of the show focuses more on discussion and less, on reviews, and examines the selections from a multitude of angles and breaks down what makes these films so special.

Sordid Cinema Podcast Ricky D

    • Film Reviews

Following a long absence (let’s call it an extended break), the Sordid Cinema Podcast made its return, with a new format that sees hosts Ricky D and Patrick Murphy taking a look at some of their favorite films over the years that may have flown under the radar for some audiences. This new version of the show focuses more on discussion and less, on reviews, and examines the selections from a multitude of angles and breaks down what makes these films so special.

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: 'Witness' is Masterful, Plain, Old-Fashioned Filmmaking

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: 'Witness' is Masterful, Plain, Old-Fashioned Filmmaking

    Witness 1985 Podcast ReviewThis week on the Sordid Cinema Podcast, Rick and Patrick get their city hands dirty with 1985’s Witness, directed by Peter Weir. The story of a little Amish boy who watches a grisly murder take place in a train station bathroom manages to combine a subdued-but-tense police thriller with an exceptionally grounded love story between detective John Book (Harrison Fords, in his only Oscar-nominated role) and the boy’s mother, Rachel (played by Kelly McGillis), along with a theme contrasting pacifism and the use of deadly force. The guys discuss how Weir expertly maintains restraint, often opting for subtle facial expressions over dialogue, and plenty of quiet moments abound. The director also once again makes the presence of the land deeply felt, creating an absorbing environment complemented by an otherworldly score by Maurice Jarre.With so many great scenes, how can we choose the best? What might Rick and Patrick change about this nearly flawless film? Along the way in answering these questions and more, the guys dive into the production history, as well as talk about how this film fits in with Peter Weir’s filmography. Have a listen!Listen to the show on Spotify Listen to the show on YouTubeListen to the show on iTunesListen to the show on StitcherListen on Google PlayListen to the show on Podbean

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Sordid Cinema Podcast: ‘Color Out of Space’ Combines Lovecraft With Nicolas Cage

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: ‘Color Out of Space’ Combines Lovecraft With Nicolas Cage

    Color Out of Space Podcast ReviewThis week Rick and Patrick are joined by Goomba Stomp writer and H.P. Lovecraft fan Thomas O’Connor to discuss Richard Stanley’s directorial return to the big screen with Color Out of Space. This story of a rural Massachusetts family who starts a descent into madness after a meteorite plummets onto their property stars Nicolas Cage, who gives another wacky performance that helps sell the sci-fi craziness. Though there is some agreement as to the film’s flaws, the guys talk about the difficulty in adapting Lovecraft, as well as how much Stanley and Cage get right in the attempt. And no, we don’t forget the llamas.So what scenes really stand out for us? What would we change? Will Color Out of Space stand the test of time, or will its colorful dread fade away? For all this and more, have a listen!Listen to the show on SpotifyListen to the show on YouTubeListen to the show on iTunesListen to the show on StitcherListen on Google PlayListen to the show on Podbean

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Sordid Cinema Podcast: 'His Girl Friday' Still Easily Passes the Howard Hawks Test

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: 'His Girl Friday' Still Easily Passes the Howard Hawks Test

    This week the Sordid Cinema Podcast takes a short break from all the blood and guts to look back at Howard Hawks’ 1940 screwball comedy masterpiece, His Girl Friday. This adapted story of a newspaper writer (Rosalind Russell) trying to break free from the journalist lifestyle only to be lured back in by an incredibly big story — as well as her boss/ex-husband(!), played by Cary Grant — features cascades of whip-smart wit, an abundance of double crosses and double entendres, and fantastic direction from one of old Hollywood’s finest filmmakers.Rick and Patrick are joined by writer/film critic Mariko McDonald to discuss the impact of Hawks swapping out the original male lead for a female lead, reveal tidbits about the production and how they managed to fit a 191-page screenplay into 92 minutes, pick our favorite scenes as well as elements we might change, and much more! For an in-depth dive into this wonderful classic, have a listen!Listen to the show on PodbeanListen to the show on SpotifyListen to the show on YouTubeListen to the show on iTunesListen to the show on Stitcher

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Sordid Cinema Podcast: Does John Carpenter's 'In the Mouth of Madness' Stand the Test of Time?

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: Does John Carpenter's 'In the Mouth of Madness' Stand the Test of Time?

    With a list of classics under his belt that include masterpieces like Halloween, Assault on Precinct 13, and The Thing, John Carpenter has long been celebrated by movie lovers, even if many of his films have flown under the radar with general audiences. This week the Sordid Cinema Podcast looks back at one of his most underrated (at least according to us) works, 1994’s In the Mouth of Madness. Rick and Patrick are joined by fellow Carpenter fan and Goomba Stomp writer Christopher Cross to break down just what makes all the psychological horror here so memorable.So what exactly is going on in this story of a cocky insurance claims investigator tracking down a mysterious horror writer in a creepy town? How much inspiration does the film take from sources like H.P. Lovecraft, the noir genre, Stephen King, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers? Does the lunacy on display hold up today? And what’s with that cast of extras? For all this and much more discussion, have a listen!For all this and more, have a listen!Listen to the show on PodbeanListen to the show on SpotifyListen to the show on YouTubeListen to the show on iTunesListen to the show on Stitcher

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Sordid Cinema Podcast #508: ‘Tremors’ (1990)

    Sordid Cinema Podcast #508: ‘Tremors’ (1990)

    How has this low-budget creature feature about a dusty southwestern town under attack by carnivorous worm monsters managed to secure a place in cult movie history? For this episode of the Sordid Cinema Podcast, Rick and Patrick burrow deep into Tremors in order to break down just what makes this film so special. From the creative and menacing practical effects, to the simple and efficient script, as well as the charismatic cast and skillful camera work, there’s a lot to love here. Join us as we go into some of the production history, discuss in detail our favorite and least favorite scenes, who or what we think the film’s success most relies on, and whether we think Tremors will continue to stand the test of time.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Sordid Cinema Podcast: Why ‘Parasite’ is the Best Film of 2019

    Sordid Cinema Podcast: Why ‘Parasite’ is the Best Film of 2019

    The Sordid Cinema Podcast makes its return, with a new format that sees hosts Ricky D and Patrick Murphy taking a look at some of our favorite films over the years that may have flown under the radar for some audiences. This new version of the long-running show will focus more on discussion and less, on reviews, as we hope to examine the selections from a multitude of angles and break down what makes these films so special.For our first episode, Ricky D has selected Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite, which landed at the top of Goomba Stomp’s list of the Best Movies of 2019. The guys detail their favorite moments from this genre-bending satire on class that follows a poor South Korean family which scams its way into the employ of a wealthy household. Is Parasite the best film of 2019? There’s a lot to love and talk about, and we hope you enjoy it! 

    • 1 hr 21 min

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