15 episodes

culture the revolution of love

The Ferment Marcus Peter Rempel & Alana Levandoski

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.9, 12 Ratings

culture the revolution of love

    15 - Lydia Wylie-Kellerman

    15 - Lydia Wylie-Kellerman

    Lydia Wylie-Kellerman is co-editor of the blog, radicaldiscipleship.net, coordinator of Word and World: A People’s School bridging the gap between seminary, sanctuary and the street, and the newly minted editor of geez magazine, recently flown the coop of Winnipeg to be nested in Detroit.

    • 46 min
    14 - Leah Kostamo - Planted

    14 - Leah Kostamo - Planted

    For Leah Kostamo, Jesus’ counsel to “Consider the lilies” is not just a preamble to some advice on living simply. It is an exhortation in its own right. For Leah, a life of paying attention to the natural world has led to a passion for conserving the integrity of that world, our common home. Leah is the co-founder and spiritual care coordinator for A Rocha Canada, a Christian conservation organization involved in environmental education, habitat restoration and organic farming. She also is a co-founder of Kingfisher Farm, an A Rocha offshoot where some of the A Rocha staff and their friends live together in intentional community. Leah’s book, Planted: A Story of Creation, Calling, and Community, records some of their adventures together, and lessons learned along the way. We were delighted with her humility and wisdom, her extensive vocabulary for animal groupings, and her story of how Margaret Atwood became a champion of her book and her cause.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    13 - Jodi Spargur - Catalyzer for Justice

    13 - Jodi Spargur - Catalyzer for Justice

    Jodi Spargur is a settler of Nordic/German heritage living and working on the unceeded territory of the Squamish, Musqueaum and Tslei-Watuth Peoples. Jodi is a farmer, furniture-mover, pastor and catalyzer for justice and healing between the church and indigenous peoples in Canada.
    Jodi continually crosses thresholds into spaces where she has much to learn, whether that be in the implications of residential schools for well-meaning people of faith today, or the struggles of Indigenous families to resist apprehensions by the Child Welfare System, or a resistance camp of the Wet’suwet’en standing in the way of pipeline expansions.
    The pathway into her current work with Healing at the Wounding Place came largely out of her experiences with planting and pastoring God’s House of Many Faces, a church in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver that squatted in borrowed spaces, met outside whenever weather permitted and was formed around Indigenous people who made up a large portion of the church.  Impacts of Residential Schools and the systemic racism that still marks Canada’s relationship with Indigenous people were evident in the day to day lives of church and community members.
    Currently Jodi is leading the work of Healing at the Wounding Place based out of Grandview Calvary Baptist Church looking to engage people of faith and indigenous communities in walking into whole, healing and just relationships. Healing has begun in indigenous communities across Canada.  Jodi holds out the question whether the church, one of the primary wounding places, can become a place of healing for indigenous and non-indigenous people alike.
    Links
    Jodi Spargur’s website
    Unistoten Resistance Camp
    Wet’suwet’en website – check out the video, “Your Voice, Our Future”
    Globe and Mail Wet’suwet’en Photo Gallery
    Globe and Mail guide to the story

    • 1 hr 15 min
    12 - Stan McKay - The Liberation of Theology

    12 - Stan McKay - The Liberation of Theology

    We like to think of Stan McKay as Manitoba’s Bishop Tutu. He has held the highest office in the land in the United Church of Canada, but his influence and recognition as a spiritual leader of the Cree extends well beyond the bounds of the church. The name given to him in the lodge is Walking Buffalo, a name that associates him with a creature and a way of life threatened by extinction. It is also a name that ties him to the teaching of Respect, the teaching held by the Buffalo in the Seven Sacred Teachings of his people. Stan teaches mostly through story, as a practice of respect. Still, his challenge is clear, pointing to a way of being that is opposite to Western values of competition, domination and aggression. Stan goes beyond liberation theology to “the liberation of theology.” We are honoured by his gift of time and voice. Chi-meegwetch! (Great thanks!)

    • 1 hr 15 min
    11 - Alana Levandoski - Integral

    11 - Alana Levandoski - Integral

    Alana Levandoski has been called a “right-brain theologian,” but she wasn’t always open about her faith. Today her website introduces her as “a song and chant writer and recording artist, in the Christian tradition, who lives with her family on an aspiring permaculture farm on the Canadian prairies.” She is really on her second music career. Her integration of faith and art, her grounding in a life of family and a life on the land arises from a moment of rebirth at what seemed like the end of the road for an up-and-coming darling of the alt-folk scene, a starlet who was playing big stages in Nashville and feeling utterly alone. One day this restless road warrior hit a wall, and after some time, broke through to a mystery. Sharing out of that mystery, she has today reemerged with new voice and new energy. Both political and mystical, Alana Levandoski is as edgy as ever, singing from the margins to the centre of our being and of our moment.
    In this honest and wide-ranging conversation, Alana talks to Marcus about her journey as a spiritual being having a human experience.

    • 1 hr 32 min
    10 - Steve Bell - Completely Porous

    10 - Steve Bell - Completely Porous

    Steve Bell is a much beloved Winnipeg singer/songwriter. Steve sings songs of Christian faith, but with an authenticity that makes him accessible to fans well beyond the Christian fold. “You are singing your story, you aren’t telling me my story,” says one of Steve’s regular atheist concert attendees. We were delighted to sit down with Steve to hear his thoughts on the vocation of the artist, the story of how he learned to play guitar from inmates in the Drumheller prison chapel, and to learn about Steve’s recent forays into advocacy for Indigenous rights.
    Most recently Steve has been active in advocating for Bill C-262, which would see the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples passed into law in Canada. Two conservative Senators have been filibustering to effectively kill the passing of this bill. Steve takes them on in this detailed open letter. 
    You can check out Steve’s music and upcoming shows at stevebell.com. You can google “Shoal Lake 40 Freedom Road” to learn more about the campaign discussed in this episode, or check out Steve’s synopsis of the situation.
    The title of this episode comes from Steve’s description of the gift/flaw of the artist: the state of being completely porous to the pains and sorrows of the world. This is Steve Bell on The Ferment, Completely Porous.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

!suann ,

The Ferment

Lots of content to think about. I really appreciate this.
The original blessing episode is something I have never thought about.

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